School safety and security management

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  • School safety and security management

    1. 1. ““WARNINGWARNING ”” KEEP QUIET!KEEP QUIET! WE ARE ABOUT TO START.WE ARE ABOUT TO START.
    2. 2. WDC UNIVERSITY OF BAGUIOUNIVERSITY OF BAGUIO INDUSTRIAL SECURITY MANAGEMENT REVIEWINDUSTRIAL SECURITY MANAGEMENT REVIEW (2006)(2006) ByBy DR. MILLER F. PECKLEYDR. MILLER F. PECKLEY FORENSIC SPECIALISTFORENSIC SPECIALIST (FIREARM IDENTIFICATION)(FIREARM IDENTIFICATION) FORMER UB CHIEF SECURITYFORMER UB CHIEF SECURITY FORMER OPERATION OFFICER-PEACEMAKER SECURITY AND INVESTIGATIVE INC.FORMER OPERATION OFFICER-PEACEMAKER SECURITY AND INVESTIGATIVE INC. TRAINING INSTRUCTOR-NORTHWEST SECURITY ACADEMY INC.TRAINING INSTRUCTOR-NORTHWEST SECURITY ACADEMY INC. FORMER DEAN-COLLEGE OF CRIMINOLOGY (1993-1998 and 2000-2005)FORMER DEAN-COLLEGE OF CRIMINOLOGY (1993-1998 and 2000-2005) SECURITY PRACTITIONER/CONSULTANTSECURITY PRACTITIONER/CONSULTANT VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATION-UNIVERSITY OF BAGUIOVICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATION-UNIVERSITY OF BAGUIO
    3. 3. REVIEWER WDC
    4. 4. PRE-TESTPRE-TEST INDUSTRIALINDUSTRIAL SECURITYSECURITY MANAGMENTMANAGMENT
    5. 5. 1.1. This involves the security of plans andThis involves the security of plans and business enterprises which includes thebusiness enterprises which includes the safeguarding of personnel, process,safeguarding of personnel, process, properties and operations.properties and operations. (August 2004 board exam)(August 2004 board exam) A.A. Personnel securityPersonnel security B.B. Document securityDocument security C.C. Industrial securityIndustrial security D.D. Communication securityCommunication security
    6. 6. 2. The importance of the firm or2. The importance of the firm or installation with reference to theinstallation with reference to the national economy or security:national economy or security: (August 2003 board exam)(August 2003 board exam) A.A. relative vulnerabilityrelative vulnerability B.B. relative criticalityrelative criticality C.C. relative necessityrelative necessity D.D. relative securityrelative security
    7. 7. 3. The exterior and interior parallel area3. The exterior and interior parallel area near the perimeter barrier of annear the perimeter barrier of an industrial compound to afford betterindustrial compound to afford better observation and patrol movement isobservation and patrol movement is known as: (April 1988 board exam)known as: (April 1988 board exam) A.A. ProtectiveProtective B.B. Clear zoneClear zone C.C. Twilight zoneTwilight zone D.D. Patrol lane zonePatrol lane zone
    8. 8. 4. Protection of classified4. Protection of classified documents/matters concerning theirdocuments/matters concerning their preparation, classification, reproduction,preparation, classification, reproduction, handling, transmission, disposal andhandling, transmission, disposal and destruction. (August 2003 board exam)destruction. (August 2003 board exam) A.A. Document securityDocument security B.B. Operational securityOperational security C.C. Physical securityPhysical security D.D. Organizational securityOrganizational security
    9. 9. 5.5. A security guard is duly authorizedA security guard is duly authorized to carry his licensed F/A only toto carry his licensed F/A only to the premises of their office tothe premises of their office to their:their: (Sept. 2000 board exam)(Sept. 2000 board exam) A.A. Place to workPlace to work B.B. Identified placeIdentified place C.C. Place work and returnPlace work and return D.D. Choice of locationChoice of location
    10. 10. 6. The minimum age requirement for6. The minimum age requirement for Security Manager or Operator of aSecurity Manager or Operator of a security agency is:security agency is: (Sept. 2000 board exam)(Sept. 2000 board exam) A.A. 40 years old40 years old B.B. 35 years old35 years old C.C. 25 years old25 years old D.D. 45 years old45 years old
    11. 11. 7. It is a natural man-made structure7. It is a natural man-made structure or physical device that is capable ofor physical device that is capable of restricting, determining, or delayingrestricting, determining, or delaying illegal access to installation.illegal access to installation. (Sept. 2000 board exam)(Sept. 2000 board exam) A.A. FenceFence B.B. WallWall C.C. BarrierBarrier D.D. HazardHazard
    12. 12. 8. It provides means and ways by which8. It provides means and ways by which all personnel and employees areall personnel and employees are trained to make them securitytrained to make them security conscious and disciplined.conscious and disciplined. (Sept. 2000 board exam)(Sept. 2000 board exam) A.A. Security checkSecurity check B.B. Security educationSecurity education C.C. Security investigationSecurity investigation D.D. Security promotionSecurity promotion
    13. 13. 9. Under physical security, what should9. Under physical security, what should be placed between the prospectivebe placed between the prospective intruder and target installation?intruder and target installation? (Aug. 2003 board exam)(Aug. 2003 board exam) a.a. HazardHazard b.b. RiskRisk c.c. NetNet d.d. BarrierBarrier
    14. 14. 10. These are barbed wires placed10. These are barbed wires placed above a vertical fence in order toabove a vertical fence in order to increase physical protection ofincrease physical protection of establishments or installations.establishments or installations. A.A. Top towerTop tower B.B. Cellar guardCellar guard C.C. Top guardTop guard D.D. Tower guard houseTower guard house
    15. 15. OUTLINE TOPICSOUTLINE TOPICS A.A. LAWS RELATED TO SECURITY MANAGEMENTLAWS RELATED TO SECURITY MANAGEMENT R.A. No. 5487R.A. No. 5487 – approved– approved June 13, 1969June 13, 1969, known as, known as PrivatePrivate Security Agency LawSecurity Agency Law P.D. 100 –P.D. 100 – approved January 17, 1973, Amended R.A.approved January 17, 1973, Amended R.A. 5487, making5487, making moremore responsive to theresponsive to the demands of private security agency in the country.demands of private security agency in the country. BB.. ORIGINORIGIN Vigiles –Vigiles – soldiers assigned to guard the city of Rome. They aresoldiers assigned to guard the city of Rome. They are the night watchmen.the night watchmen. Nicknames –Nicknames – rent-a-cops, toy cops, imitation bacon, blue army,rent-a-cops, toy cops, imitation bacon, blue army, entrance decors, sayote guard, poste ng benecoentrance decors, sayote guard, poste ng beneco WDC
    16. 16. RELATED GOVERNMENT andRELATED GOVERNMENT and PRIVATE AGENCIESPRIVATE AGENCIES 1.1. PNPSAGSDPNPSAGSD (Philippine National Police Security Agency Guard(Philippine National Police Security Agency Guard andand SupervisionSupervision Division)Division) 2.2. PNP SOSIAPNP SOSIA (Philippine National Police Supervisory Office for(Philippine National Police Supervisory Office for Security andSecurity and Investigative Agencies) – unit in the PNP inInvestigative Agencies) – unit in the PNP in charges of the supervision,charges of the supervision, direction anddirection and control of allcontrol of all agencies security offices in the country.agencies security offices in the country. 3.3. PADPAOPADPAO (Philippine Association of Detective and Protective(Philippine Association of Detective and Protective AgencyAgency Protectors Inc) – authorized to issue the implementingProtectors Inc) – authorized to issue the implementing rules and issuesrules and issues pertaining to R.A. 5487.pertaining to R.A. 5487. 4.4. FEOFEO (Firearms and Explosives Office) – issuance of license of(Firearms and Explosives Office) – issuance of license of firearms tofirearms to security agencies.security agencies. 5.5. SECSEC (Security and Exchange Commission) – registration of(Security and Exchange Commission) – registration of securitysecurity business.business. 6.6. DTIDTI (Department of Trade and Industry) – registration of(Department of Trade and Industry) – registration of security.security. 7.7. SAGSD-CSGSAGSD-CSG (Security Agency Guard and Supervision Division-(Security Agency Guard and Supervision Division- CivilCivil Security Group) – application of license to exerciseSecurity Group) – application of license to exercise profession asprofession as security guardsecurity guard
    17. 17. IMPORTANT TERMSIMPORTANT TERMS  PERSONPERSON  SECURITYSECURITY  SECURITY GUARDSECURITY GUARD  PRIVATE DETECTIVEPRIVATE DETECTIVE  DUTY DETAIL ORDERDUTY DETAIL ORDER  MISSION ORDERMISSION ORDER  SECURITY GUARD FORCESECURITY GUARD FORCE  LICENSE TO OPERATE (LTO)LICENSE TO OPERATE (LTO)  SECURITY OPERATIONSSECURITY OPERATIONS  SECURITY HAZARDSSECURITY HAZARDS  SECURITY BARRIERSSECURITY BARRIERS  PROTECTIVE MEASURESPROTECTIVE MEASURES  VULNERABILITYVULNERABILITY  RELATIVE VULNERABILITYRELATIVE VULNERABILITY  CRITICALITYCRITICALITY  RELATIVE CRITICALITYRELATIVE CRITICALITY  VAULTVAULT  SAFESAFE  CLEAR ZONECLEAR ZONE  HYDRANTHYDRANT  ALARMALARM  BREACH OF SECURITYBREACH OF SECURITY  THREATTHREAT  PERIMETERPERIMETER  VIP SECURITYVIP SECURITY  SECURITY EDUCATIONSECURITY EDUCATION  ACCESS LISTACCESS LIST  SECURITY SURVEYSECURITY SURVEY  ANNUNCIATORSANNUNCIATORS  PILFERAGEPILFERAGE  LICENSELICENSE  PERMITPERMIT  CONTINGENCYCONTINGENCY  PERIMETER OPENINGPERIMETER OPENING  SECURITY PROGRAMSECURITY PROGRAM  BUFFERBUFFER  ADVANCE SECURITYADVANCE SECURITY  CLOSE-IN SECURITYCLOSE-IN SECURITY  LOCKLOCK  SECURITY LIGHTINGSECURITY LIGHTING  SECURITY OPERATIONSECURITY OPERATION  SECURITY GUARD FORCESECURITY GUARD FORCE  PROPHYLACTIC OPERATIONSPROPHYLACTIC OPERATIONS  DEFENSE IN DEPTHDEFENSE IN DEPTH  CONSPIRACY THEORYCONSPIRACY THEORY  RISK MANAGEMENTRISK MANAGEMENT
