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Obsiety
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Obsiety

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  • 1. Obesity In Children in The UAE 1
  • 2. ContentsIntroduction: .......................................................................................................................... 3Cultural Influences of Obesity in UAE ......................................................................................... 5Childhood Obesity and Diabetes in the UAE:............................................................................... 6Childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes: ..................................................................................... 7Climate, clothing and culture: ................................................................................................... 8Health Risks of Morbid Obesity: ............................................................................................... 10Obesity shortens your life span: ............................................................................................... 11Conclusion : ........................................................................................................................... 12
  • 3. Introduction:Obesity has become a major problem in the UAE. Over 60% of Emirati nationals areoverweight and this figure is expected to rise. The number of overweight or obeseadults and children has continued to increase and is a trend that is not slowing down.According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), it is predicted that there will beover 2.3 billion overweight and 700 million obese individuals by 2015.Obesity in the UAE:Obesity affects not only the individual but also the country that they live in too. Thebiggest effect is for the individual, as being overweight or obese can lead to heartdisease, diabetes and many other health issues. Life expectancy is reduced by as muchas 10-12 years for people that are morbidly obese. For people who are obese, it isinevitable that their quality of life suffers, as it is difficult to enjoy exercise or to movearound freely. Another consequence is the lack of self-esteem. This can lead todepression, eating disorders and crash diets.Another consequence of obesity is that the country of residence is also affected due tothe fact it becomes very expensive for the government to provide advanced medicalcare such as heart transplants or other healthcare provision for certain individuals. 1 1 http://www.weightlosssurgery.ae/obesity-UAE.htm
  • 4. Height Obesity PointFt/inches Meters Pounds Kilos4.10 1.47m 143 pounds 65.0kg4.11 1.50m 148 pounds 67.3kg5.0 1.52m 153 pounds 69.5kg5.1 1.55m 159 pounds 72.3kg5.2 1.57m 164 pounds 74.5kg5.3 1.60m 169 pounds 76.8kg5.4 1.63m 175 pounds 79.5kg5.5 1.65m 180 pounds 81.8kg5.6 1.68m 186 pounds 84.5kg5.7 1.70m 191 pounds 86.8kg5.8 1.73m 197 pounds 89.5kg5.9 1.75m 203 pounds 92.3kg5.10 1.78m 209 pounds 95.0kg5.11 1.80m 215 pounds 97.7kg6.0 1.83m 221 pounds 100.4kg
  • 5. Cultural Influences of Obesity in UAE:Traditional dress in the Middle East is a contributing factor of obesity due to thewearing of loose, flowing garments such as the dish-dash or abayas. Excess weightgained goes relatively unnoticed as they are not wearing close fitting garments such asjeans or shirts. Often when clothes become tight, it signals a warning to control calorieintake but this may not occur if there are no limiting factors.Due to extremely high weather temperatures up to 50 degrees, for a large part of theyear, outdoor activities may be limited and therefore entertainment is often provided athome sat in front of the television. Inactivity and boredom can lead to excessive calorieconsumption resulting in weight gain. In this climate, cars are used frequently to drivevery short distances and exercise is not undertaken.2Being overweight is widely perceived in Arab countries, as well as African andMediterranean countries, as being a sign of good health and financial success. In orderto be effective, any strategies to promote health and prevent lifestyle-driven healthconditions such as diabetes must challenge important socio-cultural obstacles.Many religious occasions, such as fasting for Ramadan and the subsequent celebrationsat the end of Ramadan, bring about altered eating habits. For Ramadan, Muslims fast forthe Holy Month of Ramadan which may predispose to overeating leading up to thefasting month. 2 http://www.weightlosssurgery.ae/childhood_obesity-UAE.htm
