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Sf llw final Sf llw final Presentation Transcript

  • Moving into thesenior phase – how SfLLW works in qualifications
  • Aims• to recognise SfLLW as familiar, commonplace part of learning and teaching• to discuss how they feature in qualifications in the senior phase• to explore thinking round how they might be incorporated into subject/topic areas
  • How familiar are you with the SfLLW framework used in qualifications?Using the tool bottom left select:• Tick = very familiar, can’t tell me any more• Cross= not very/ not at all familiar, can you tell me a bit more? View slide
  • Skills for learning, life and work• Literacy• Numeracy• Health and Wellbeing• Employability, Enterprise and Citizenship• Thinking skills View slide
  • SQA’s Skills Framework: Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Work1 Literacy This is the ability to communicate by reading, by writing, and by listening and talking.2 Numeracy This is the ability to use numbers to solve problems by counting, doing calculations, measuring, and understanding graphs and charts. This is also the ability to understand the results.3 Health and wellbeing This is the ability to take care of yourself and others, and to be responsible for your learning and welfare. It includes managing your feelings, developing a positive and active attitude to life, and building relationships with others.4 Employability, enterprise and citizenship This is the ability to develop skills, understandings and personal attributes — including a positive attitude to work, to others and to the world’s resources.5 Thinking skills This is the ability to develop the cognitive skills of remembering and identifying, understanding, applying, analysing, evaluating, and creating.
  • Which is the most important skillarea for learners, in your opinion?
  • Do you agree?
  • •Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Work will not beautomatically certificated.•The development of these skills is the responsibility of allpractitioners. Learners have an entitlement to opportunitiesdesigned to develop them.• Many of the opportunities to develop the skills will be naturallyoccurring, through learning and teaching activities.•The unit / course specification will highlight the SfLLW that willbe developed in the course of study
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work Learners are expected to develop broad generic skills as an integral part of their learning experience. The Unit Specification lists the skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work that learners should develop through this Course. These are based on SQA’s Skills Framework: Skills for Learning, Skills for Life and Skills for Work and must be built into the Unit where there are appropriate opportunities. The level of these skills will be appropriate to the level of the Unit.
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workComputing & Information Science (National 5)Engineering Science (Higher)History (National 5)Biology (National 4)Art & Design (National 5)English (National 5)
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workDesign and Development National 5 Unit• Numeracy• Employability, enterprise and citizenship• Thinking Skills
  • Design and Development National 5 Unit2 Numeracy2.1 Number processing Learners can be given opportunities to develop their number processing skills by gaining practice in problem solving in numeric-based contexts which involve eg multiplication, division or calculating percentages. Problem solving contexts could then be set in which software would take decisions and vary the output based on the results of calculations.2.3 Information Information handling skills could be developed byhandling setting problem solving contexts in which learners are required to use data set out in tables or a graphical format as the basis for input to their programs which then process the data to produce required output.
  • Design and Development National 5 Unit4 Employability, enterprise and citizenship4.2 Information and Throughout the Unit learners will becommunication technology continuously interacting with the technology around them and will be given abundant opportunities to extend their ICT skills. When producing their report for Outcome 3, they will be given opportunities to specifically develop their ICT-based research, evaluation and decision making skills.
  • Design and Development National 5 Unit5 Thinking skills5.3 Applying Learners will be given opportunities to apply their software-based knowledge and skills and then test their solutions.5.4 Analysing and evaluating Learners will develop skills in analysing and evaluating through the process of researching and completing the report for Outcome 3.
  • Information Systems Design & Development National 5 Unit• Numeracy• Employability, enterprise and citizenship• Thinking Skills
  • Information Systems Design & Development National 5 Unit2 Numeracy2.1 Number processing Learners can be given opportunities to develop their number processing skill by gaining practice in problem solving in numeric-based contexts, eg calculation of main memory, storage requirements, resolution, bit depth and sampling rate, and then making informed decisions based on the results of these calculations.2.3 Information Information handling skills could be developed by setting problem solvinghandling contexts in which learners are required to interpret data in different structure eg flat-files or linked tables in databases, visual layout and navigation for we pages, including appropriate file formats, storage requirements, comparison of current input/output devices using the criteria of speed of data transfer, resolution, cost and capacity.
