Sixth International Conference onComputers and the Humanities
Sixth International Conference onComputers and the HumanitiesSarah K. Burton and Douglas D. Short, EditorsNorth Carolina S...
The Electronic Newsletter                                George Brett                            East Carolfna University ...
o. Brett   28expanse where messages are posted.             But what does all this have toPublic messages are pinned open-...
30    The Electronic Newsletter     dated and does insure that the     contributor will have a substantial     wait to rec...
O.,ri&lrt © 1983 Computer Science Press, Inc. "~d      in the United States of America             reserved. No part of th...
CONTENTSPreface . ... .. . ... . .. . . .. .. .... . . ... .. .. . .. . .. ... .. . .... . .. ... . ... .. ... .. . .........
Word Processors: Methodological and Moral Reflections  Frank Elliston and John Snapper . ....................................
Discontinuous Morphology: Categories and Subcategories in Lexical Processing  Arthur E. Kunst . .............................
Linear Expansion and Redundancy in Natural Language and Art   D.L. Rankin and J.F. Crook .. .. ...... . .............. . ....
Beyond Word Crunching  Kathleen Turner and Matthew Marino ...................................................................
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Transcript of "Sixth conf-ach-1983-ghbrett"

  1. 1. Sixth International Conference onComputers and the Humanities
  2. 2. Sixth International Conference onComputers and the HumanitiesSarah K. Burton and Douglas D. Short, EditorsNorth Carolina State University COMPUTER SCIENCE PRESS
  3. 3. The Electronic Newsletter George Brett East Carolfna University Newsletters traditionally have This kind of imagination canbeen a channel for exchange of lead to large phone bills. In factinformation among professionals in it does. This is not fiction buta particular field of interest. fact for many professionals rightNewsletters come in most every now. These people own or haveformat from simple broadsheets to access to mitrocomputers andglossy magazines. All have a few terminals. They are subscribers tocommon traits such as space one of the large Data Bases such aslimitations, time dealines, and the "Source" or "Compuserve." Thesepostal fees. people also use another form of Data Base known as the Electronic Imagine if you will being able Bulletin Board, such as the Northto make a phone call to read a Carolina Educational Computingnewsletter. But also with this one Services Message and Mail service.call being able to send your articleto the edi tor, a 1 etter to a The large Data Base providescolleague in another state, or a service on a subscription basis.want-ad for the teaching position The fee is based on the length ofthat just opened in your department. time that the subscriber is inPerhaps you would check on the contact, "on 1 ine", with the Datalatest in a series of ongoing Base. While "on line" thedebates in the Public Forum section. subscriber can browse throughWhile you are browsing through the information from a number ofinformation, you are interrupted by national newspapers including thea flashing message that someone is "New York Times" and the "Washingtontryi ng to contact you. The message Post." Other services include theis from the recipient of your stock market r.eports; reviews ofletter. She happened to be "online" movies, theater, and recordings;at the same time as you are, has tutorials for computer programming;read your letter, and has responded financial Management; wordto it. All this with one phone processing; and public bulletincall. You have read your boa rd s.newsletter, sent an article, sent aletter to another subscriber, posted Similar to the bulletin boarda want-ad, taken part in an o~going in an office or at a localdebate, and have received a message laundromat, the Electronic Bulletinfrom a colleague in another state. Board would be visualized as a large 28
  4. 4. o. Brett 28expanse where messages are posted. But what does all this have toPublic messages are pinned open- do with newsletters you ask. Somefaced to the board. Private bulletin board systems now have amessages are folded with only the "system operator," usually a personrecipients name visible. The who owns the computer or works forElectronic Bulletin Board is usually the owner. Thi s "sysop" isa sequential list of articles and responsible for making sure all themessages on the computer system on hardware and software of the systemwhich the bulletin board is run. is operati ng, and, in effect he orAnyone who has access to the she is the editor of the bulletingbulletin board can read the open board. When messages and articlesmessages. Sometimes passwords are are out of date, become toogiven to limit the people who can inflammatory, or arewrite articles or messages. Most incomprehensible, this personed1tstimes however, bulletin boards are them from the system. One systemopen. thinks of the sysop as a gardener who "prunes" the bad branche i from Public messages are posted on the bulletin board. In fac~thisthe Electronic Bulletin Board as system is known {is the "Comm~niTree"news items" or "articles." Private Conferencing System."messages are· thought of as "mail"that is sent to each users mail Electronic Bulletin Boards havebox. The computer hardware