Brenda HoddinottI-01 BEGINNER: CARTOONS& CRITTERSWith a focus on improving your observation skills, this project offers si...
-2-    PUTTING PUPPY PROPORTIONS ON PAPER    In this section, your goal is to sketch Fluppy’s head, ears, and facial featu...
-3-                              ILLUSTRATION 01-04                                                                       ...
-4-    7.     Sketch several lines to represent the placement of his ears on either side of the top           section of h...
-5-    8.     Pat your entire drawing with a kneaded eraser, until all your sketch lines become so           light that yo...
-6-    Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the    shading lines, ...
-7-                                                                        ILLUSTRATION 01-12    14.    With a 2H         ...
-8-                               ILLUSTRATION 01-14                                                                      ...
-9-    19.    Add shading to his ears with curved hatching lines and medium to dark values.           To keep the wild and...
- 10 -    BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIO    As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrat...
CANINE                                                                          Brenda HoddinottI-02 BEGINNER: CARTOONS & ...
-2-    FRONTAL VIEW OF A DOG NOSE    This lesson challenges you to rely on your visual skills rather than text instruction...
-3-    In steps 5 to 15 you outline the nose, and add a few sections of fur above and below it.                         ST...
-4-                           STEP 9                                                           STEP 10                    ...
-5-                    STEP 13                                                                          STEP 14           ...
-6-                          STEP 16                                                                In steps 16 to 18, you...
-7-                                                                                   STEP 18    A full range of values gi...
-8-    ANGULAR VIEW OF A DOG NOSE    People who love dogs simply can’t resist that adorable tilt of their heads as they lo...
-9-                                                                                 ILLUSTRATION 02-04    4.     Very ligh...
- 10 -                                                                        ILLUSTRATION 02-07    7.     Add a combinati...
- 11 -                                                                   ILLUSTRATION 02-09    11.    Use your           k...
- 12 -    BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY    As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and ill...
OF A DOG                                                Brenda Hoddinott                                                I-...
-2-    THE PARTS OF A DOG’S EYE    Artists often become overwhelmed by too much visual information when trying to simplify...
-3-    ESTABLISHING DOG EYE PROPORTIONS    Drawing Shadow’s eye enhances your visual abilities, by exercising your freehan...
-4-                                                                              ILLUSTRATION 03-06    2)     Add another ...
-5-                                                                              ILLUSTRATION 03-09    4)     Outline a hi...
-6-    BRINGING THE EYE TO LIFE WITH SHADING    Gather your drawing pencils and prepare to add shading to Shadow’s eye. Sh...
-7-                 In this lesson you use different grades of pencils, from hard to soft, to help    draw the different v...
-8-    10) Use a 6B pencil to add dark shading to the pupil, and the outer and upper sections of        the iris.    11) A...
-9-    13) Use a 6B pencil, to add several narrow wiggly sections of shading that extend from the        perimeter of the ...
- 10 -    BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY    As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and ill...
FUR             Brenda HoddinottI-04 BEGINNER: CARTOONS & CRITTERSIf you happen to like Dalmatians or cows, you’ll love le...
-2-INTRODUCTIONTo capture spotted fur in a drawing, you use dark values for the spots and light values for theareas that a...
-3-1)     Use a ruler to draw a       rectangle (a drawing space)       in which to draw your       spotted fur.       Sug...
-4-PLAYING WITH FURRY HATCHING LINESIn this section you experiment with making different values of a fuzzy texture.6)     ...
-5-9)     Draw a bunch of hatching lines of different lengths in all the areas without spots.       Assuming a light sourc...
-6-Brenda HoddinottAs a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda utiliz...
Brenda HoddinottI-05 BEGINNER: CARTOONS & CRITTERSIn this lesson you use simple hatching lines to render the texture and p...
-2-   PLAYING WITH PATTERN AND TEXTURE   To capture the pattern of striped fur in a drawing, you use dark and light values...