    18. 18. PRIVATE SECURITY SERVICEPRIVATE SECURITY SERVICE  100% Filipino Citizen100% Filipino Citizen  25 Years Old25 Years Old  One Million Capital / Half Million Bank DepositOne Million Capital / Half Million Bank Deposit  Membership for regular license - Private (200)Membership for regular license - Private (200) - Company (30)- Company (30)  Branch (10)Branch (10)  Regular (30)Regular (30)  Maximum Number – 1000Maximum Number – 1000  Validity LTO (2 years)Validity LTO (2 years)  Renewal LTO (60 daysRenewal LTO (60 days before expiry date)before expiry date)  Firearm Ratio (1:2) – Maximum Firearms (500Firearm Ratio (1:2) – Maximum Firearms (500 units)units)  Guards Ammo (25)Guards Ammo (25)  SG qualification (18 but not more than 50)SG qualification (18 but not more than 50)
    19. 19. SECURITY GUARD MOTTOSECURITY GUARD MOTTO ““OBSERVE AND REPORT”OBSERVE AND REPORT” PRIMARY DUTY “PREVENTION OF CRIMES”
    20. 20. TYPES OF SECURITY GUARDTYPES OF SECURITY GUARD FORCEFORCE 1.1. Company Guard ForceCompany Guard Force 2.2. Private Guard ForcePrivate Guard Force 3.3. Government Guard ForceGovernment Guard Force TYPES OF SECURITY PERSONNEL 1. Security guards 2. Security officers 3. Security agents
    21. 21. CLASSIFICATION OF SECURITYCLASSIFICATION OF SECURITY GUARDGUARD  In-house or proprietaryIn-house or proprietary  ContractContract  Public securityPublic security
    22. 22. TYPES OF SECURITYTYPES OF SECURITY 1.1. Personnel securityPersonnel security 2.2. Document securityDocument security 3.3. Physical securityPhysical security CIA TRIAD OF INFORMATION SECURITY 1. Confidentiality 2. Integrity 3. Availability
    23. 23. Element of Physical SecurityElement of Physical Security 1.1. ObstaclesObstacles 2.2. AlarmsAlarms 3.3. Security responseSecurity response
    24. 24. KINDS OF FENCEKINDS OF FENCE  Plain view fencePlain view fence Solid fenceSolid fence
    25. 25. KINDS SECURITYKINDS SECURITY  Human securityHuman security  School securitySchool security  Hotel securityHotel security  Bank securityBank security  Industrial securityIndustrial security  Mall securityMall security  There are other kinds of securityThere are other kinds of security
    26. 26. 2 BASIC PILARS OF HUMAN2 BASIC PILARS OF HUMAN SECURITYSECURITY 1. Freedom from want1. Freedom from want 2. Freedom from fear2. Freedom from fear
    27. 27. 2 CATEGORIES OF SECURITY2 CATEGORIES OF SECURITY HAZARDSHAZARDS 1.1. Human hazardsHuman hazards 2.2. Natural hazardsNatural hazards
    28. 28. TYPES OF HAZARDSTYPES OF HAZARDS 1.1. Physical hazardsPhysical hazards 2.2. Chemical hazardsChemical hazards 3.3. Biological hazardsBiological hazards 4.4. Ergonomics hazardsErgonomics hazards
    29. 29. TYPES OF PILFERERTYPES OF PILFERER  Casual pilfererCasual pilferer  Systematic pilfererSystematic pilferer
    30. 30. KINDS OF SECURITY BARRIERSKINDS OF SECURITY BARRIERS  Natural barriersNatural barriers  Human barriersHuman barriers  Animal barriersAnimal barriers  Property barriersProperty barriers  Energy barriersEnergy barriers
    31. 31. SECURITY PROTECTIVESECURITY PROTECTIVE MEASURESMEASURES  Top guardTop guard  TowersTowers  Guard houseGuard house  Sign and noticeSign and notice  Security lightingSecurity lighting  AlarmsAlarms  Pass system (ID)Pass system (ID)
    32. 32. VIP SECURITYVIP SECURITY  VIPVIP  PersonnelPersonnel  EscortEscort  BodyguardBodyguard  DetectiveDetective  WatchmanWatchman  Security multiplierSecurity multiplier
    33. 33. ORGANIZATION OF VIPORGANIZATION OF VIP SECURITYSECURITY  Area securityArea security  Perimeter securityPerimeter security  Advance securityAdvance security  Close-in securityClose-in security  Reserve securityReserve security  Route securityRoute security
    34. 34. BASICBASIC SECURITY ANDSECURITY AND SAFETY CONCEPTSSAFETY CONCEPTS
    35. 35. ACCIDENT is usually a contact with a source of energy above the threshold limit of the body or structure.
    36. 36. THE HIDDEN COSTS OFTHE HIDDEN COSTS OF ACCIDENTSACCIDENTS
    37. 37. CAUSES OF ACCIDENTS  Unsafe Acts  Unsafe Conditions
    38. 38. UNSAFE ACT is a violation of an accepted safe procedure which could permit the occurrence of an accident.
    39. 39. EXAMPLES OF UNSAFE ACTSEXAMPLES OF UNSAFE ACTS  Operating without authority.  Making safety devices inoperable.  Servicing equipment in motion.  Failure to warn or secure.
    40. 40. UNSAFE CONDITIONUNSAFE CONDITION a hazardous physical condition or circumstance which could permit the occurrence of an accident.
    41. 41. EXAMPLES OF UNSAFE CONDITIONS  Inadequate guards or protection.  Defective tools, equipment, materials.  Excessive noise.  Inadequate illumination or ventilation.
    42. 42. AccidentAccident PyramidPyramid 1 LTI 10 Minor Injuries Property Damage 600 Near- Misses 30 1969 Accident Ratio Study F.E. Bird
    43. 43. SAFETYSAFETY is the CONTROL of HAZARDS to attain an acceptable level of RISK..
    44. 44. FIRE TECHNOLOGY SECURITY AND SAFETY
    45. 45. P.D. NO. 1185 OF THE PHILIPPINES AND REGULATIONS
    46. 46. PRESIDENTIAL DECREE NO. 1185 FIRE CODE OF THE PHILIPPINES WHEREAS, death and injury to persons and loss and damage to property by fire have reached alarming proportion that the economic and social gains of the society are being continually undermined; WHEREAS, in order to effect a meaningful reduction of the alarming fire losses, there is a need to develop national consciousness and involvement of all persons in the prevention and suppression of fire; WHEREAS, fire prevention and suppression require the adoption of uniform fire safety standards, the incorporation of fire safety construction and provision of protective and safety devices in buildings and structures;
    47. 47. WHEREAS, there is an urgent need for an emergency primarily responsible for the implementation and coordination of the activities of all sectors of society on fire safety, prevention and suppression. WHEREAS, in order to effectively implement all efforts to minimize the occurrence of fires and their destructive effects, full financial, equipment and personnel support by the government and the private sector in necessary…
    48. 48. DECLARATION OF POLICIES The following are declared policies of the State: a. The government, with the cooperation of the private sector, shall develop and promulgate sets of standards and regulations taking into consideration the latest development in fire technology suitable to Philippine conditions; b. Fire prevention and safety shall be given equal, if not greater emphasis as the suppression, or extinguishment of fire. Fire prevention shall be undertaken continuously involving all sectors of the community.
    49. 49. c. The Fire Service of the Integrated National Police shall endeavor to respond to all fires before they reach critical and conflagration stages. Towards this end, the organization, administration and operation of the Fire Service shall be improved and developed, its personnel and equipment augmented and effective fire alarm systems set-up; and d. The Fire Service shall be professionalized. For this purpose, educational institutions shall endeavor to include in their curricula, courses on fire technology and fire protection engineering.
    50. 50. RULE 1 – GENERAL PROVISIONS DIVISION 1 – GENERAL SEC. 1.103 REQUIRED FIRE SAFETY PROGRAM / MEASURES A. In addition to the requirements provided for in Sec. 1.102, lessees or occupants of buildings, structure or facilities shall observe all pertinent fire safety measures as set forth in P.D.1185 and in subsequent Rules of the Fire Code. B. All occupants or lessees of buildings, structures or facilities shall organize themselves and develop and implement fire safety programs to include among others, fire prevention in the premises, notification of the fire service to the existence of a fire, evacuation of persons and initial fire fighting. The building owner shall take the initiative of formulating the fire safety program for his building and of organizing the occupants to implement the program.
    51. 51. THE BEST WAY TO PREVENT THE OCCURRENCE OF FIRE IS… “TO HAVE NO FIRE AT ALL”
    52. 52.  EDUCATION / ORIENTATION  ESTABLISHMENT OF FIRE BRIGADE ORGANIZATION  EXERCISE / TRAINING - FIRE DRILL - HANDS-ON FIRE EXTINGUISHER THRU:
    53. 53. IGNITION SOURCES OF FIRE ELECTRICAL - 23% SMOKING - 18% FRICTION - 10% OVERHEATED MATERIALS - 8% HOT SURFACE - 7% BURNER FLAMES - 7% COMBUSTION SPARKS - 5% SPONTANEOUS IGNITION - 4% CUTTING & WELDING - 4% EXPOSURE - 3% INCENDIARISM - 3% MECHANICAL SPARKS - 2% MOLTEN SUBSTANCES - 2% CHEMICAL ACTION - 1% STATIC SPARKS - 1% LIGHTING - 1% MISCELLANEOUS - 1%
    54. 54. Chemistry and Physics ofChemistry and Physics of FireFire FIREFIRE is a rapid, self-sustainingis a rapid, self-sustaining oxidationoxidation process accompanied by theprocess accompanied by the evolution of heat and lightevolution of heat and light Oxidation - the act or process of combining with oxygen. -is the combination of combustible materials (fuel) with oxygen in the presence of enough heat.
    55. 55. Products of FireProducts of Fire  FlameFlame  HeatHeat  SmokeSmoke  Fire GasesFire Gases THERMAL NON-THERMAL
    56. 56. Fire GasesFire Gases  Carbon MonoxideCarbon Monoxide  Carbon DioxideCarbon Dioxide  AmmoniaAmmonia  Hydrogen ChlorideHydrogen Chloride  Sulfur DioxideSulfur Dioxide
    57. 57. Classes of FireClasses of Fire Class AClass A Occur in ordinary combustibleOccur in ordinary combustible materials such as wood, paper,materials such as wood, paper, rugs and rubbish.rugs and rubbish. Class BClass B Occur in vapor-air mixture over theOccur in vapor-air mixture over the surface of flammable liquids, such assurface of flammable liquids, such as gasoline, oil, thinners.gasoline, oil, thinners.
    58. 58. Classes of FireClasses of Fire Class CClass C Occur in or near energized electricalOccur in or near energized electrical equipment where non-conductingequipment where non-conducting extinguishing agents must be used.extinguishing agents must be used. Class DClass D Occur in combustible metals, such as magnesium,Occur in combustible metals, such as magnesium, potassium, powdered aluminum, zinc.potassium, powdered aluminum, zinc.