and editors. But, are they newsletters?software programs for the bulletin In many respects, yes, they are.board are known as the "system." The negative response is that forThe person in charge of the "system" the moment Electronic Bulletinis the "system operator." The Boards are the playthings of thesubscriber who accesses the bulletin growing minority of microc6mputerboard is the "user." users. Even though it will take time for the masses in academia to Until recently bulletin boards realize the certain potential ofhave been used primarily for and by Electronic Bulletin Board ascomputer buffs. Using secret professional newsletters, is boundpasswords and codes for entry to a replace newsletters forprivate club, computer hackers, professionals for at least two goodbuffs, sit at their terminals an go reasons: money and time."on line." This is beginning tochange. Now some larger Money. Everyone pays for acorporations, especially in printed newsletter. Subscribers payfinancial fields, have been using a fee imbedded in their professionalElectronic Bulletin Boards as a dues; contributors pay formethod for keeping in touch with duplication and postage ofemployees out in the field. Now a manuscripts to and from the editor.sal e sma n can calli nat any tim e The newsletter itself pays an ever-during the day or night to update increasing amount for printing.his, her, or company files on a Then the circulation staff pays tocertain client or job. Memos can be have mailing labels printed or typedsent to the bulletin board to be and, finally, pays for mail ing ther ead by people in the same building nevsletters to the subscriber~.a nd across the nation. Time. Considering the time for The key to accessing a bulletin collecting information, editing,board is to have a little system typesetting, printing, and posting,th at can tie into the big system . the time lag for an article fromCu rrently, a personal system can submission to the time it is read isco st from four hundred to four often six months or more. such ath ousand dollars. And this cost is lag almo~t insures that informationcom ing down slowly. presented in the newsletter will be
  5. 5. 30 The Electronic Newsletter dated and does insure that the contributor will have a substantial wait to receive any response or feedback to his or her concepts. In some fields of research this could prove to be deadly. Electronic Bulletin Boards can help to alleviate some of these problems. As an electronic newsletter, the Electronic Bulletin Board would be available to subscribers twenty-four hours a day: That means that professionals who have the means to access the newsletter would be able to do more than just read text when they go "online". With each phone call they could read the newsletter, submit an article, and exchange data or other information with other subscribers. Passwords would prevent unauthorised tampering ~ith information in the newsletter. The system operator/editor could delegate authority to other persons so that they would be responsible for editing and maintaining particualr areas of interest. The editor would make periodic checks of the system to insure proper maintenance of equipment and sufficient file space for news articles and mail. Imagine submitting an article on Monday and receiving critical comments on Tuesday. Imagine having an entire year of selected articles stored on a single five and one quarter inch square piece of magnetic media. Imagine sending notes of a meeti ng to fi ve indivduals in separate locations with one phone call. You have imagined the electronic newsletter.
  6. 6. O.,ri&lrt © 1983 Computer Science Press, Inc. "~d in the United States of America reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form, including- ......tat, microfilm, and xerography, and not in information storage and retrieval systems, ..__• permission in writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer who may quote brief .....ICS in a review or as provided in the Copyright Act of 1976. C.-IJIIIlCf Science Press, Inc. Court _:billie. Maryland 20850 , 1 56 Printing Year 88 87 86858483 y of Con~rtss Cataloging in Publication Data .. ernational Conference on Coapu~er s and the umanities (6th : 1983: orth Carolina State Uni versity) Sixth Internationa l Conference on Computer and Humanities. 1 . Humanities--Data processing--Congresses. ur ton, Sarah K. II. Short. Douglas D. HI. Tit le. 5.156 1983 001.3 "028"54 83-7479 0-914894-96-X
  7. 7. CONTENTSPreface . ... .. . ... . .. . . .. .. .... . . ... .. .. . .. . .. ... .. . .... . .. ... . ... .. ... .. . ..................... . .............. . xProfessional Writing and Computer Programming: Some Parallels O. Jane Allen ........ . ...... .. . . . ... . . . ... . ...... .... . .. . . . . .... .. .. . . ... . . . ... . ............ . ... . .......... .Computers, Creativity, and Composition Valarie M. Arms .. . . ... . .. ... . ..................... . .... . ..... . ... . ........................................ . 4An Edition of Letters: The Computer in Textual Criticism Laurence G.Avery . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... . .... .. ...... . .... . ................... . ... . .. .. .. . .... . ................. . 8The Cincinnati Study: A Computerized Method for Evaluating a Freshman Writing Program James A. Berlin and Rajesh Singha .................. . .... .. ...................................... .. ......... . 