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workEngineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) Unit• Numeracy• Employability, enterprise & citizenship• Thinking Skills• Other SfLLW
  • Engineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) Unit2 Numeracy2.3 Information handling •Drawing and interpreting system and sub-system diagrams •Interpreting online and other data sources and using these in the design of sub-systems •Calculating values to produce devices with particular characteristics
  • Engineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) Unit4 Employability, enterpriseand citizenship4.2 Information and •Researching engineering applicationscommunication technology using online resources(ICT) •Preparing, delivering and reflecting on a presentation of research findings
  • Engineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) Unit5 Thinking Skills5.2 Understanding •Describing the function of one or more complex engineering systems •Describing the role of engineers within a project •Describing some social, economic and environmental impacts of engineering •Describing how engineering solutions contribute to tackling climate change5.3 Applying •Using knowledge gained from previous learning to design sub-systems which will function in a predetermined way •Testing, reflecting on and modifying sub-systems to perform in the desired way
  • Engineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) UnitThe Unit may also provide opportunities to develop orconsolidate other skills for learning, life and work,including:• reading and writing• number processes• working with others• enterprise and citizenship• evaluating
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workEngineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) Unit• Numeracy• Employability, enterprise & citizenship• Thinking skills
  • Engineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) Unit2 Numeracy2.1 Number processes •Using meters to measure voltage, current and resistance •Problem solving questions applying Ohm’s law to calculate values of resistance, current and voltage •Using variables in arithmetic processes as part of control programming2.3 Information handling •Use of Boolean algebra in analysing and designing logic circuits •Interpreting information on operating characteristics of electronic components from logarithmic graphs •Producing flowcharts and control programs •Producing and interpreting truth tables
  • Engineering Contexts & Challenges (Higher) Unit4 Employability, enterprise &citizenship4.2 Information & communication •Using circuit simulation softwaretechnology (ICT) •Programming of microcontroller systems •Storing evidence (notes, reports, diagrams) in digital format5 Thinking Skills5.3 Applying •Practical problem solving in designing analogue, digital, and programmed control systems •Applying electronic control concepts to real-life example and situations5.4 Analysing & •Testing and evaluating analogue, digital, andevaluating programmed control systems
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workMechanisms & Structures (Higher) Unit• Numeracy• Employability, enterprise & citizenship• Thinking Skills
  • Mechanisms & Structures (Higher) Unit2 Numeracy2.1 Number processes •Using formulae involving torque •Calculating efficiency, work done and power •Calculating forces in frames and reaction forces •Calculating Young’s Modulus and factor of safety •Calculating shear stress and strain •Applying correct units to results2.3 Information handling •Studying diagrams of mechanisms (couplings and bearings) •Building pneumatic systems from diagrams •Drawing diagrams of structures, mechanisms and pneumatic systems •Drawing stress/strain graphs for different materials
  • Mechanisms & Structures (Higher) Unit4 Employability, enterprise &Citizenship4.2 Information & communication •Using simulation packagestechnology (ICT) •Researching mechanisms using online resources5 Thinking Skills5.3 Applying •Applying knowledge of structures, pneumatics and drive systems to solve practical problems •Using calculated results during the design of systems5.4 Analysing & evaluating •Identifying key aspects of a problem •Evaluating mechanical and pneumatic solutions against a specification •Choosing mechanical or pneumatic devices to solve a problem
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workHistory National 5SfLLWReading & WritingUse of historical sources
  • History National 5• The skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work listed above may not be formally assessed by SQA, however Course planners should identify opportunities to enhance these skills throughout the Course. Formative assessment of these skills should be used to provide feedback to learners with advice on how they can be improved. Learners should be aware of the skills they are building and teachers/lecturers can provide advice on opportunities to practice and improve them.• History lends itself to the development of literacy skills, particularly reading and writing. Learners should be encouraged to read as widely as possible and undertake extended writing where appropriate in order to facilitate progression to the Higher History Course and the world of work.• Citizenship will be developed through an examination of Scotland’s place within the world, self- awareness and growing identity.• By studying a European and World time period learners will develop a wider and deeper perspective on significant international historical events and themes.• Thinking skills will be developed across all time periods. Through the nature of historical study, learners will develop their understanding of key issues and key events as well as identifiable skills and they will be able to apply them. The learner will work with a variety of sources of varying difficulties that will develop their ability to understand knowledge and apply this knowledge.• There may also be opportunities for other, additional skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work to be developed in the Course. However, this could vary across centres depending on approaches being used to deliver the Unit in a centre and this should be for individual teachers and lecturers to decide.