    59. 59. FUEL OXYGEN HEAT TRIANGLE OF FIRE
    60. 60. FUEL OXYGEN HEAT CHEMICAL CHAIN REACTION TETRAHEDRON
    61. 61. INCIPIENT PHASE – or beginning of fire • oxygen is plentiful • Temp has not built to high peak • Breathing not difficult • Direct water application • Ventilation: not a problem • Little steam production
    62. 62. FREE BURNING PHASE – fire begins to deplete the room’s oxygen supply and temperature greatly increased. • Fire has involved more fuels • Oxygen supply is being depleted • Heat accumulates at ceiling • SCBA is a must • Ventilation: not a definite need • Good steam production
    63. 63. SMOLDERING PHASE – after oxygen content of the air falls below 15%, the fire enters a smoldering phase where flame may cease but dense smoke and heat completely fill the room. • Oxygen supply is below 15% • Temp is very high • Normal breathing not possible • Backdraft hazard • Fire extinguishment: indirect method • Ventilation is a must
    64. 64. CONDUCTION – transmission of heat from one substance to another by direct contact from molecules. CONVECTION – transmission of heat through contact with molecules of hot gases when molecules of gases move upward and transmits to any other surface. RADIATION – transmission of heat from a source even through space.
    65. 65. Fire Control MethodsFire Control Methods  CoolingCooling  SmotheringSmothering  StarvationStarvation  InhibitionInhibition
    66. 66. ORGANIZATION, TRAINING AND PROCEDURES Those whose duty is to fight fires comes from three lines of defense: 1.Personnel working in the area where the fire starts 2.The worker fire brigade 3.The public fire brigade It is strongly advised that all personnel be instructed in special session and that fire drill is needed at least twice a year in which they can practice what they have been taught
    67. 67. Is an appliance designated to be carried and operated by hand containing an extinguisher medium which can be expelled by the action of internal pressure and be directed on to a fire.
    68. 68. lockpin Antitamper seal handle
    69. 69. Pressure gauge
    70. 70. Activation Squeeze Handle (looks like the open mouth of an alligator)
    71. 71. Nozzle or horn
    72. 72. Inspector check tag Hose or coupling
    73. 73. Position and legibility of faceplate Cylinder should be in good condition
    74. 74. Tag showing last recharge and inspection date
    75. 75.  Be kept fully charged and in their designated places  Be located along normal paths of travel  Not to be obstructed or obscured from view  Not to be mounted higher than 5’ (1.5m.) to the top of the extinguisher, if they weigh 40 lbs (18kg.) or less but heavier, not more than 3.5’ (1m.)
    76. 76. Report used extinguishers Watch for tampering
    77. 77. Recharge properly Do not mix dry chemicals
    78. 78. Watch for corrosion Keep nozzle clean
    79. 79. Check for low pressure Conduct regular inspection
    80. 80. Types of Portable FX • Carbon Dioxide • Dry Chemical (Ordinary & Multi- Purpose) • Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) • Halon 1211 • Dry Powder
    81. 81. General Operating Steps • PULL the pin. • AIM the nozzle. • SQUEZZE the lever. • SWEEP from side-to-side.
    82. 82. ELIMINATING SABOTAGE ANDELIMINATING SABOTAGE AND PREVENTING LOSS FROM INSIDE ANDPREVENTING LOSS FROM INSIDE AND OUTSIDE FORCES BY STRENGTHENINGOUTSIDE FORCES BY STRENGTHENING SECURITY CONTROLSECURITY CONTROL The aim of school security is to minimize theThe aim of school security is to minimize the occurrence and consequence of criminaloccurrence and consequence of criminal acts against both the school communityacts against both the school community and its assets.and its assets.
    83. 83. “Our schools have been becoming fortresses over the last two to three decades”
    84. 84. Identified security risks covered byIdentified security risks covered by the policy:the policy:  Harm to staff and students from a criminalHarm to staff and students from a criminal act, committed by unauthorized persons onact, committed by unauthorized persons on site;site;  Theft/damage of resources due to break andTheft/damage of resources due to break and enter incidents;enter incidents;  Malicious damage to the inside and outsideMalicious damage to the inside and outside of buildings; andof buildings; and  Arson damage to buildings.Arson damage to buildings.
    85. 85. The risk of crime against schools is best mitigated when allThe risk of crime against schools is best mitigated when all of the following elements of security philosophy areof the following elements of security philosophy are adopted:adopted:  All potential major security threats or risks areAll potential major security threats or risks are identified and assessed;identified and assessed;  Schools plan for addressing these risks;Schools plan for addressing these risks;  A holistic approach is taken, including a broadA holistic approach is taken, including a broad combination of strategies and systems for riskcombination of strategies and systems for risk treatment and management;treatment and management;  All members of the school community have aAll members of the school community have a part to play in security outcomes; andpart to play in security outcomes; and  There is leadership shown within the schoolThere is leadership shown within the school community to engage others and drivecommunity to engage others and drive successful outcomes.successful outcomes.
    86. 86. 1)1) School Security PlanningSchool Security Planning 2)2) Security Risk Management StrategiesSecurity Risk Management Strategies 3)3) School Based Security Policy and ProcedureSchool Based Security Policy and Procedure 4)4) Alarm Systems and Electronic SecurityAlarm Systems and Electronic Security a)a) Security Camera SurveillanceSecurity Camera Surveillance b)b) Maintenance and RepairsMaintenance and Repairs 5)5) Security Patrols and Alarm RespondingSecurity Patrols and Alarm Responding The procedures will include:The procedures will include:
    87. 87. The procedures will include:The procedures will include: 6)6) Access ControlAccess Control a)a) Protection of PersonsProtection of Persons b)b) Personal IdentificationPersonal Identification c)c) Key ManagementKey Management d)d) LocksLocks e)e) GatesGates
    88. 88. 7)7) Physical SecurityPhysical Security a)a) LightingLighting b)b) SignageSignage c)c) Protecting EquipmentProtecting Equipment d)d) Crime Prevention Through Environmental DesignCrime Prevention Through Environmental Design e)e) TheThe Defence in DepthDefence in Depth PrinciplePrinciple f)f) Security Design GuidelineSecurity Design Guideline g)g) HousekeepingHousekeeping The procedures will include:The procedures will include:
    89. 89. 8)8) Document SecurityDocument Security 9)9) Cyber CrimesCyber Crimes 10)10) Personnel Security and IncidentPersonnel Security and Incident ManagementManagement a)a) Hostile People, Trespass and wilful DisturbanceHostile People, Trespass and wilful Disturbance 11)11) Crime Prevention StrategiesCrime Prevention Strategies The procedures will include:The procedures will include:
    90. 90. 12)12) Support For SchoolsSupport For Schools a)a) School Security Advisory ProgramSchool Security Advisory Program b)b) School Security Handbook and Self HelpSchool Security Handbook and Self Help ToolsTools c)c) Alarm System Monitoring and MaintenanceAlarm System Monitoring and Maintenance d)d) Security StandardsSecurity Standards e)e) Productive PartnershipsProductive Partnerships f)f) Security Patrols and Alarm ResponseSecurity Patrols and Alarm Response g)g) School Watch ProgramSchool Watch Program The procedures will include:The procedures will include:
    91. 91. TECHNOLOGY:TECHNOLOGY:  ACCESS CONTROLACCESS CONTROL  BIOMETRICSBIOMETRICS  CCTV & CAMERASCCTV & CAMERAS  COMMUNICATIONCOMMUNICATION GADGETSGADGETS
    92. 92. TECHNOLOGY:TECHNOLOGY: Today’s security technologies includeToday’s security technologies include closed circuit television, access control, handheldclosed circuit television, access control, handheld identification scanners, biometrics and so much moreidentification scanners, biometrics and so much more ACCESS CONTROL:ACCESS CONTROL:  Means providing entry to locked doors onlyMeans providing entry to locked doors only to those carrying authorized cardsto those carrying authorized cards  The technology eliminates the need toThe technology eliminates the need to replace locks every time an eventreplace locks every time an event compromises securitycompromises security  The system can also add convenience forThe system can also add convenience for staffstaff  They are not foolproofThey are not foolproof
    93. 93. TECHNOLOGY:TECHNOLOGY: Today’s security technologies includeToday’s security technologies include closed circuit television, access control, handheldclosed circuit television, access control, handheld identification scanners, biometrics and so much moreidentification scanners, biometrics and so much more BIOMETRICS:BIOMETRICS:  Uses technology to measure bodyUses technology to measure body characteristics, such as fingers, hands, eyescharacteristics, such as fingers, hands, eyes (iris), faces or voices, as a means of(iris), faces or voices, as a means of identificationidentification  Hand-geometry systems use the size andHand-geometry systems use the size and shape of the hand and fingers to verifyshape of the hand and fingers to verify identityidentity  May offer more security than mostMay offer more security than most educational facilities neededucational facilities need
    94. 94. TECHNOLOGY:TECHNOLOGY: Today’s security technologies includeToday’s security technologies include closed circuit television, access control, handheldclosed circuit television, access control, handheld identification scanners, biometrics and so much moreidentification scanners, biometrics and so much more CCTV and CAMERASCCTV and CAMERAS ::  They are other advancements inThey are other advancements in security technology helping to makesecurity technology helping to make schools safer and more secure todayschools safer and more secure today  Camera systems are typicallyCamera systems are typically monitored by the campus securitymonitored by the campus security departmentdepartment
    95. 95. CRIME PREVENTION THROUGHCRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CPTED)(CPTED)  Premise is that through the effective usePremise is that through the effective use and design of the built environment, thereand design of the built environment, there can be a reduction in the opportunity andcan be a reduction in the opportunity and fear of crime, and result in thefear of crime, and result in the improvement in the quality of lifeimprovement in the quality of life  It is a powerful concept that may be usedIt is a powerful concept that may be used to improve the productive use of spaceto improve the productive use of space
    96. 96. CRIME PREVENTION THROUGHCRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CPTED)(CPTED)  Understanding the ThreatUnderstanding the Threat  Integrated school security measures includeIntegrated school security measures include prevention, control, detection, and intervention inprevention, control, detection, and intervention in order to be comprehensive and effectiveorder to be comprehensive and effective  CPTED can make a direct impact on reducingCPTED can make a direct impact on reducing thethe outsideoutside external threat through use of naturalexternal threat through use of natural access control, surveillance, territorialityaccess control, surveillance, territoriality boundary definition, management andboundary definition, management and maintenance strategiesmaintenance strategies
    97. 97. CRIME PREVENTION THROUGHCRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CPTED)(CPTED)  TheThe internalinternal threats can be primarilythreats can be primarily deterred through policy and proceduredeterred through policy and procedure strategies and management techniques,strategies and management techniques, and not as much on physical designand not as much on physical design
    98. 98. CRIME PREVENTION THROUGHCRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CPTED)(CPTED)  Safe School Design involves four keySafe School Design involves four key areas that should include securityareas that should include security layering/defensible space planninglayering/defensible space planning practices:practices:  Site DesignSite Design  Building designBuilding design  Interior spacesInterior spaces  Systems and equipmentSystems and equipment
    99. 99. CRIME PREVENTION THROUGHCRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CPTED)(CPTED) Site DesignSite Design -- includes features of: Landscaping, Exteriorincludes features of: Landscaping, Exterior Pedestrian Routes, Vehicular Routes andPedestrian Routes, Vehicular Routes and Parking, Recreational AreasParking, Recreational Areas Building designBuilding design featuresfeatures -- Building organization, Exterior coveredBuilding organization, Exterior covered corridors, Points of entry, Enclosedcorridors, Points of entry, Enclosed exterior spaces, Ancillary buildings, Walls,exterior spaces, Ancillary buildings, Walls, windows, doors, roofs, and Lightingwindows, doors, roofs, and Lighting
    100. 100. CRIME PREVENTION THROUGHCRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CPTED)(CPTED) Interior spacesInterior spaces -- include features of: Lobby and receptioninclude features of: Lobby and reception areas Corridors; Toilets and bathrooms;areas Corridors; Toilets and bathrooms; Stairs and stairwells; Cafeterias,Stairs and stairwells; Cafeterias, Auditoriums, Gyms; Libraries and mediaAuditoriums, Gyms; Libraries and media centers; Classrooms; Locker rooms; Labs,centers; Classrooms; Locker rooms; Labs, shops, music, computer rooms; andshops, music, computer rooms; and Administrative areasAdministrative areas
    101. 101. CRIME PREVENTION THROUGHCRIME PREVENTION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CPTED)(CPTED) Systems and equipmentSystems and equipment -- will include features suchwill include features such as: Alarms andas: Alarms and surveillance systems; Firesurveillance systems; Fire control; HVAC &control; HVAC & mechanical equipment;mechanical equipment; Vending machines; WaterVending machines; Water fountains; Elevators;fountains; Elevators; Telephone and infoTelephone and info systems.systems.