13OSUs GAMUT: Semi-intelligent Computer-assisted Music Ear Training~i~:i~ I!:~l~:::! ~d th~ iii~~~~ ~f Mili~~ M;~ ... .. .. .. ... ... .... ................. .... ... .. ..... ~>~ ....... . 14 1. David Bolter . ......... ... .. . . .. . . ..... . .... . ............ . .. ... ... . ... . . . ... ... . .. . ... . . . .. , ...... . ....... . 16Themes, Statistics, and the French Novel Paul Bratley and Paul A. Fortier . ... ... ... . ........... .. .... . .... . .......... . . . .. . . . . ... .. . . . ........ . ....... . 18Software Applicable to the Needs of Student Writers Patricia A. Brenner . ....... .. ... . ... . ..... . ...... ... . .... .. . .... . . . . . ... . .. . . .. . .... ........................ . 26The Electronic Newsletter George Brett . ......... . ... . ........... . ......................... . .................... . ..................... . 28Computer Literacy for Faculty: The Key to Computers in a Liberal Education Jeutonne P. Brewer . ..... . . .. ..... . ... ... ....... . ...... .. ......... . ... . ..... . .. . .. .. .. .. .................... . 31The Uses of Online Bibliographic Searching in Literary Research john Budd .. . ........ ....... .. ... ............ .. . . ......... . ..... . ...... .. .... .. .. .. . .. . . . . . . ... ............. . 39Semantic Links and the Dictionary Nicoletta Calzolari .... . . . . .. ..... .. . .. . ... . ..................... . ...... . .... ... . . ... .. . ... ...... . ... . .... . . . 47Didactical Aspects of the Application of the Microcomputer in the Teaching of Foreign Languages . Tatjana Carev-Maruna . . ... ... ... ........ . ................. . ............. . .. . ...... ... ... . ... ; . ........ .. .. . 51Computers and the Composing Process: Some Observations and Speculations Patricia Ann Carlson .... . ... . . . ...... . ......... . ........ . ......... . ............................... ; ........ . 70Composition and Literature: Learning to Write with Computer Terminals Bruce A. Castner .............. .. .. .. .................... . . . .... . ......................... . ................. . 79A Cat Among the Pigeons: An Opinion of the Effects of the Computer in the Humanities Library Brian Champion ..... ..... .... .. ......... . ...... . ............................ . ...... ~ ...................... . 83Advantages and Problems of Editing Letters on the Computer David R. Cheney ........ . .... . .. ... . .. . ..... .. ..... .. ... . . . ... . .... . ............ . .. . ... . . . .................. . 89Twentieth-Century Technology and Eighteenth-Century Letters: A Case Study of The Papers of Henry Laurens David R. Chesnutt .. . .. ........ .. ........ .. ... : ............ . ................. . .. . ... . ... .. ..... . ........... . 94The Computer Connection: An Interface Between the Sciences and the Humanities James Choike, Robert Darcy, Michael Folk, John Gelder, Richard Rohrs, and Bruce Southard. .......... . ........ . . 104The Roles of Rhetoric and Metaphor in Naturalized Programming: A Sample Microcomputer Application Irad Dean Cole . ............ .,. . ... . ......... . ....... . ... .... ..................... . . . .. ... .................. . IIIThe Problem of Missing Data in Computerized Inventories L.D. Couprie ................................................. . ................. . ..... . ....... ; ............ . 118HlSTIPS (History-Teaching Information Processing System) Donald 1. Dietrich . .. . . . .. . .. ... .... . ............... . .......... . ................. . ....... . ................. . . 120The Literary Politics of Fieldings Amelia: Or, Can a TRS-80 Model II Find Happiness in Working with an18th-Century Novel? Virginia M Doland ...... . .. ...... ....... . .. .. .. . ..... .. . .. ...... .. .. . ..... . .. . .. . ... . ............ ... ...... . 121On the Congruence of Computers and Creativity in the Humanities Eleanor Donoian and George Donoian ........ .. ...... . ........ . .......... . . . ...... . ......................... . 129Computer Techniques Applied in the Compilation of a Bibliography with Index Edwin Ellis . ......... . ....... . ........ .. .. . ......... ... .......................... ... ....................... . 131 v
  8. 8. Word Processors: Methodological and Moral Reflections Frank Elliston and John Snapper . ........................................................................... .. 139Scholar Adventurers and the Electronic Library Terrence Erdt .............................................................................................. . 145Prospect of a Microcomputer System Designed for Automatic Morphoanalysis of Medieval Italian and Latin Luciano F. Farina ...................................................................................... ~... . 146Man and Machines: Two Visions of the Future William R. Ferrell, III . ..................................................................................... . 164Using Individually Based Historical Data for Research in the Humanities and the Social Sciences: Examples from theStockholm Historical Data Base Stefan Fogelvik and Sven Sperlings .......................................................................... . 165Narrative Focalization in Summaries of the Pear Tree Film Richard L. Frautschi .............................................................................. ......... . 