VDCL Recent Results
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

VDCL Recent Results

  • 1,779 views
Uploaded on

Show recent, preliminary results into project leadership practices that contribute to success of I.T.-intensive business projects.

Show recent, preliminary results into project leadership practices that contribute to success of I.T.-intensive business projects.

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,779
On Slideshare
1,771
From Embeds
8
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 8

http://www.slideshare.net 3
https://www.linkedin.com 3
http://www.linkedin.com 2

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Gezinus J. Hidding, Ph.D. Loyola University Chicago ghiddin@luc.edu, 312.915.7059 Joint research with John Nicholas, Ph.D. jnichol@luc.edu, 312.915.7060
  • 2. Objective
    • By the End of this Session:
    • You Will Understand How
    • Business Analysts
    • Can Contribute to Success
    • Of I.T.- Intensive Business Projects
    • This is YOUR Session:
      • Feel Free to Interrupt Whenever
  • 3. Overview
    • There Are (Still) Many (I.T.) Project Failures
    • Needed: A New Paradigm
    • for (I.T.) Project Management (P.M.)
      • Value-Driven Change Leadership (VDCL)
    • Our Empirical Research (Ongoing)
      • Find Project Management Practices
      • Associated with Project Success or Failure
    • Research Results To Date
      • PMBOK/VDCL Success Factors
      • Observations That Are Striking (to Us)
  • 4. I.T. Project Failures: There Are (Still) Many
    • Standish Group - Chaos 2006
      • 19% of Projects Canceled before Completed
      • 46% of Projects Over Budget, Late and/or Less Features
      • 35% of Projects On Time, On Budget, as Specified
    • Department of Defense Software Projects
      • 29% - Paid for, but not delivered
      • 46% - Delivered, but not successfully used
      • 20% - Used, but extensively reworked or abandoned
      • 3% - Used after changes
      • 2% - Used as delivered
    • Diamond Consultants’ Digital IQ study
      • 43% of IT executives:
      • 90% of projects meet initial expectations
    See also: “Common Sense in Project Management” Paul Tedesco, Thomson Publishing, 2006.
  • 5. Common Failure Factors
    • Bad Project Planning
      • Poor Specification of End-Item
      • Wrong Estimate of Cost/Resources
    • Bad Project Management
      • Bad Scope Management
      • Ineffective Change Control
      • Poor Issues Management
    • Bad Monitoring & Control
      • Projects up to 20 times more likely to escalate in terms of time and costs
      • (Mark Keil – Georgia State University)
  • 6. Cause: Wrong Success Measures
    • If a Project Was:
    • “ Ahead of Schedule” and “Below Budget,”
      • Was It Successful?
    • “ Behind Schedule” and “Over Budget,”
      • Was It a Failure?
    • “ Ahead of Schedule” but “Over Budget,”
      • What Is It?
    • “ Behind Schedule” but “Under Budget,”
      • What Is It?
  • 7. Root Cause: Traditional P.M. Paradigm
    • The Traditional P.M. Paradigm Focuses On
    • Activities Being “On Schedule” and “Within Budget,”
    • Not on Value Added by the Delivered Products.
    • Planned Added
    • Value Value
    • Planned Delivered
    • Products Products
    • Activities
    “ Goal-Directed Project Management: Effective Techniques and Strategies”, Erling Andersen, Kristoffer Grude , Tor Haug, Kogan Page, 1995.
  • 8. Needed: New Paradigm Value-Driven Change Leadership (VDCL)
    • 3 Key Aspects:
    • Change
    • Leadership
      • based on
    • Solution
    • Architecture
      • towards
    • Business
    • Value
  • 9. Differences
    • Traditional P.M.
    • Manage Administer
    • Activities
    • through
    • Phases
    • towards
    • On-Time/ Budget
    • based on
    • PERT Chart
    • VDCL
    • Lead
    • People
    • through
    • Releases
    • towards
    • Value (End results)
    • based on
    • Solution Architecture