    102. 102. HANDLING ANDHANDLING AND PROSECUTION OFPROSECUTION OF SABOTEURS, FRAUDSTERSSABOTEURS, FRAUDSTERS AND DRUG USERS/PUSHERSAND DRUG USERS/PUSHERS IN SCHOOL SECURITYIN SCHOOL SECURITY MANAGEMENTMANAGEMENT
    103. 103. THE BASIC UNDERSTANDING ANDTHE BASIC UNDERSTANDING AND APPLICATION OF SECURITYAPPLICATION OF SECURITY “IN PRINCIPLE, THE BEST SECURITY IS WHEN NOT A SINGLE UNTOWARD INCIDENT HAPPENED DURING ITS’ WATCH. THE SECURITY SYSTEM APPLIED MUST BE AN EFFECTIVE DETERRENCE TO ANY POSSIBLE CRIMINAL OFFENSES.” “DETERRENCE AS PREVENTION, IN ANY COMPARISON, IS BETTER THAN SOLVING AN INCIDENT BECAUSE ALLOWING AN INCIDENT TO HAPPEN AND BE ABLE TO SOLVE IT SUBSEQUENTLY DOES NOT GIVE AN IMPRESSION OF GOOD SERVICE.” “IN TERMS OF COST, PREVENTION IS LESS EXPENSIVE. TALKING OF COLATERAL DAMAGE, IT IS NIL. DAY TO DAY ACTIVITIES ARE NORMAL AND NO UNNECESSARY DISRUPTION THEREBY INSURING THE GOOD QUALITY OF LIFE.”
    104. 104. EFFECTIVE SECURITYEFFECTIVE SECURITY SYSTEMSYSTEM 1. WELL-EDUCATED AND TRAINED PERSONNEL 2. WELL-EQUIPPED GUARDS (WEAPONS, COMMUNICATION, LIFT, ETC) 3. TAKING ADVANTAGE OF PHYSICAL SECURITY (NATURAL VS MAN-MADE)
    105. 105. NATURAL 1. RIVER BANK 2. CLIFF 3. WATER 4. HILL MAN-MADE 1. FENCE 2. BUILDING 3. ENGINEERED BARRIERS 4. GATE (entrance & exit) 5. SAFETY PROCEDURE
    106. 106. THREATS TO SCHOOLTHREATS TO SCHOOL SECURITYSECURITY 1. TERRORISM 2. COMMON CRIMES 3. DRUG ABUSE & PUSHING 4. JUVENILE DELIQUENCIES 5. PUBLIC DISTURBANCES
    107. 107. TERRORISMTERRORISM 1. Bombing 2. Assassination/mass killing 3. Any form of scaring tactics in keeping the public anxiety. Ex: JI, Al Jaeda 4. Fire/conflagration
    108. 108. COMMON CRIMESCOMMON CRIMES 1. Kidnapping 2. Robberies (snatching, hold-up, etc) 3. Theft (pickpocketing, etc.) 4. Killing (murder, homicide, etc.) 5. Rape 6. Physical injuries (quarrel, drunkenness, altercations, etc.)
    109. 109. DRUG ABUSEDRUG ABUSE (VICTIM AND PUSHING)(VICTIM AND PUSHING) 1. Students 2. Out of school youths/dropouts 3. Student and outsider dealings or small-time trafficking
    110. 110. JUVENILE DELIQUENCIESJUVENILE DELIQUENCIES 1. Gang war 2. Fraternity rivalry 3. Psychological (a transition to manhood) PUBLIC DISTURBANCES 1. Picketts/Strikes/Lockout s 2. Demonstrations/Rallies
    111. 111. SECURITY MANAGEMENTSECURITY MANAGEMENT 1. IN-HOUSE ORGANIZATION 2. PROCUREMENT OF SERVICE PROVIDER
    112. 112. IN-HOUSE ORGANIZATION • 30-GUARDS MINIMUM (either Company Guards or Government Security Forces) PROCUREMENT • BID FOR SERVICE PROVIDER (Private Security Agencies)
    113. 113. TYPES OF SECURITYTYPES OF SECURITY SERVICE PROVIDERSERVICE PROVIDER 1. Private Security Agency for property and persons within an area/facility contracted. 2. Private Detective Agency for personal security protection service.
    114. 114. MODE OF SECURITYMODE OF SECURITY APPLICATIONAPPLICATION 1. PREVENTION 2. SUPPRESSION
    115. 115. SECURITY PREVENTIONSECURITY PREVENTION MODEMODE 1. EVALUATION PHASE 2. IMPLEMENTATION PHASE
    116. 116. EVALUATION PHASEEVALUATION PHASE 1. Conduct of Security Survey 2. Determination of personnel to be employed and fund sourcing 3. Implication in relations to peace and order, local and national laws, tradition and culture, etc.
    117. 117. IMPLEMENTATION PHASEIMPLEMENTATION PHASE 1. Procurement of security services 2. Construction of physical security system, if necessary. 3. Set-up the security system in place with personnel, equipment, facilities, etc.
    118. 118. SECURITY SUPPRESSIONSECURITY SUPPRESSION MODEMODE 1. Application of School Rules and Regulations 2. Fire and/or Police Assistance 3. Citizen’s Arrest 4. Rule of Evidence and Investigation 5. Prosecutions
    119. 119. CITIZEN’S ARRESTCITIZEN’S ARREST 1. Commission of Crime a. About to be committed b. Being committed c. Had just been committed 2. Personal knowledge of the crime 3. Fugitive of the Law
    120. 120. KINDS OF EVIDENCEKINDS OF EVIDENCE 1. Direct 2. Circumstantial
    121. 121. INVESTIGATIONINVESTIGATION OPERATIONSOPERATIONS 1. Direct questioning 2. Ocular inspection 3. Crime scene operation and laboratory examination 4. Records, background and social investigations.
    122. 122. CRIME SCENE PROTECTIONCRIME SCENE PROTECTION 1. Never touch any evidence because each evidence has a story to tell 2. Help secure the crime scene until the police line is installed by the police 3. Always call the police whenever there is a crime incident 4. Drive the crowd away from the crime scene so as not to disturb the evidences
    123. 123. HANDLING OF SUSPECTHANDLING OF SUSPECT 1. Observe the Constitutional Rights of the suspect/accused. 2. Non-violent – Keep talking to the suspect and get a possible cooperation without offending him while calling and/or waiting for the police. – Take note of what the suspect is telling you, jot down those relevant statements and evaluate it later which may have bearing to the case in progress. – Turn-over the suspect(s), witnesses and evidences to the police and have it recorded and/or receipted.
    124. 124. 3. VIOLENT – Use necessary force to subdue the suspect or call and wait for the police to do the job. – If subdued, hogtie and lock the suspect in a room, if any. – Apply the above-enumerated guides in handling non-violent suspect, when he becomes sober.
    125. 125. INVESTIGATION ANDINVESTIGATION AND PROSECUTIONPROSECUTION 1. In urban areas, there is always a prosecutor available during non-working hours as duty inquest officer wherein which the police usually brings the suspect to avoid the possible delay of the case and the possible counter-charge of arbitrary detention. 2. In areas where there are no inquest prosecutor, the police does the investigation, determines the prima facie evidence and then prepares the filing of the case before the Prosecutor’s Office. 3. Preliminary investigation will be conducted later by the assigned prosecutor to determine the probable cause as basis for filing of the case in court.
    126. 126. COORDINATION READINESSCOORDINATION READINESS 1. For crime, call the police 2. For illegal drugs, call the PDEA or the PNP AIDSOTF 3. For fire, call the BFP 4. For bomb, call the police or the PNP EOD or the AFP EOD 5. Do not limit the call for assistance for the barangay officials where your school is located and you may have the incident recorded in their own blotter. 6. Maintain the telephone numbers of all of the above offices
    127. 127. ELECTRICAL SECURITY AND SAFETY
    128. 128. Electricity usually does not look hazardous. Many people have been electrocuted when they thought they knew what they were doing. Today almost all industries and manufacturing relies on electricity in the workplace – from lighting to operating complex machinery.
    129. 129. Our personal safety depends on understanding and practicing three (3) things: o Basic principles of electrical safety o Safe work practices o Correct response to emergencies
    130. 130. Basic Electrical TermsBasic Electrical Terms VOLTAGE (E) The difference in potentials between two points (measured in volts). Conversion: 1 kilovolt = 1000 volts
    131. 131. Basic Electrical TermsBasic Electrical Terms CURRENT (I) The movement or flow of electric charges (measured in amperes). Conversion: 1 ampere = 1000 milliamperes
    132. 132. Basic Electrical TermsBasic Electrical Terms RESISTANCE (R) The property of material which opposes the flow of electric current (measured in ohms).
    133. 133. Basic Electrical TermsBasic Electrical Terms OHM’S LAW The current flowing in a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage and inversely proportional to the resistance.