178Word Processing in College Composition (or the Direct Use of the Microcomputer in Teaching College Composition) C. Denny Freese and Larry Adams. ................................. : ........................................ . 202Digital Visuals: Computer Graphics for the Visual Artist Darcy Gerbarg . ................ . ........................................................................... . 204From Medieval MSS to Homicide Investigation Anne Gilmour-Bryson ....................................................................................... . 206The Computerization of a Folklore Collection for Mechanical AnalysisA~::~~~;;s~;~ f~; ili~ p~bli~~ti~~ ~fcriti~~l Ecliti~~s; .~~~ ~~. ili; ·C~;;~~ chri~ti~~~Editi~~ ~f ...... ~ ... . 214Augustines De Genesi ad Litteram Michael M. Gorman ...................... .................................................................. . 215A Computer-aided Investigation of Dance Teacher Location Behaviors Judith A. Gray ..... ........................................................................................ . 225Report on "Chips and Changes," an Exhibition Exploring the Social Impact of Microelectronics Sheila Grinell . ............................................................................................. . 233Coping with Resentment: CAl in a Foreign Language Requirement Susan C. Griswold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 239The New Crisis in Education: Impact of Information Technology on Learning Klaus Haefner ............................... . ............................................................... 241Toward a Standard System of Recording and Retrieving Manuscript Information in the Computer: Progress Report Nan L. Hahn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 242The Dictionary of Old English and the Design of its Computer System Antonette diPaolo Healey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 248Computerized Bibliographic Retrieval in Music: A State-of-the-Art Critique Thomas F. Heck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 249The DARMS Plotter: A New Automated Music Output Program William W. Heinemann ...................................................................................... 253The Philosophy of Computer Work and its Implications for the Humanities Bruce Herzberg ............................................................................................. 260The History of Composing Toois and the Future of Word Processing Susan Hilligoss . ........................................................................................... ; 273Universal Access to Information: Impossible Necessity? HJ. Hilton and N. Hilton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 281The Effect of the Computer on the Written Word William Dennis Horn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . .. 282Teaching Electronic English Via Telecommunications David R. Hughes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 287A Novices Guide C. Stuart Hunter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 299Computers and Essay Grading Jack Jobst. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 309Exploring the Application of NT-SYS for Grouping Manuscript Records of a Medieval Text Alan R.P. Journet and Katherine OBrien OKeeffi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 311Synthesis and Harmony in Computer Music James H Justice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 318BASIC Poetry: The Computer as Poet Alfred Kern and James F. Sheridan... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. 323Computer-aided Review Lessons in English Grammar and Spelling Edward A. Kline ............................................................................................ 329 vi
  9. 9. Discontinuous Morphology: Categories and Subcategories in Lexical Processing Arthur E. Kunst . ............................... .. .. . ........................ .. ...................... . ...... . 333Music CAl Programs at Youngstown State University Edward J. Largent, Jr......... ......... ....... .. . ...... ........ . .................... ...... ............. . .... . 339Computer-assisted Instruction for Teaching Languages: Grammar and Beyond Roberta Z. Lavine and Sharon Ahem Fechter . .......... . ..........•.......................... .. ............... 344Reinforcement of Temporal, Personal, and Sound Imagery in Poetic Texts by a Computer AnimatedPrint Mode: Stable Structure of Expressive Meaning Across Deaf and Hearing Readers Arthur Layzer. .. ................................................... . ............... . ....................... . 346The Heroic Jesus: The Affective Plot Structure of Toynbees Christus Patiens Wendy C. Lehnert, Hayward R. Alker, Jr., and Daniel K Schneider ............................................ . 358Bibliographic Data Bases in the Humanities: A Performance Study Anne Leibold .................................. . ...... .... ...................... .... .................... ... . 368Keynote Address: A Midsummer Nights Computer Comedy Edward J. Lias .......... ... .................................................. . .. ........................... . 383A Case for The Book of the Duchess: A Semantic Analysis of Sentence Structure I-Iarry M Logan and Barry W. Miller . .............. .... ................................................. .. .. . 