  • History National 5Reading and writing• Through completing the Course, learners will have the opportunity to develop many aspects of literacy. For example, they may read a variety of texts about a topic or issue they are studying, including a range of newspapers in print or electronic form. They may study these alongside academic research or government reports at an appropriate level. This means that they will also be able to consider many different types of text and consider their benefits and limitations in terms of providing information to help them complete their assignment.• This Course also allows for considerable scope for the development of writing skills. Although learners need not present the evidence for assessment in written form, it is likely that it will involve at least some written work (although this is not essential). Candidates may describe and summarise the research they have carried out, assess and evaluate the value of different sources, and express opinions and viewpoints, as well as personally reflect upon what has been learned. The range of styles of written response to the topic or issue is very wide.
  • History National 5Use of historical sources• In this Course learners will encounter and use a wide range of sources of information. Learners should be able to interpret and evaluate historical source material. They should be able to record and display information in various forms derived from a variety of sources, such as books, notes, lessons and the internet. Source evaluation exercises, creating presentations, movies, role plays, debates, class discussion, extended writing, interviewing members of the public, investigation tasks, the creation of timelines, individual work, and group work will all help develop skills needed for the world of work.• Further exemplification of how skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work may be developed can be found in the History (National 5) Unit Support Notes.
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workBiology National 4• Numeracy• Thinking Skills• Literacy, Working with Others, Creating & Citizenship
  • Biology National 4Numeracy• 2.1 Number processes• Number processes means solving problems arising in everyday life through carrying out calculations, when dealing with data and results from experiments/investigations and everyday class work, making informed decisions based on the results of these calculations and understanding these results• 2.2 Money, time and measurement• This means using and understanding time and measurement to solve problems and handle data in a variety of biology contexts, including practical and investigative• 2.3 Information handling• Information handling means being able to interpret biological data in tables, charts and other graphical displays to draw sensible conclusions throughout the Course. It involves interpreting the data and considering its reliability in making reasoned deductions and informed decisions. It also
  • Biology National 4Thinking skills• 5.3 Applying• Applying is the ability to use existing information to solve biological problems in different contexts, and to plan, organise and complete a task such as an investigation.• 5.4 Analysing and evaluating• This covers the ability to identify and weigh-up the features of a situation or issue in biology and use judgement of them in coming to a conclusion. It includes reviewing and considering any potential solutions.
  • Biology National 4• Literacy• Learners develop the literacy skills to effectively communicate key biology concepts and describe, clearly, biology issues in various media forms. Learners will have opportunities to communicate knowledge and understanding, with an emphasis on applications and environmental, ethical and/or social impacts. Learners will have opportunities to develop listening and reading skills when gathering and processing information.• Working with Others• Learning activities provide many opportunities, in all areas of the Course, for learners to work with others. Practical activities and investigations, in particular, offer opportunities for group work, which is an important aspect of biology and should be encouraged.• Creating• Through learning in biology, learners can demonstrate their creativity. In particular, when planning and designing experiments/investigations, learners have the opportunity to be innovative in their approach. Learners also have the opportunities to make, write, say or do something new.• Citizenship• Learners will develop citizenship skills, when considering the applications of biology on our lives, as well as environmental and ethical implications.