    134. 134. OHM’S LAWOHM’S LAW R E I THE MAGIC TRIANGLE R = E / I I = E / R E = R x I
    135. 135. Basic Electrical TermsBasic Electrical Terms CONDUCTOR Permits electrons or electric current to flow through it.
    136. 136. Basic Electrical TermsBasic Electrical Terms INSULATOR Used to provide barrier around a conductor (to prevent accidental contact).
    137. 137. Insulators have a very high resistance to the flow of electricity and are used to cover wiring and other electrical components Conductors have low resistance to electricity and are used for wires, switches and electrical connections. Semiconductors can change their resistance to act as either a conductor or an insulator. They are used to make computer microchips.
    138. 138. Basic Electrical TermsBasic Electrical Terms ELECTRIC CIRCUIT Any combination of a conductor and a source of electricity connected together to permit electrons to travel in a continuous stream.
    139. 139. Electricity may take multiple paths, flowing through all possible circuits. The greatest amount of current will flow through the path of least resistance, or lowest impedance. Any part of your body that accidentally bridges the gap between two different voltage levels creates a new electrical circuit, and your body may provide the path of least resistance to the ground.
    140. 140. Equipment grounding connects all conductive materials that enclose electrical lines. Electrical system grounding protects the circuit from voltages that may come from lightning or line upsurges. Bypassing grounds or careless handling of grounding connections can result in electrical fires and fatal accidents.
    141. 141. A circuit-protection device (CPD) protects against circuit malfunction by preventing too much current from passing from the power source through the rest of the circuit. If current flow exceeds a CPD’s rated max amp, the device will stop the flow by melting, tripping or opening to break the circuit.
    142. 142. Circuit-protection devices: o Fuses o Circuit breakers o Ground-fault circuit-interrupters (GFCIs) A GFCI is a supersensitive, rapid-action power switch which breaks a circuit when there is more than 5 milliamps difference between the hot wire and the neutral or grounded conductors.
    143. 143. Current Overload:  equipment malfunctions or overheats  too many electrical appliances are on the same circuit  there is a temporary power surge in the circuit from lightning or electric motor start up  insulation between two conductors melts or wears through, creating a short circuit back to the power source
    144. 144. Resetting Circuit-Protection Devices:  replace the fuse or reset the breaker  wait a while to see if the power stays on  check for any smoke, heat or unusual odor. If you notice anything out of order, de-energize the circuit asap.  don’t replace the fuse or reset the breaker a second time until you find and correct the problem.
    145. 145. Rules for Circuit Protection  do not create an octopus connection  never bypass, bridge nor disable any circuit protection device  never replace any circuit-protection device in an energized or live circuit  always be sure that the power is safely off  replace a fuse with an exact duplicate; same rating. Too high – do not protect the circuit; too low – could explode and shower you with pieces of glass or metal  use fuse pliers to remove fuses  wear safety glasses for added protection  be sure the markings on the old and new fuses match.
    146. 146. Lockout/tagout protects you from the unexpected start-up of machines or release of stored energy during service or maintenance. LOCKOUT is blocking the flow of energy from the power source to the equipment – and keeping it blocked out.
    147. 147. In a lockout, place a lock on a disconnect switch, circuit breaker, valve handle to make sure it cannot be moved from the OFF or closed position. In a tagout, you attach a written warning tag at the place where the equipment would be energized, such as at the ON switch or on a valve that opens a supply line.
    148. 148.  Electrical – can be a direct source  Hydraulic – uses fluid under pressure  Pneumatic – uses air under pressure  Kinetic – the energy created in a moving object  Potential – stored energy such as the energy in capacitors, compressed air, hydraulics and springs  Pressurized liquids or gases – including steam and chemicals present in pipes and supply lines  Any other energy – including thermal or mechanical energy, gravity, pressurized systems and elevated parts ENERGY SOURCES
    149. 149. Employees Responsibilities  Authorized employee – a person who locks out or tags our machinery or equipment in order to service or maintain it.  Affected employee – an employee whose work involves use or operation of equipment under lockout/tagout or who works in the area where service is being performed.
    150. 150. 1. PREPARATION – know the equipment and its energy source before working on it. 2. SHUTDOWN – turn off the equipment 3. ISOLATION – find and isolate every form of energy that the machine uses. This includes pulling fuses, throwing disconnects and capping any secondary sources of energy.
    151. 151. 4. APPLICATION – anything that might restore the flow of energy to the work area must be locked out. In situations where multiple pieces of equipment are being locked, an authorized employee places all keys in a lock box to which each employee attaches his or her personal lock.
    152. 152. 5. CONTROL – even after equipment is locked out, you must control stored energy.  Relieve, disconnect or restrain any residual hazardous energy that could be present  Check that all moving parts have stopped  Relieve trapped pressure  Install ground wires to discharge electrical capacitors  Block or support elevated equipment  Check continuously if energy build-up is possible.
    153. 153. 6. VERIFY  energy source is shut down, blocked off, controlled and locked out  warn everyone in the lockout area and be sure they are moved to a safe place.  activate all controls that might restore power to the machine you are working on.  if equipment does not start, restore all controls to the OFF position and begin to work.
    154. 154. 1. Restore Work Area  Remove all tools  Double-check all equipment components  Replace all safety features, such as machine guards  Close access panels that were opened to perform service on equipment
    155. 155. 2. Notify Personnel Notify all employees that LOTO devices are being removed. Remove employees from the area or make sure they are a safe distance from the equipment, 3. Remove LOTO DevicesThe person who placed each device must be the one to remove it. If someone who placed a LOTO device is not present, notify your supervisor who will follow specific procedures. Never remove it yourself.
    156. 156. After all devices are removed, tell affected employees that LOTO is ended and that the equipment is being re- energized. Restarting the Equipment…
    157. 157. KNOW THE MACHINES AND THEIR POWER SOURCES Some may have more than one source of power. Reminder…
    158. 158. Security ManagementSecurity Management DR. MILLER F. PECKLEYDR. MILLER F. PECKLEY VP-ADMINISTRATIONVP-ADMINISTRATION
    159. 159. Preventing and ProperPreventing and Proper Handling School CrimesHandling School Crimes and Violent Behaviorsand Violent Behaviors
    160. 160. As a school resourceAs a school resource officer, administrator orofficer, administrator or educator your firsteducator your first responsibility is toresponsibility is to ensure your students,ensure your students, staff, faculty, parentsstaff, faculty, parents and guests are alwaysand guests are always
    161. 161. INTENT OPPORTUNITY CAPABILIT Y TRIAD OF CRIMESTRIAD OF CRIMES
    162. 162. Without Safe andWithout Safe and Secured School,Secured School, it is difficult, ifit is difficult, if not impossiblenot impossible for learning tofor learning to take place.take place. -- Ronald D. Stephens EdDRonald D. Stephens EdD
    163. 163. How do we preventHow do we prevent crimes and violence tocrimes and violence to happen inside andhappen inside and within the schoolwithin the school perimeter?perimeter?
    164. 164. "Safety and Security Begins With You.“"Safety and Security Begins With You.“ Its our responsibility not the soleIts our responsibility not the sole responsibility of the Police or Guardresponsibility of the Police or Guard
    165. 165. The cooperation and involvementThe cooperation and involvement of all members of the communityof all members of the community in a school safety and securityin a school safety and security program isprogram is absolutely necessaryabsolutely necessary..
    166. 166. Edmund Burke (1729-1797)Edmund Burke (1729-1797) : "The only thing: "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil isnecessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."for good men to do nothing."
    167. 167. P I M E CP I M E C
    168. 168. PPlanninglanning IImplementationmplementation MMonitoringonitoring EEvaluationvaluation CControlontrol
    169. 169. Cycle of Safety and SecurityCycle of Safety and Security PlanningPlanning Preparedness Response Prevention Recovery
    170. 170. Cycle of Safety and Security PlanningCycle of Safety and Security Planning Prevention/ MitigationPrevention/ Mitigation – addresses– addresses what the school can do to reduce orwhat the school can do to reduce or eliminate risk to life and propertyeliminate risk to life and property PreparednessPreparedness – focuses on the process– focuses on the process of planning for the worst caseof planning for the worst case scenarioscenario ResponseResponse – devotes to the steps to take– devotes to the steps to take during crisis or emergencyduring crisis or emergency RecoveryRecovery – deals with how to restore– deals with how to restore the learning and teachingthe learning and teaching environment after crisis andenvironment after crisis and emergencyemergency
    171. 171. Good plans areGood plans are never finished.never finished. They can beThey can be updated based onupdated based on experience,experience, research andresearch and changingchanging vulnerabilities.vulnerabilities. School may be inSchool may be in various stages ofvarious stages of planning.planning.
    172. 172. Areas to be ConsideredAreas to be Considered • Physical Safety and SecurityPhysical Safety and Security • Protection of Sensitive InformationProtection of Sensitive Information • Safety and Security Awareness/EducationSafety and Security Awareness/Education • Safety and Security InvestigationSafety and Security Investigation • Risk Analysis and ManagementRisk Analysis and Management • Emergency Plan and Crisis ManagementEmergency Plan and Crisis Management • Contractors and Suppliers’ Security and SafetyContractors and Suppliers’ Security and Safety • Safety and Security InspectionSafety and Security Inspection • Loss Control and Prevention Management SystemLoss Control and Prevention Management System • Safety and Security Unit LeadershipSafety and Security Unit Leadership
    173. 173. DEALINGDEALING WITHWITH SCHOOLSCHOOL CRIMESCRIMES andand VIOLENTVIOLENT BEHAVIORBEHAVIOR SS
    174. 174. It is important toIt is important to acknowledge that someacknowledge that some SCHOOL CRIMES andSCHOOL CRIMES and VIOLENT BEHAVIORSVIOLENT BEHAVIORS are more serious than othersare more serious than others and therefore have a greaterand therefore have a greater impact on a school. Thoseimpact on a school. Those acts that cause fear andacts that cause fear and anxiety on the part of theanxiety on the part of the victim and community, asvictim and community, as well as the generalwell as the general population, require specialpopulation, require special attention by schoolattention by school authorities.  authorities.  
    175. 175. PREVENTION STRATEGIESPREVENTION STRATEGIES • Establish clear andEstablish clear and consistent lines ofconsistent lines of communication withcommunication with Safety and SecuritySafety and Security Unit, Office of StudentUnit, Office of Student BehaviorBehavior • Share information withShare information with other administrators,other administrators, OSB Personnel, SSUOSB Personnel, SSU Personnel and thePersonnel and the like.like.
    176. 176. • Know where students tend toKnow where students tend to hang out, and if possible,hang out, and if possible, obtain the name and phoneobtain the name and phone numbers of the establishmentnumbers of the establishment they frequent, and report itthey frequent, and report it to OSB and/or SSU.to OSB and/or SSU. •Develop sources ofDevelop sources of information within theinformation within the community and especially thecommunity and especially the police station.police station.