  • 10. Who Is Involved in VDCL?
    • 20 Seasoned I.T. Project Managers
    • With Average Experience of 20 years:
    • University faculty: with Practical Experience
    • Consultants: I.T. and Business
    • Project Managers: at Real Companies
    • I.T. Architects: of Large Systems
    • Vendors: of Software Tools
    • Authors: Books about Project Management
  • 11. Our View: Projects Implement Strategy Through Change
    • Strategy
    • Project
    • Change
  • 12. Let’s Go Out There And Shift Some Paradigm!
    • From: Pepper … and Salt, The Wall Street Journal
  • 13. VDCL: Fundamental Principles
    • “ There Are No I.T. Projects.
    • There Are Only Business Projects.
    • Some Have More I.T. than Others.”
    • Value-driven
      • Value-added over Budget/Schedule
    • Change Leadership
      • Human Change over Repeated Activities
    • Based on Architecture
      • Business Solution over Architecture Framework
  • 14. Value - driven
    • “ Firms Invest in I.T. to Create Value, Not Software.”
    • Value-added over
    • Budget/Schedule
    • Measuring Business Results over
    • Measuring Project Conformance
    • Managing the Business Case over
    • Abandoning the Business Case
    • Quantifying the Financial Impact of Risks over Identifying a List of Risks
  • 15. B.A. “How To”: Manage Change Requests to Value
    • Budget Schedule and Value
    • Change 1 . . .
    • Change 2 . . .
    • Change 3 . . .
    • Change 4 . . .
  • 16. Change Leadership
    • “ It’s the People, Stupid”
    • Human Change over
    • Repeated Activities
    • Changing Organizations over
    • Delivering Products
    • Improving Activities over
    • Repeating Activities
    • Developing Human Relations over
    • Interchanging Resources
  • 17. “ The ‘Soft Stuff’ Is the ‘Hard Stuff’”
    • Leadership
      • Executive Support
      • Change Management
      • Assign Well-Suited Personnel
    • Communication
      • With Customer
      • With User
      • Within Management Hierarchy
      • Within Project Team
    • Team Cohesion
      • Commitment to Project/Goal and Team
      • Intercultural Issues
      • Conflict Management
  • 18. B.A. “How To”: Time to Learn from Others
    • Learn from Customers:
    • How Can We Serve You Better?
    • Learn from Team Members:
    • How Can We Work Smarter?
    • Learn from Other Current Projects:
    • What Should We (Not) Do?
    • Learn from Previous Projects:
    • If You Had To Do It Over,
    • What Would You (Not) Do?
  • 19. Based on Architecture
    • “ Skyscrapers Are not Built Wall by Wall,
    • but Floor by Floor, around the Core.”
    • Business Solution over
    • Architecture Framework
    • Designing Business Solutions over
    • Debating Generic Frameworks
    • Releasing Frequently over
    • Releasing with One Big Bang
    • Flexible Architecture Alternatives over
    • One Architecture Design
  • 20. Definition: Architecture Is Representation of Structure
    • Architecture of Application/ Solution
      • Representation Describing Structure of a Specific System:
        • Configuration of Common Modules
        • Relations between Modules (I/O, Control)
        • Specific Syntax of Modules’ Interfaces
    • Specific Business Drivers Lead to a Specific Architecture
    • 20% of the Code Drives 80% of the Requirements (20/80 rule)
  • 21. Definition: Architecture Is Not Infrastructure
    • Infrastructure Is a Supersystem Offering Common Functionalities to Be Used by the Application/ Solution
    • Structure Is Common Functionalities in the Application/ Solution
    • Infrastructure and Application/ Solution Both (Can) Have an Architecture
    • VDCL Is Agnostic about Development Method
      • Calls for Explicit Attention to Architecture
      • Does Not Require a Particular Method
  • 22. B.A. “How To”: Prioritize What Is (Not) Essential?
    • Which Objectives Are Essential?
    • Which Functionalities Are Essential?
    • Which Modules Are Essential?
    • What Can Be Delivered Sooner/Later?