384TF£::f~!~;~~~~ ... ..................................................................................... .Justification of the Formulation and Position of Some Phonological Rules in an Algorithmic Series Generating 391Early Latin from "Indo-European" Albert Maniet . .... .... .. . ......................................................... . ..... .... .... ~ ......... . 401Computers and the Poetic Muse Stephen Marcus . ..... . ... . ............................ .... ... . .......................... ................... . 406On the Construction of a Basic Vocabulary Willy Martin ....................... . ............... ............ ...... ...... ................................ . 410The Mt. Angel Abbey Rare Book and Manuscript Project Revisited: A Case Study inAutomated Cataloguing and Publishing Lawrence J. McCrank and Jay Elvove . ....................................................................... . 415Computing Housmans Fleas: A Statistical Analysis of Manlys Landmark Manuscripts in theGeneral Prologue to The Canterbury Tales Charles Moorman . ........................ ................................................................. . 431A Table-Editor for Comprehensive Statistical Analyses on Microcomputers Dietmar Najock . ... .. ...... ..... ............................ . ..................... .... .... . ................ . 447Self-publishing German Texts with Microcomputers Kenneth G. Negus . ..... . ... . .... ....... .. . ..................................... . ........................... . 454Ip Search of the Purpose of Information in Information Systems Markku L Nurminen ................................. . ... .. ... . ......... .... . . ..... . ....................... . 456A New Approach to Automated Museums J.J. Paijmans ............ . .......................... ... ..................... .. ............................. . 464Micro CAl and Authentic Materials for Second Language Teaching D.M Paramskas . ................................................................... ... .................... . 469Computer-based Conferencing and Its Application in a Statewide Network Louis T. Parker, Jr. . ................................. . ..................................................... . 474The DOM! Project A Feasibility Study to Identify, Structure, and Computerize Databases of Music Information James W. Parrish ............ .. .. ... .......................................... .... ................ . ..... . .. . 479Masking Techniques to Identify and Diagnose Errors in Foreign Language C.A.I. Robert Phillips . ........ . ............................................ .. .......... ..................... ...... . 484Automating Linguistic Atlases Dennis Philps . .............................................................. ........ ....................... . 489A Morphosyntactic Analyzer for Italian • E. Picchi, D. Ratti, A. Saba, and N. Catarsi .................................................................. . 512Metaphysical Implications in Computer-assisted Research in the Humanities: Where are the Philosophers? William G. Plank . .................................... .... ................................................. . 521BIBOUT: MLA Style from a Bibliographic Data Base Rosanne G. Potter . ......................................................................................... . 525Foreign Language Instructional Technology: The State of the Art Constance E. Putnam . ........................ , .......... . .............................. . .................. . 533 ,,Computers in Education: The French Experiment Maryse Quere ... .... ................................................................... .. .................. . 545Teaching Spanish Poetry Via Microcomputer: A Creative, Integral Approach to Becquers RIMAS Robert A. Quinn .. .................. .. .. : ; .................................................................. . 551 vii
  10. 10. Linear Expansion and Redundancy in Natural Language and Art D.L. Rankin and J.F. Crook .. .. ...... . .............. . .. . .................... ·................... ....... . ...... 556 Is Coupling the Custom? Nicholas Ranson and Jean Knepley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 562Writers Workbench System: Heralding a Revolution in Textual Analysis Carol L. Raye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569 Correspondence and Concordances Raymond T. Riva ..... . ............. . ........... . ....................................................... .. .. 573 Computers and the Teaching of Sociology: A Study of the Effects on Learning Isaac A. Robinson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 577Project Rhetor: An Encyclopedia in the History of Rhetoric Kevin P. Roddy . .... . .... . .. .. . . . .. ..... . . . ... . .. .. .. . ............. . .. .. .... . ..... . ....... . .... ~ ........... , 579Do It Yourself, or Else! John R. Russell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 588Artificial Intelligence and Foreign Language Learning Ruth H. Sanders . ........... . ..................................... : ................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 595Fluxions Victor Saucedo . ................... . ....... . ............ . .............. . ............. . ..... . ................ . 600Conceptual Indices and a Conceptual Dictionary as Model for an Automated Retrieval System in Medieval Scholarly Research . Klaus M. Schmidt . ....... . ....... . .. . ..... . .... . ........ . ......... . ................. . ... . ............ j .... . /. 602The Dictionary of American Regional English: From Handwritten Copy to Final Galley ~ Luanne von Schneidemesser . .................................................. . ........... . .............. . .. . 614The Dictionary of American Regional English and Its Use of Computers: Considerations for a Large-Scale Project Luanne von Schneidemesser . ........ . ....................................................................... . 619New Possibilities for Computer Literature Richard Alan Schwartz ..... . ....... . ........ .. ........ . . . .. . ..... . ............. . ........................... . 624 Computer Literacy Leroy Searle . ......... ......... . .... . .. .. .... . . .. .. . ......... . ............................ . ................ . 629Computer-assisted Instruction in Debate: Teaching the Fundamental Thinking Skills Theodore F. Sheckels, Jr. . ...................... .......................................... . .. .. .... . .. . ...... . 636English to Chinese Translation as a Conversion Process Liu Shiao-shu . . .. . ......... . ...... . ....... . ..... . ....... . ................... . . . ............................ . 650Relying on the Weird: Dangers in Editing by Computer Miriam J. Shillingsburg ... . ................................ . .......... . .. . .. . ................... . .......... . 654 Student Generated CAl Materials: The Apple~ Super Pilot Authoring System as aLearning and Teaching Device Sofus E. Simonsen .......................... .. . . ...... . .... . .... . ..... . .............. . ..................... . 659A Data Storage and Retrieval Program for Text Analysis H Jay Siskin . .................................................. . ................ . ............ . ....... . .... . 662Using the Writers Workbench Programs at Colorado State University Charles R. Smith and Kathleen E. Kiefer . ....................... . .... . .. . .......... . ......................... . 672 Can Computers Teach the Humanities? James LeRoy Smith . . ..... . ... . .......................................... . ...................... . .......... . 685Human Attitudes Toward Computers: Paradigms from Fiction C. W. Sullivan, III. .................... . ..... .. ; ...... . ........ . ............................................ . 686DIe Relations of Some Siberian Languages from the Phonostatistical Viewpoint YIITi A. Tambovtsev ................ . ....... .. ...... . ................ . ............. . .. . ..... . ................ . 687KC.. Escher and Computers . A. Tanis ....... . .................... . ................................. . ....... . ................ . ..... . 688 Yars of Computer Instruction in Medical Terminology R. Tebben and Salvatore A. Abate .... . .............................. . ........................ . ........ . 694 lIiiIOOgraphic Searching in the Arts and Humanities Citation Index" b_-.:r Teti . . ................ . ... . ......................... .. ............ . ............................... . 699 for Informations Systems: Computer-aided Design C Rolland, and O. Fouca"!t . .. . .... . .. . ...... . ....... ... ... . . . ....... . ..... ~ ....... . .............. . 701c..._mGc.nted Video Tapes as a Multi-media Program for the Teaching of French. .... .. -....11 Grammar . .... .iIII:I!IIIIS Thomas . . . ............................................... . .. . ........................ . ........ . 708Ci"!IIIKliJR .. Critical Editions: Deduction of Stemmatic Relationships in a Golden Age Text DlrJiIllQS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . .. 714 viii
  11. 11. Beyond Word Crunching Kathleen Turner and Matthew Marino ..................................................................... : .. 717Another Approach to Using Writers Workbench Programs: Small Class Applications William V. Van Pelt . ........................................................ ........ ,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 725Integrating CBE into the Intermediate French Curriculum Janel W. Waisbrot ........................................... ; ...................•............. ; ... . . . . . . . .. 730Humanities Teachers Write Imaginative CAL Deryn M. Watson ............................•.... . ..,," .,....... . ........ .... ... .... .......... ..• .. ... . .... 732Fhit Steps in Automation in the American Office of lAnnee Philologique Jf7/liam C. West............................................................................................ 754Comp1tersUt. Pal~grlWhy , Q.A~M.Af, y.-ahya ......•..: ......•....... :.: ...........: .........•.... .. .... : .•.......... : . . . .. . ........ . .: . . . .. 759 :Co~puter fuuigirig~d the MuSidlilityof DirIiimsJonat"Upgrades on the 2D Plane " . " Ei/WaTd Zqjec: .. .. : . ..•....... ; ...... ;. : .............. •........... :~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . ... . . .. 763The CoDiputer:Oeneilitioriof CharactetltidexestO "classical ChineseTextll Peter H Nancarrow and RiChtird A. Kunst."; .... ................ ~ , ........ ; •..... : ............. , .......... , 772 ix

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