    177. 177. RESPONSERESPONSE PROCEDURESPROCEDURES
    178. 178. More people are injuredMore people are injured while attempting to breakwhile attempting to break up fights and assaults thanup fights and assaults than during any other type ofduring any other type of activity. This generallyactivity. This generally occurs when the personoccurs when the person trying to break up the fighttrying to break up the fight makes several mistakes.makes several mistakes.
    179. 179. MISTAKE NO. 1MISTAKE NO. 1
    180. 180. Adults tend to runAdults tend to run to fights and onceto fights and once on the sceneon the scene immediately jumpimmediately jump into the middle ofinto the middle of the fight and startthe fight and start to pull theto pull the combatants apart.combatants apart. This action offersThis action offers the fighter that rarethe fighter that rare opportunity to takeopportunity to take a “free shot” at thea “free shot” at the intervener.intervener.
    181. 181. MISTAKE NO. 2MISTAKE NO. 2
    182. 182. By not taking a few momentsBy not taking a few moments upon arrival at the fight scene toupon arrival at the fight scene to do quick analysis of what isdo quick analysis of what is occurring, you attempt tooccurring, you attempt to intervene without knowing whointervene without knowing who the combatants are, or if there isthe combatants are, or if there is weapon involved, or who isweapon involved, or who is winning, or what stage the fight iswinning, or what stage the fight is in, or if this event was staged forin, or if this event was staged for your benefit.your benefit. All of this information isAll of this information is importantimportant in helping you decide thein helping you decide the best course of action to take.best course of action to take.
    183. 183. While the Office ofWhile the Office of Safety and SecuritySafety and Security Unit is responsible forUnit is responsible for coordinating campuscoordinating campus safety and security, thesafety and security, the primary responsibilityprimary responsibility for crime preventionfor crime prevention and personal safetyand personal safety rests with eachrests with each individual.individual.
    184. 184. Common sense is the bestCommon sense is the best defense against crime. Here is adefense against crime. Here is a short list of the basics. short list of the basics. 
    185. 185. 1. Know your surroundings.1. Know your surroundings. Keep theKeep the importantimportant telephonetelephone numbers innumbers in your wallet oryour wallet or save it in yoursave it in your mobile phonemobile phone directorydirectory. . 
    186. 186. 2.2. Do not leave valuable objects visible inDo not leave valuable objects visible in an unattended working area, classroom, oran unattended working area, classroom, or public place.public place. Simple safety andSimple safety and security measuressecurity measures make it too muchmake it too much work for a badwork for a bad guy to do a quickguy to do a quick hit-and-run.hit-and-run.
    187. 187. 3. Report suspicious persons on3. Report suspicious persons on and off-campus.and off-campus. It is naive to think that the Philippine National PoliceIt is naive to think that the Philippine National Police officers, Office of Student Behavior officers, Task Forceofficers, Office of Student Behavior officers, Task Force Safe School personnel, and Safety and Security UnitSafe School personnel, and Safety and Security Unit Officers can catch every criminal; the school and theOfficers can catch every criminal; the school and the streets that surround it comprise a large amount ofstreets that surround it comprise a large amount of space and there are not enough officers to cover everyspace and there are not enough officers to cover every area all the time.area all the time.
    188. 188.   4. Work together.4. Work together. Neighborhoods are saferNeighborhoods are safer when the communitywhen the community takes on thetakes on the responsibility to makeresponsibility to make them safer. Students,them safer. Students, faculty, staff,faculty, staff, administrators, parents,administrators, parents, and guests may reportand guests may report suspicious persons, assuspicious persons, as well as keep eyes open.well as keep eyes open. Safety and security areSafety and security are everybody’s concernseverybody’s concerns..
    189. 189.   5. Remember the saying, "There is5. Remember the saying, "There is always someone watching."always someone watching." This statement is oftenThis statement is often true, and many timestrue, and many times that "someone" could bethat "someone" could be watching you. Be awarewatching you. Be aware of your environmentof your environment and be wary ofand be wary of conspicuous observers.conspicuous observers. Taking personalTaking personal responsibility for yourresponsibility for your safety and the safety ofsafety and the safety of your community is moreyour community is more effective than deployingeffective than deploying a multitude of officersa multitude of officers in your area.in your area.
    190. 190.   6. When riding a taxicab, be alert.  Lock the6. When riding a taxicab, be alert.  Lock the doors. Observe the route the driver takes to getdoors. Observe the route the driver takes to get to your destination.to your destination. Before boarding,Before boarding, askask someone you know to takesomeone you know to take note of the name, plate andnote of the name, plate and body number of the taxicab.body number of the taxicab. If there is no one, pleaseIf there is no one, please note the details yourself afternote the details yourself after boarding the taxi. These mayboarding the taxi. These may be useful later on, especiallybe useful later on, especially at night or in the earlyat night or in the early morning. We know that somemorning. We know that some robbers use taxis whenrobbers use taxis when committing crimes. committing crimes. 
    191. 191. 7. Do not take a taxicab that does not7. Do not take a taxicab that does not have a body number, operator namehave a body number, operator name or address on both sides.or address on both sides. This type ofThis type of taxi is usually used by robbers.taxi is usually used by robbers.
    192. 192. 8. While this list is not all-inclusive,8. While this list is not all-inclusive, the crime rate on- and off-campusthe crime rate on- and off-campus will decrease if we follow thesewill decrease if we follow these common-sense rules.common-sense rules. it is important toit is important to remember that crime can happen anywhere andremember that crime can happen anywhere and anytime. Keep watch and stay safe. anytime. Keep watch and stay safe. 
    193. 193. CRIMESCRIMES CAN BECAN BE PREVENTEDPREVENTED IF WEIF WE WORKWORK TOGETHER.TOGETHER.
    194. 194. CRIME PREVENTION IS EVERYBODY’SCRIME PREVENTION IS EVERYBODY’S BUSINESS AND CONCERNBUSINESS AND CONCERN REPORT ALL CRIMES OR ELSE YOUREPORT ALL CRIMES OR ELSE YOU MIGHT BE THE NEXT VICTIMMIGHT BE THE NEXT VICTIM THANK YOU!!THANK YOU!! MILLER F. PECKLEYMILLER F. PECKLEY
    195. 195. Emergency Planning for SchoolsEmergency Planning for Schools SCHOOL SECURITY DISASTERSCHOOL SECURITY DISASTER MANAGEMENTMANAGEMENT
    196. 196. Commonly-Used Terms inCommonly-Used Terms in Disaster ManagementDisaster Management  DisasterDisaster means a serious disruption of the functioning of ameans a serious disruption of the functioning of a community or society causing widespread human, material,community or society causing widespread human, material, economic or environmental losses.economic or environmental losses.  EmergencyEmergency refers to a sudden occurrence demandingrefers to a sudden occurrence demanding immediate action that may be due to epidemics, natural orimmediate action that may be due to epidemics, natural or technological catastrophes, strife or any other human-madetechnological catastrophes, strife or any other human-made causes.causes.  Disaster ManagementDisaster Management means the range of activities priormeans the range of activities prior to, during, and after the disasters, designed to maintain controlto, during, and after the disasters, designed to maintain control over disasters and to provide a framework for helping at – riskover disasters and to provide a framework for helping at – risk persons and/or communities to avoid, minimize, or recover frompersons and/or communities to avoid, minimize, or recover from the impact of the disasters.the impact of the disasters.
    197. 197.  MitigationMitigation refers to measures taken in advance of arefers to measures taken in advance of a disaster aimed at reducing its impact on society anddisaster aimed at reducing its impact on society and environment.environment.  PreparednessPreparedness refers to measures taken to predictrefers to measures taken to predict various emergencies and prepare people to reactvarious emergencies and prepare people to react appropriately during and following such events.appropriately during and following such events.  ResponseResponse refers to measures taken immediately priorrefers to measures taken immediately prior to, and following an emergency. Such measures areto, and following an emergency. Such measures are directed towards saving life, protecting property, anddirected towards saving life, protecting property, and dealing with the immediate damage caused by the disaster.dealing with the immediate damage caused by the disaster. Commonly-Used Terms inCommonly-Used Terms in Disaster ManagementDisaster Management
    198. 198.  RehabilitationRehabilitation refers to measures taken to restorerefers to measures taken to restore affected communities/areas to their proper or normal level ofaffected communities/areas to their proper or normal level of functioning or actual condition prior to the occurrence of thefunctioning or actual condition prior to the occurrence of the disaster or calamity.disaster or calamity.  Disaster RiskDisaster Risk is the probability or harmfulis the probability or harmful consequences or expected losses in terms of death, injuries,consequences or expected losses in terms of death, injuries, property, livelihoods, economic activity or damage to theproperty, livelihoods, economic activity or damage to the environment, resulting from interactions between natural orenvironment, resulting from interactions between natural or human-induced hazards and vulnerable conditions.human-induced hazards and vulnerable conditions.  HazardHazard means a potentially damaging physical event,means a potentially damaging physical event, phenomenon and/or human activity, which may cause thephenomenon and/or human activity, which may cause the loss of life or injury, property damage, social and economicloss of life or injury, property damage, social and economic disruption or environmental degradation.disruption or environmental degradation. Commonly-Used Terms inCommonly-Used Terms in Disaster ManagementDisaster Management
    199. 199.  CapabilityCapability refers to the qualitative assessment of humanrefers to the qualitative assessment of human and material resources. E.g. ability, competence, authority.and material resources. E.g. ability, competence, authority.  CapacityCapacity refers to the quantitative assessment ofrefers to the quantitative assessment of human and material resources. e.g. number, volume, size.human and material resources. e.g. number, volume, size.  VulnerabilityVulnerability is a set of conditions resulting fromis a set of conditions resulting from physical, social, economic and environmental factors whichphysical, social, economic and environmental factors which increase susceptibility to losses from the impact of hazards.increase susceptibility to losses from the impact of hazards. Commonly-Used Terms inCommonly-Used Terms in Disaster ManagementDisaster Management
    200. 200.  ResilienceResilience means the ability to withstand the damagemeans the ability to withstand the damage caused by disasters, which includes all the factors that allowcaused by disasters, which includes all the factors that allow a community to respond to and recover from emergencies.a community to respond to and recover from emergencies.  Disaster Risk ManagementDisaster Risk Management is the process ofis the process of identifying, analyzing and quantifying probability of lossesidentifying, analyzing and quantifying probability of losses from disasters in order to undertake preventive or correctivefrom disasters in order to undertake preventive or corrective actions.actions. Commonly-Used Terms inCommonly-Used Terms in Disaster ManagementDisaster Management
    201. 201. plans, early warning,plans, early warning, SOPs, training &SOPs, training & exercises, organizationexercises, organization disaster /disaster / emergencyemergency situationsituation stabilizedstabilized no longer direct threat tono longer direct threat to life/safety and propertylife/safety and property ““healing”, repair,healing”, repair, reconstruction &reconstruction & recoveryrecovery mostlymostly back toback to normalnormal hazard/risk ID &hazard/risk ID & analysisanalysis -hazard data-hazard data collection/mapping;collection/mapping; vulnerabilityvulnerability assessmentassessment reduce risk &reduce risk & vulnerability;vulnerability; establishestablish protectiveprotective mechanismsmechanisms Mitigation Preparedness Rehabilitation Response pre eventpre event post eventpost event
    202. 202.  Enabling policies, plans, programs and strategies for DP  DP Plans/Contingency Plans  Hazards Assessment  Regular Drills and Simulation Exercises  Training and Education  Early Warning System  Information Management System  Networking/Linkages  Organization - Operating Facility- Operating Facility - Meeting Regularly- Meeting Regularly - Basic Tools & Equipment for DP- Basic Tools & Equipment for DP - Emergency Teams (Response Blocks)- Emergency Teams (Response Blocks) Standards for Disaster PreparednessStandards for Disaster Preparedness
    203. 203.  How to control crisis in times of emergency?  Disasters happen when least expected, putting the school off-guard.  There’s a need for forward planning to prepare for the unexpected.  There’s a need for a contingency plan to facilitate mobilization of response and ensure close coordination among key departments in the school such as security, administration, public relations, etc. ARE YOU PREPARED?ARE YOU PREPARED? FOR THE UNEXPECTED OR THEFOR THE UNEXPECTED OR THE UNTHINKABLEUNTHINKABLE
    204. 204. Contingency Planning A Brief Introduction
    205. 205. Answering the 3 WsAnswering the 3 Ws • Why Conduct Contingency PlanningWhy Conduct Contingency Planning • What is Contingency Planning?What is Contingency Planning? • When to do Contingency PlanningWhen to do Contingency Planning
    206. 206. ?