  • 6. Childhood Obesity and Diabetes in the UAE:In Arab countries such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) –the economic growth and development of the past three decades have been dramatic.This socio-economic progress has brought benefits to many people in the region, suchas improved access to health care, education, and safe drinking water. However,economic development has set the scene for the transformation of lifestyles, eatinghabits, and traditional societal and family structures in the region. These changes arenot all for the better. In fact, lifestyle-related non-communicable health conditions arehaving an increasingly negative impact on the health of many adults and children.Chronic health conditions, such as diabetes, which are linked both directly andindirectly to behavioral, nutritional and environmental factors, have emerged in recentyears as the leading cause of illness, disability and death in the oil-producing Arabcountries. In the UAE, for example, in recent years, the prevalence of heart-disease riskfactors such as obesity, high levels of blood cholesterol, and high blood pressure were27%, 53%, and 37% respectively. These figures represent significant increases overprevious years.Although the available data on the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the UAE are stilllimited, the condition appears to be a significant problem. According to the results of anational diabetes survey, conducted in 2000 by the Ministry of Health and the WorldHealth Organization (WHO), almost a quarter of the population in the UAE had diabetesof one form or another. Furthermore, it has been reported that deaths attributable todiabetes accounted for 2%-3% of all deaths in the UAE in the last ten years, and that, ifcurrent trends continue, in the next 25 years diabetes will affect as many as half thepeople in the country.
  • 7. Childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes:Childhood obesity in this and some other regions has reached epidemic proportions.Over the past three decades, the number of children with overweight in the USA hasmore than doubled; overweight and obesity in young people are increasing rapidly inthe UK.4 In the developing countries - where large numbers of people continue to adopta lifestyle that is characterized by a high-fat, high-sugar diet and a reduction in physicalactivity – the situation is likely to be worse, contributing significantly to the high globalprevalence of these conditions. Only a few years ago, type 2 diabetes did not affectyoung people in the UAE; nowadays, the condition is seen routinely in children. This isdue principally to the lifestyle changes mentioned above: an increasing incidence ofobesity, driven by a general decline in physical activity and an increased reliance onprocessed food.Factors which further contribute to the large numbers of young people with diabetes inArab populations include: the relatively high percentage of consanguine relationships the elevated genetic risk for diabetes compared to many other populations in the world the widespread use of traditional clothing
  • 8. Climate, clothing and culture:Traditional dress in the Gulf region is signaled as a contributing factor in the stark risein the number of people with obesity. Men and women (or indeed boys and girls) whoregularly wear jeans or trousers are able to perceive their own weight gain as theirclothing becomes tight and uncomfortable. But an expanding waistline easily goesunnoticed in a loose-fitting voluminous robe, such as a ‘dish-dash’ – traditionally wornby men and women in Arab countries. This serves to compound the negative effects ofthe widespread use of television and computers. As in many communities around theworld, watching television is the main leisure activity in the Gulf region. Furthermore,the exceptionally high summer temperatures in countries such as the UAE oftenpersuade people to stay indoors and avoid even light physical exertion. From Junethrough to September, the days are hot and humid with temperatures averaging over40oC (110oF). In these conditions, people, understandably, often choose to ride in anair-conditioned car rather than walking even short distances. In order to be effective,any strategies to promote health and prevent lifestyle-driven health conditions such asdiabetes must challenge important socio-cultural obstacles. As in many African andMediterranean communities, overweight is widely perceived as a desirable feature inthe Arab countries, a sign of good health and financial success. A fundamental change isnecessary in the way walking is popularly perceived: strictly the low income transportoption.3Awareness and education for all Human behavior is strongly influenced by values andbeliefs, and any significant change in this behavior is difficult both to initiate andsustain. For health-care providers, promoting and supporting sustained lifestyle 3 http://www.weightlosssurgery.ae/childhood_obesity-UAE.htm