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workArt & Design National 5Creative MethodsSfLLWHealth & wellbeing
  • Art & Design National 5Creative Methods• Teachers/lecturers could, for example, use a practical demonstration of materials and specific techniques, an extract of text/imagery or music to evoke a mood or feeling, or a class presentation on a specific artist or designers as a starting point for creative learning.• Creative ideas can also be developed in response to an external theme or topic, for example sustainability. This type of approach can be useful in providing contextualised learning experiences through Art and Design that relate to other areas of the curriculum. There could be opportunities to use a combined approach to developing practical work across the Course, for example by using a sketchbook approach to collect and document the development of creative ideas. This approach may be beneficial if using a common stimulus for both expressive and design contexts.
  • Art & Design National 5Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work• It is important that learners have opportunities to develop broad generic skills as an integral part of their learning experience. Most of these listed generic skills will not be formally assessed by SQA. They will rely on the expertise of delivery staff and curriculum planners to ensure that opportunities are provided for learners to enhance all of the skills needed to be successful in further learning, in their lives and for work purposes.• Teachers/lecturers should make learners aware of the skills, knowledge and understanding that they are developing throughout the Course. There are many opportunities to develop these skills in day-to-day teaching and learning activities in the classroom.• A variety of skills for learning, skills for life and skills for work will be developed in the Art and Design (National 5) Course. These include: – 3 Health and wellbeing – 3.1 Personal learning – 5 Thinking skills – 5.3 Applying – 5.4 Analysing – 5.5 Creating
  • Art & Design National 53 Health and wellbeing skills• 3.1 Personal learning• The development of thinking skills is related to the development of personal learning. Applied thinking skills could be evidenced by keeping annotated sketchbooks/logs/blogs or folios and seeing evidence of personal creative decision making in the work produced by learners. This type of ongoing analysis and critical reflection by learners could be used to help teachers/lecturers monitor learner progress and to help learners identify next steps for learning.• Learners may also wish to draw on evidence they produce from the Course to contribute to Literacy and/or Numeracy Units. Although literacy skills are not formally recognised in the Course, the teaching and learning approaches used by teachers/lecturers could provide opportunities to focus on the development of literacy skills in the Course.• However, care needs to be taken to suggest these as realistic and optional — the drive for skills development should not constitute a barrier for learners. It should instead open up greater opportunities for personalisation and choice.• Teachers/lecturers should also think about the sort of assessment approaches that encourage different kinds of skills. Additional advice and guidance on useful assessment approaches for skills building is given in the @approaches to assessment’ section below.
  • Developing skills for learning, skills for life and skills for workEnglish National 5Learners are expected to develop broad generic skills as an integral part oftheir learning experience. The Course Specification lists the skills for learning,skills for life and skills for work that learners should develop through thisCourse. These are based on SQA’s Skills Framework: Skills for Learning, Skillsfor Life and Skills for Work and must be built into the Course where there areappropriate opportunities. The level of these skills will be appropriate to thelevel of the Course.• 1 Literacy• 1.1 Reading• 1.2 Writing• 1.3 Listening and talking• 5 Thinking skills• 5.3 Applying• 5.4 Analysing and evaluating
  • How are you going to make itwork ( better?) in your area?Take a minute - Use chat box
  • On comments from out and about... What are your thoughts about this? How do you think that happens? How do you do it just now? How do you think you might do it in future?
  • How well did we meet our aims? Quick poll
  • Things that can helpSQA websiteSfLLW frameworkSfLLWtoolkit ( SQA secure site)SfLLW SQA Academy Courseor speak to usRuth OhldagCharlie O’DonnellMargaret Tierney
  • Any questions? Thank you!