    207. 207. Why Contingency Planning?Why Contingency Planning? • RP is constantly beset by natural disastersRP is constantly beset by natural disasters due to its geographical locationdue to its geographical location • Man-made and Technological Disasters -Man-made and Technological Disasters - fires, civil unrest, armed conflict, epidemics,fires, civil unrest, armed conflict, epidemics, oil spills and emerging threats of terrorism –oil spills and emerging threats of terrorism – are also recurrentare also recurrent
    208. 208. Why Contingency Planning?Why Contingency Planning? • These disasters are major sources of riskThese disasters are major sources of risk especially for the poor, elderly. women andespecially for the poor, elderly. women and even children because they have the leasteven children because they have the least capability to deal with disasterscapability to deal with disasters • They cause loss of development gains andThey cause loss of development gains and wealth in developing countries like thewealth in developing countries like the PhilippinesPhilippines • Most often, disasters occur when leastMost often, disasters occur when least expected.expected.
    209. 209. Why Contingency Planning?Why Contingency Planning?  We cannot avoid them, but weWe cannot avoid them, but we can mitigate their effects throughcan mitigate their effects through timely, effective and responsivetimely, effective and responsive PLANNING.PLANNING.
    210. 210. Q.Q. Why do Contingency Planning?Why do Contingency Planning? A. To save time by:A. To save time by:  Identifying scenarios in advanceIdentifying scenarios in advance  Determining key policies in advanceDetermining key policies in advance  Defining objectives in advanceDefining objectives in advance  Identifying activities in advanceIdentifying activities in advance  Assign likely responsibilities in advance…Assign likely responsibilities in advance…  Preparing a plan in advance –Preparing a plan in advance – to save livesto save lives
    211. 211.  Mobilizing effective actions and resources forMobilizing effective actions and resources for emergency response;emergency response;  Generating commitment among partiesGenerating commitment among parties involved to act in a coordinated manner beforeinvolved to act in a coordinated manner before the emergency occurs, andthe emergency occurs, and  Providing for mechanism for decision-makingProviding for mechanism for decision-making Q.Q.Why do Contingency Planning?Why do Contingency Planning? B. To assist in:B. To assist in:
    212. 212. Typical IssuesTypical Issues Related toRelated to EmergenciesEmergencies Typical IssuesTypical Issues Related toRelated to EmergenciesEmergencies
    213. 213. RESPONSERESPONSE RESPONSERESPONSERESPONSE RESPONSERESPONSE RESPONSE RESPONSERESPONSE RESPONSE RESPONSE RESPONSE RESPONSE Crisis Crisis response response response response GENERAL INDIFFERENCE BACK TO “NORMAL” BRIEF PERIOD OF INTENSE INTEREST Crisis EMERGENCY Coordinating differing mandates, and resources, improves effectiveness, reduces duplication and addresses more of the underlying needs. BeforeBefore Emergency Emergency Issue 1 - Time ConstraintIssue 1 - Time Constraint
    214. 214. Emerging Needs Engineering Too many expextations Too few resources Too many actors Too many needs Too little time WHO?WHO? Issue 2 – Enormous NeedsIssue 2 – Enormous Needs Old Needs Medical Security General Services Student Affairs COCOPEA LGUs DEPEd CHED PASUC NGOs PrivatePrivate SectorSector Administration
    215. 215. Government ResponseScenario A Plan & Activities Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C Results of UncoordinatedResults of Uncoordinated PlanningPlanning Sectoral Response Scenario A Plan & Activities Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C NGOResponse Scenario A Plan & Activities Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C Donors’ Response Scenario A Plan & Activities Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C Host Gov’t Knowledge Base Scenario A Contingency Planning Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C Gov’t Knowledge Base Scenario A Contingency Planning Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C Victims Response Scenario A Contingency Planning Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C Go v’t Kn ow ledge Base Scenario A Co ntingency Planning Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C NGO Partner Knowledge Base Scenario A Contingency Planning Scenario B Scenario C Plan A Plan B Plan C Issue 3 – Difficult CoordinationIssue 3 – Difficult Coordination
    216. 216. What isWhat is Contingency PlanningContingency Planning “A forward planning process, in a state of uncertainty, in which scenarios and objectives are agreed, managerial and technical actions defined, and potential response systems put in place in order to prevent, or better respond to, an emergency or critical situation.”
    217. 217. • What isWhat is Contingency PlanningContingency Planning ““Contingency”Contingency” simply means the emergency for which the response plan is being developed may or may not take place. “Planning”“Planning” implies that the response mechanism has to be set in place before the emergency event
    218. 218. Where in the Cycle?
    219. 219. Emergency Response Post-Emergency Prevention & Mitigation Pre-emergency Emergency Assessment Emergency Response Rehabilitation Durable Solution Reconstruction ContingencyContingency PlanningPlanning Early warning Assessment Coordination Info.Management Resource Mobilisation Nat’l & Int’s Linkages Maintenance Prevention Mitigation Operational Planning Preparedness
    220. 220. When to do Contingency Planning 1. As early as right NOW 2. LATER, when we have more information ? 3. JUST BEFORE the event, to maximise information ? 4. RIGHT AFTER the exact damage is known? When to Begin Contingency Planning
    221. 221. “It is better to plan when it is not needed, than not to have planned when it was necessary”.
    222. 222. Who should be involved?Who should be involved? CONTINGENCY PLANNING
    223. 223. … should participate in Contingency Planning Many heads are better than one
    224. 224. • School AdministrationSchool Administration • Those who will actually be assumingThose who will actually be assuming emergency response tasksemergency response tasks – PolicyPolicy – ManagerialManagerial – TechnicalTechnical • Facilitating teamFacilitating team Who are to be involvedWho are to be involved in CPin CP
    225. 225. Scanning the Environment Generating ScenariosScenarios (Anatomy of emergency) Predicting Needs Employ indicators Taking stock Of Resources Arranging Response System & ActionsSystem & Actions Setting policiespolicies and sectoral objectives Identify GapsGaps Endorsement & Activation
    226. 226. Contingency CycleContingency Cycle ASSESSMENT FORMULATION ENDORSEMENT ACTIVATION
    227. 227. Chapter I – General Situation andChapter I – General Situation and ScenariosScenarios Chapter I – General Situation andChapter I – General Situation and ScenariosScenarios A. Background and RationaleA. Background and Rationale * Briefly describe the various hazards affecting the community* Briefly describe the various hazards affecting the community and their effects on lives and propertiesand their effects on lives and properties * From these hazards/threats, identify the specific disaster* From these hazards/threats, identify the specific disaster event or threat to plan forevent or threat to plan for * Identify three (3) possible scenarios (bad, worse and worst* Identify three (3) possible scenarios (bad, worse and worst cases) and plan for the “worst case” scenariocases) and plan for the “worst case” scenario * Indicate planning assumptions including timeline or window of* Indicate planning assumptions including timeline or window of occurrenceoccurrence (Refer to activity outputs in Environmental Scanning and Defining the(Refer to activity outputs in Environmental Scanning and Defining the Emergency Situation)Emergency Situation)
    228. 228. Chapter II –Chapter II – GeneralGeneral Policies and ObjectivesPolicies and Objectives * Identify national, local and agreed policies and* Identify national, local and agreed policies and general objectives of the contingency plangeneral objectives of the contingency plan * Identify national, local and agreed policies and* Identify national, local and agreed policies and general objectives of the contingency plangeneral objectives of the contingency plan Chapter III - Sectoral Plans and ArrangementsChapter III - Sectoral Plans and Arrangements A. Allocation of Responsibilities according to needsA. Allocation of Responsibilities according to needs * Command, Control and Coordination* Command, Control and Coordination * Public Information (IEC) and Media Relation* Public Information (IEC) and Media Relation ** CommunicationCommunication
    229. 229.  RegistrationRegistration  Logistics and TransportLogistics and Transport  Environment SanitationEnvironment Sanitation  Shelter and other InfrastructureShelter and other Infrastructure  SecuritySecurity  Search and Rescue (SAR)Search and Rescue (SAR)  Fire SuppressionFire Suppression  Emergency Medical ServiceEmergency Medical Service
    230. 230.  Relief ServiceRelief Service  FoodFood  WaterWater  Utilities (Chart)Utilities (Chart)  Evacuation ServiceEvacuation Service  Post –Trauma/StressPost –Trauma/Stress DebriefingDebriefing  HygieneHygiene
    231. 231.  OthersOthers B. Brief description of sector situation when theB. Brief description of sector situation when the emergency occursemergency occurs C. Sectoral ObjectivesC. Sectoral Objectives D. Sectoral Indicators as appropriateD. Sectoral Indicators as appropriate E. Existing sector resources vs. projectedE. Existing sector resources vs. projected needsneeds F. Concept of Operation (Flow Chart)F. Concept of Operation (Flow Chart)
    232. 232. Chapter IV – Procedures for feedback, upgradingChapter IV – Procedures for feedback, upgrading and future actionand future action  Describe how the Plan will be updated and revised,Describe how the Plan will be updated and revised, who will be responsible for ensuring this and howwho will be responsible for ensuring this and how the information will be disseminated.the information will be disseminated.  The P/C/M Planning Development Officer shall beThe P/C/M Planning Development Officer shall be the OPR for updating, revising and consolidatingthe OPR for updating, revising and consolidating contingency placontingency plan who shall ensure that alln who shall ensure that all informations relative to said plan shall be properlyinformations relative to said plan shall be properly disseminated to all concerns.disseminated to all concerns.