  • 9. changes requires a range of abilities. Excellent communication skills are essential inorder to develop and maintain understanding and trust in people who are affected byobesity and/or diabetes. Through open and meaningful communication, it is likely thatthe lifestyle advice offered by the health-care provider or through educational programand awareness campaigns will be understood and embraced.Interventions, such as therapeutic health education, the modification of diet, and thepromotion of exercise and home glucose self-monitoring remain the cornerstones ofdiabetes management. Accordingly, diabetes self-management training packages havebeen developed in the UAE. The challenge now is to package and consistently deliverthese interventions in a way that is widely meaningful, and practical in terms of the timeand resources required to reach the optimum number of people. We, the health-careproviders, should play a central role in rising to this challenge. Our communicationissues should be addressed and excellence achieved – as would be the case regardingany other aspect of our work.4Impact on health care Childhood obesity is directly linked to a series of abnormalities inadult life, such as high blood pressure, high blood fat, and irregularities in insulin levels,as well as an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.4 If this epidemicgoes unchecked, the burden on public health spending will grow as children withobesity become young people with diabetes, and the costly complications of theircondition develop. Early prevention is clearly our best option. In the UAE, theprevention of type 2 diabetes in young people through the reduction of childhoodobesity remains a major public health challenge. The Ministry of Health has developed 4 http://www.weightlosssurgery.ae/childhood_obesity-UAE.htm
  • 10. educational program to raise awareness amongst healthcare providers about theprevention and management of diabetes.Children and their families learn about the links between obesity and diabetes throughschool-based health education program. While expectations for such program arelimited due to the lack of diabetes educators and culturally appropriate materials in theregion, primary school health education might hold the key to raising awarenessamongst children and their families and teachers on the prevention of obesity anddiabetes.Health Risks of Morbid Obesity:The truth about Morbid Obesity:Obesity has a direct relationship to the development of heart disease in both men andwomen. This is due to the increased distribution of body fat. You are 3 times as likely tosuffer from hypertension if you are obese compared to those whose weight falls withinthe normal range. The simple fact is that when your weight increases, so does yourblood pressure.Weight loss decreases risk factorsIf you are more than 20% overweight then most likely your health would benefit greatlyfrom losing weight. Experts in the area of morbid obesity believe that those who are lessthan 20% above a healthy weight range should still try to lose weight if they have any ofthe following risk factors:
  • 11. Family history of certain chronic diseases. People with close relatives who have had heart disease or diabetes are more likely to develop these problems if they are obese. Pre-existing medical conditions. High blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or high blood sugar levels are all warning signs of some obesity-associated diseases. "Apple" shape. People whose weight is concentrated around their stomachs may be at greater risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, or cancer than people of the same weight who are "pear-shaped" (they carry their weight in their hips and buttocks).Obesity shortens your life span:Morbid obesity is not just an issue of physical appearance; being significantlyoverweight is a serious hazard to your health. If you are 40% or more overweight, youare twice as likely to die prematurely as someone who is within a healthy weight range.This is because obesity has been linked to several serious medical conditions, including: Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI) Daytime Sleepiness Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes (Type 2) End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Gallbladder Disease Gout
  • 12. Heat Disorders Hypertension Impaired Immune Response Impaired Respiratory Function Infections Following Wounds Infertility Liver Disease Low Back Pain Obstetric and Gynecologic Complications Pain from Morbid Obesity Pancreatitis from Morbid Obesity Sleep Apnea from Morbid Obesity Stroke from Morbid Obesity Urinary Stress Incontinence from Morbid ObesityConclusion :There are no magic pills, no miracles in a bottle. The only way you have fighting chanceof beating obesity is to change your lifestyle. No crash diet or miracle drug is going tocure what has now become an epidemic in the United States. The two best things youcan do for yourself are 1) exercise on a regular basis and 2) control your caloric intake.Keep in mind that these factors are important for everyone, overweight or not, andregardless of whether or not you decide to have gastric bypass surgery.
  • 13. References:CHSD Center for strategic healthcare development :http://www.weightlosssurgery.ae/childhood_obesity-UAE.htmObesity in The UAE Articleshttp://emiratweet.com/ar/2010/10/26/obesity-in-uae/

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