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Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
Fables and morals
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Fables and morals

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Grades 4-6

Grades 4-6

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  • 1. Fables and Morals
  • 2. What are fables? Are they the same as fairytales? What’s their purpose? Are they found in every culture?
  • 3. Some things you should y know about Fables… Early form of story telling Believed to be originated in India Aesop – Most famous fable teller – a Greek Slave who lived about 620 B.C.
  • 4. AESOP Credited for most of the known fables heard today. His fables include “The Ant and the Grasshopper,” and “The Lion and the Wolf.”
  • 5. What are some characteristics of fables? Short stories Features animals, plants & forces of nature with human qualities Handed down generation after generation
  • 6. Fables teach a lesson that everyone can understand. They connect us with other cultures.
  • 7. Which of these are characteristics of fables? A) Human Gods B) Animals with human characteristics C) Happy endings D) All of the above
  • 8. So what are fairy tales? Start with “Once upon a time” Setting in a castle, forest or town Story has good/evil characters
  • 9. Fairy Tales cont. Have many characters are animals or royalty Have magic Have the numbers 3 or 7 in it
  • 10. A Fairy Tale also…. Has a story with a problem The problem in story is solved Good wins over evil
  • 11. Which one is not a characteristic of a fairytale? A) Has the numbers 3 and 7 B) Once upon a time C) Good wins over Evil D) Teaches a lesson
  • 12. How are fables and fairy tales the same? Handed down from generation to generation Fictional stories – not true
  • 13. Similarities: Fables &Fairy Tales • Connect us with different cultures • For all ages
  • 14. Differences Fables Characters: Animals that act like humans Fairy Tales Characters: Royalty Teaches a lesson Good vs. Evil
  • 15. Fables of Different cultures Involve animals found in that culture Reflects cultural beliefs
  • 16. Fable: The Tortoise and the Hare • The hare laughed at the tortoise’s short feet and slow pace. • The tortoise challenged him to a race • The hare agreed
  • 17. Tortoise and the Hare • The tortoise never stopped, he went slow and steady the whole way • The hare thought he had time and took a nap • He finally woke up, and rushed to the finish line
  • 18. Tortoise and the Hare MORAL: Don’t rush into things
  • 19. Fables can have more than one lesson. Another lesson for the tortoise and the Hare is “Slow and Steady wins the race”
  • 20. Animals Used in Fables Lion – Strength, Big Ego Donkey- stupid Fox – Sly • Hawk: tyrannical
  • 21. Animals Used in Fables Wolf – Greed, Dishonest Fly- wise Hen- conceited Lamb – Shyness
  • 22. Using Fables and their Morals
  • 23. The Frog and the Ox A young frog, amazed at the huge size of an ox, rushed to tell her father about the monster. The father frog, trying to impress his child, puffed himself up to look like the ox. The young frog said it was much bigger. Again the father puffed himself up. The young frog insisted the monster was even bigger. The father puffed and puffed - and burst!
  • 24. Match the Moral to the Fable Persuasion is better than force. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Small friends can be powerful allies. Liars may give themselves away. Make hay while the sun . shines. Don’t just follow the crowd. Sometimes we do not see our own strengths. Pride can be costly.
  • 25. The Monkey and the Dolphin A monkey fell from a ship and was rescued by a dolphin. The dolphin asked if he lived nearby. The monkey lied and said that he did. “Do you know Seriphos?” asked the dolphin. The monkey, thinking Seriphos was a person’s name, boasted that it was his best friend. As Seriphos was a town, the dolphin knew the monkey was lying, so he dived, leaving him to swim to shore.
  • 26. Persuasion is better than force. Match the Moral to the Fable Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Don’t just follow the crowd. Small friends can be powerful allies. Liars may give themselves away. Make hay while the sun . shines. Sometimes we do not see our own strengths. Pride can be costly.
  • 27. The Fox and the Old Lion An old lion sent out word that he was ill and said that he would like the animals and birds to visit him. Most went but fox did not. Finally the lion sent for him, asking why he had not come to see him. The clever fox replied, “I had planned to, but I noticed that although many tracks led into your cave, none led out.”
  • 28. Persuasion is better than force. Match the Moral to the Fable Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Don’t just follow the crowd. Small friends can be powerful allies. Liars may give themselves away. Make hay while the sun . shines. Sometimes we do not see our own strengths. Pride can be costly.
  • 29. The End… but not the end of fables…. Click here for more examples. *The Boy Who Cried “Wolf” *The Fox and the Grapes *The Tortoise and the Hare

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