    233. 233. ““The survival of mankind willThe survival of mankind will depend upon people who thinkdepend upon people who think differently to act together”differently to act together” HofstedeHofstede Cross-Cultural TheoristCross-Cultural Theorist
    234. 234. SECURITY TEAM TYPICAL ORGANIZATION OFTYPICAL ORGANIZATION OF DISASTER CONTROL GROUPDISASTER CONTROL GROUP CHAIRMAN ASST. CHAIRMAN STAFF ELEMENTS DCG OPERATIONS CENTER SUPPLY TEAM TRANSPORTATION TEAM COMMUNICATION TEAM OPERATIONS TEAM WARNING TEAM EVACUATION TEAM FIRE BRIGADE TEAM RESCUE TEAM MEDICAL TEAM DAMAGE CONTROL TEAM
    235. 235. SECURITY TEAM DISASTER CONTROL GROUPDISASTER CONTROL GROUP ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTORGANIZATIONAL CHART CHAIRMAN ASST. CHAIRMAN DISASTER CONTROL GROUP OPERATIONS CENTER STAFF & SERVICE TEAMS EVACUATION TEAM LEADER WING LEADER FLOOR LEADER AREA LEADER SUPPLY TEAM TRANSPORTATION TEAM COMMUNICATIONS TEAM WARNING TEAM MEDICAL TEAM ENGINEERING/ RESCUE TEAM FIRE BRIGADE TEAM DAMAGE CONTROL TEAM ELEVATOR MONITOR STAIRWAY MONITOR ROOM MONITOR
    236. 236. DISASTER CONTROL GROUPDISASTER CONTROL GROUP CORE DUTIESCORE DUTIES  ChairmanChairman is responsible for developing the plan tois responsible for developing the plan to protect life and property and to minimize damage in theprotect life and property and to minimize damage in the event of a civil defense emergency or other disaster.event of a civil defense emergency or other disaster.  Assistant ChairmanAssistant Chairman serves as the Principal Assistant toserves as the Principal Assistant to DCG Chairman and acts for him in his absence and performsDCG Chairman and acts for him in his absence and performs such duties the Chairman may assign to him, in addition tosuch duties the Chairman may assign to him, in addition to being the Deputy.being the Deputy. STAFF ELEMENTS:STAFF ELEMENTS:  Security Team LeaderSecurity Team Leader shall be responsible for securingshall be responsible for securing vacated buildings, hospitals, establishments, factories, schools,vacated buildings, hospitals, establishments, factories, schools, etc., or areas of evacuation centers and areas of operations.etc., or areas of evacuation centers and areas of operations.
    237. 237. DISASTER CONTROL GROUPDISASTER CONTROL GROUP CORE DUTIESCORE DUTIES  Supply Team LeaderSupply Team Leader shall be responsible forshall be responsible for determining the supply requirements of all action teams. Hedetermining the supply requirements of all action teams. He shall Identify the sources of such supplies as may be needed.shall Identify the sources of such supplies as may be needed.  Transportation Team LeaderTransportation Team Leader shall be responsible for theshall be responsible for the transport needs. He shall determine the transportation needstransport needs. He shall determine the transportation needs and requirements.and requirements.  Communication Team LeaderCommunication Team Leader shall be responsible forshall be responsible for Receipt of warning information from the local CivilReceipt of warning information from the local Civil Defense Director or other authoritative sources andDefense Director or other authoritative sources and disseminates such warning to all offices and personnel.disseminates such warning to all offices and personnel.
    238. 238. OPERATIONS TEAMS:OPERATIONS TEAMS:  Warning Team LeaderWarning Team Leader should insure that warningshould insure that warning signals can be received by all occupants and offices. Hesignals can be received by all occupants and offices. He insures that all occupants should be educated on theinsures that all occupants should be educated on the meaning of different warning signals or alarms andmeaning of different warning signals or alarms and necessary actions to be taken.necessary actions to be taken.  Evacuation Team LeaderEvacuation Team Leader is responsible for supervisingis responsible for supervising and expediting the planned and controlled movement of alland expediting the planned and controlled movement of all building occupants in an emergency.building occupants in an emergency.  Fire Brigade Team LeaderFire Brigade Team Leader organizes the fir-fightingorganizes the fir-fighting teams or brigades for initial fire-fighting operations.teams or brigades for initial fire-fighting operations. DISASTER CONTROL GROUPDISASTER CONTROL GROUP CORE DUTIESCORE DUTIES
    239. 239. DISASTER CONTROL GROUPDISASTER CONTROL GROUP CORE DUTIESCORE DUTIES  Rescue Team LeaderRescue Team Leader is responsible for locating injured oris responsible for locating injured or trapped persons and transferring them to a place wheretrapped persons and transferring them to a place where they can be taken cared of during an emergency.they can be taken cared of during an emergency.  Medical Team LeaderMedical Team Leader as head of the Health and First-as head of the Health and First- Aid Team, is responsible for training and equipping allAid Team, is responsible for training and equipping all personnel assigned to perform medical and first-aid servicespersonnel assigned to perform medical and first-aid services in emergency, and for supervising these operations within thein emergency, and for supervising these operations within the building during emergency.building during emergency.  Damage & Control Team LeaderDamage & Control Team Leader is responsible foris responsible for controlling utilities in the facility or building duringcontrolling utilities in the facility or building during emergency.emergency.
    240. 240. DCC-DCG NETWORKING & LINKAGESDCC-DCG NETWORKING & LINKAGES NATIONAL DISASTER COORDINATING COUNCILS REGIONAL DCC EFFECTIVE RESPONSE BLOCKEFFECTIVE RESPONSE BLOCK OFFICE OF CIVIL DEFENSE-NATIONAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT CENTER (OCD-NDMC) DISASTER CONTROL GROUP DANA EMSSAR RELIEF & EVACUATION FIRE SUPPRESSION MFR Teams PICE ASEP 51ST EBD PNRC BFP-EMS DOH CSSR Teams 51st EBDE BFP DSWD DOH PNRC AFP RESCOM PGH AUXILIARY RESPONSE GROUPS P/M/C/BDCC Command/Control/Coordination
    241. 241. Arday Bocil Cagara R= H x V (c)R= H x V (c) 1. What is the hazard? 2. What vulnerabilities? 3. What elements are at-risk? 4. What constitute capacities? 5. Which one is the most at-risk?
    242. 242. Contingency PlanningContingency Planning :: The Process and CP FormatThe Process and CP Format WORKSHOPWORKSHOP I. Environmental ScanningI. Environmental Scanning A. Hazard & Risk Identification – Activity 1A. Hazard & Risk Identification – Activity 1 Instructions:Instructions: 1. Divide the participants into four (4) groups.1. Divide the participants into four (4) groups. 2. List out the most important specific hazards in the school,2. List out the most important specific hazards in the school, limit to 10.limit to 10. 3. Assess the school vulnerabilities and capacities with regard3. Assess the school vulnerabilities and capacities with regard to these hazards and rate them according to:to these hazards and rate them according to: a) chance to occura) chance to occur b) severity of impactb) severity of impact
    243. 243. Risk Assessment TableRisk Assessment Table Rank Hazard P I Average Recommended Actions to Decrease Damages from Future Disasters Duration: 10 minutesDuration: 10 minutes FORM 1 Contingency PlanningContingency Planning :: The Process and CP FormatThe Process and CP Format WORKSHOPWORKSHOP 4. Use the form below:4. Use the form below:
    244. 244. Contingency PlanningContingency Planning :: The Process and CP FormatThe Process and CP Format WORKSHOPWORKSHOP RISK RATINGRISK RATING ProbabilityProbability ImpactImpact 1.1. Most unlikelyMost unlikely 1. Negligible1. Negligible 2.2. Low ProbabilityLow Probability 2. Low Impact2. Low Impact 3.3. PerhapsPerhaps 3. Maintain Impact3. Maintain Impact 4.4. High ProbabilityHigh Probability 4. High Impact4. High Impact 5.5. Almost CertainAlmost Certain 5. Devastating5. Devastating
    245. 245. Contingency Planning :Contingency Planning : The Process and CP FormatThe Process and CP Format WORKSHOPWORKSHOP B. Defining the Event to plan for/Hazard Analysis – Activity 2B. Defining the Event to plan for/Hazard Analysis – Activity 2 Instruction:Instruction: 1. Group the participants per province/city/region1. Group the participants per province/city/region 2. Based on Activity 2 output, ask per group to identify the2. Based on Activity 2 output, ask per group to identify the event to plan for.event to plan for. 3. Draw the location map and identify critical facilities at risk.3. Draw the location map and identify critical facilities at risk. 4. Ask them to conduct an anatomy of this event by identifying4. Ask them to conduct an anatomy of this event by identifying the root causes, early warning indicators and triggeringthe root causes, early warning indicators and triggering
    246. 246. 4. Use the form below:4. Use the form below: Duration : 10 minutesDuration : 10 minutes Event to plan for:_______________________________________Event to plan for:_______________________________________ Root Causes Early Warning Triggering Factor Impact/ Elements at Risk FORM 2
    247. 247. NEEDS AND ACTIVITIESNEEDS AND ACTIVITIES IDENTIFICATIONIDENTIFICATION Purpose of this Activity:Purpose of this Activity: To determine the variousTo determine the various Sectors likely to be involved should the eventSectors likely to be involved should the event identified to plan for occur. These identified Sectorsidentified to plan for occur. These identified Sectors will develop their respective Sectoral plans to formwill develop their respective Sectoral plans to form part of the Contingency Plan.part of the Contingency Plan. Examples:Examples: Food sector, Search & Rescue,Food sector, Search & Rescue, Evacuation, Security, Public Information, Water &Evacuation, Security, Public Information, Water & SanitationSanitation
    248. 248. TelefaxTelefax - (+632)911-1406- (+632)911-1406 TelephoneTelephone - (+632)912-2665- (+632)912-2665 (+632)912-5668(+632)912-5668 (+632)911-5061-64(+632)911-5061-64 local 108local 108 SMS Number: 0917-8916322SMS Number: 0917-8916322
    249. 249. Email – dopcen@ndcc.gov.phEmail – dopcen@ndcc.gov.ph dopcen@ocd.gov.phdopcen@ocd.gov.ph Website – www.ndcc.gov.phWebsite – www.ndcc.gov.ph www.ocd.gov.phwww.ocd.gov.ph

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