  • 23. VDCL Paradigm: Summary
    • Decide How Much Value To Deliver When
    • Decide Which Deliverables Make Up Each Release
    • Plan Each Release As Usual (Schedule, Budget, …)
    • Manage Based On Results Achieved
    • Value Value Value Value ...
    • Architecture
    • Release Release Release ...
    • Activities Activities ...
    • Time
  • 24. Empirical Research: Does VDCL Make a Difference?
    • VDCL:
      • Business Value
      • Change Leadership
      • Solution Architecture
    • Project
    • PMBOK
      • 9 Knowledge Areas
    • Success
    • Project Demographics
      • Project
      • Project Manager
      • Organization
  • 25. Research Design
    • Study Medium-Sized I.T. Projects
    • In Large(r) Chicago-based Organizations
      • Sofar: Sixteen Projects in Seven Organizations
        • Not enough yet for solid statistic analysis (e.g., PLS)
    • Per Company, Compare Projects Pair(s):
      • Successful – Unsuccessful
    • Structured Interviews
      • Standard Questionnaire
        • Secured IRB Approval
      • Interview Project Manager
  • 26. Interview Questionnaire
    • Organization Background
    • Project Background
    • Project Manager Background
    • Measures of Success/ Failure
    • PM Practices
      • PMBOK
      • VDCL
  • 27. Sample Statements (on a 7-Point Scale Strongly Disagree – Strongly Agree)
    • From the Perspective of the Organization’s Value Added (Taking into Account All Benefits and All Costs),
    • This Project Was a Success
    • From Beginning to End, The Business Case Was Kept Up-To-Date and the Project Stayed Focused on Achieving It.
    • The Project Plan Adequately Reflected
    • the End-Product’s Architecture.
    • From Beginning to End, The Project Focused on People Having to Change.
  • 28. Non-parametric Analysis
    • Project Pair 1 2 3 … n Correlation
    • PM Practice 1 + + + + Positive
    • PM Practice 2 + 0 0 - None
    • PM Practice n - - - - Negative
    • +/- When Practice Was Used More/Less
    • in Successful Project in Pair i
    • than in Less-Successful Project
  • 29. Preliminary Results to Date: Correlation with Success
    • PMBOK:
      • (T1) Time Management
      • (S1) Scope Management
      • (Com1) Expectations Management
    • VDCL:
      • (V2) Keep Business Case Updated Throughout
      • (V3) All Stakeholders Agree on Project Purpose
      • (A) Project Plan Reflected Solution Architecture
  • 30. Keep Business Case Updated Throughout the Project
    • Before Project Starts
      • Clarify project purpose and success metrics
      • Evaluate alternatives
    • During Project Implementation
      • Evaluate change requests
      • Make trade-off decisions
    • After Project Ends
      • Analyze business value / project outcome
  • 31. All Stakeholders Agree on Project Purpose
    • Reach Agreement and Understanding among Key Stakeholders
    • and All Project Participants
    • on the Project’s Value / Outcomes
    • and Clear Success Metrics
    • Give Project Participants a Personal Stake in the Project’s Success or Failure
  • 32. Striking Observations
    • Almost ALL Projects Overran
    • Schedule and Budget
      • “ Successful” and “Unsuccessful” Projects Alike
      • But, Successful Projects Had Smaller Overruns
    • Almost ALL Projects Do NOT Track:
    • - Employee Labor Hours
    • - Benefits
        • Neither During Development Nor After Delivery
    • Some “Failed” Projects Did Not Deliver due to Dependency on Larger Program
  • 33. Discussion
    • Questions?
    • Reactions?
    • Feedback?
    • Agreement?
    • Disagreement?
  • 34. Preliminary Results to Date: No Correlation with Success
    • PMBOK:
      • (HR1) Human Resource Management
    • VDCL:
      • Negatively Correlated?
        • (V5) Quantify Financial Impact of Combined Risks
        • (A3) Deliver in Multiple Releases
          • Inadvertent Sample Bias?
        • (P7) Project’s Riskiness (as Perceived at the Start)