-3-                     ILLUSTRATION 05-03                                                                              2)...
-4-                       ILLUSTRATION 05-05                                                                              ...
-5-   DRAWING ON YOUR OWN: FURRY STRIPES   In this section you are challenged to enhance your observation skills while dra...
-6-                                  ILLUSTRATION 05-10                                                                   ...
-7-                              ILLUSTRATION 05-12                                                                       ...
-8-                                     ILLUSTRATION 05-14                                                                ...
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
Incepatori i desene animate si creaturi
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  1. 1. Brenda HoddinottI-01 BEGINNER: CARTOONS& CRITTERSWith a focus on improving your observation skills, this project offers simple illustratedinstructions, to guide aspiring artists through the process of sketching the proportions of acartoon of Fluppy the puppy, and then developing and working with a shading map to add simpleshading with hatching lines.The following two sections guide you step-by-step through this project: PUTTING PUPPY PROPORTIONS ON PAPER: In this section, your goal is to sketch Fluppy’s head, ears, and facial features on your drawing paper proportionately correct OUTLINING AND SHADING FLUPPY: In this section, you outline Fluppy with thin neat lines. Keep your pencils sharpened so your lines stay crisp and thin. You then plan and implement a strategy for adding shading to his nose to create the illusion of a three dimensional form, and add a few extra details.You need basic drawing supplies including good quality white paper, different grades of graphitepencils (such as 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B), kneaded and vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. This project is recommended for artists from age 10 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 10 PAGES – 16 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised 2006)
  2. 2. -2- PUTTING PUPPY PROPORTIONS ON PAPER In this section, your goal is to sketch Fluppy’s head, ears, and facial features on your drawing paper proportionately correct. A sketch is a quickly rendered drawing that illustrates the important elements of your drawing subject with very few details. Sketching refers to the method used for creating a quick, rough representation or outline of a planned drawing subject. A sketch can also be a completed work of art. Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. ILLUSTRATION 01-01 1. Use an HB pencil to sketch a wide oval as Fluppy’s head. As you draw, rotate your paper and look at the oval from different perspectives. Leave lots of space on your drawing paper above, below, and on either side of the oval for Fluppy’s ears and muzzle. Feel free to lightly draw a line of symmetry down the center of your page to help guide you through the process of making both sides of his face the same. ILLUSTRATION 01-02 Symmetry refers to a balanced arrangement (sometimes called a mirror image) of lines and/or shapes on opposite sides of an often-imaginary centerline. 2. Lightly sketch a large horizontal oval, slightly lower than halfway down the head, as Fluppy’s big nose. 3. Add a short straight vertical line under the nose to mark the division line of both halves of the muzzle. If you are using a line of symmetry, this short line will overlap the symmetry line. Examine the reflection of your drawing in a mirror to help locate problem areas. Remember to keep your lines very light!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  3. 3. -3- ILLUSTRATION 01-04 4. Sketch two fuzzy circular shapes below his nose as his muzzle. Each side of the muzzle meets at the center vertical line under the nose. Also take note of the small triangular shape at the very bottom of his head, between the two muzzle sections. This is his chin on which his mouth will be later added. ILLUSTRATION 01-05 5. Add two small ovals above his nose as his eyes. The eyes are the same size and the same distance from the line of symmetry. Feel free to measure the distances with a ruler before you draw if you want to be really precise. 6. Sketch a circular shape on his chin (in between the two halves of his muzzle) as his mouth.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. 4. -4- 7. Sketch several lines to represent the placement of his ears on either side of the top section of his head. These lines are unevenly spaced and of various lengths. Also, observe the different directions in which the lines curve. ILLUSTRATION 01-06 OUTLINING FLUPPY AND SHADING HIS NOSE In this section, you outline Fluppy with thin neat lines. Keep your pencils sharpened so your lines stay crisp and thin. You then plan and implement a strategy for adding shading to his nose to create the illusion of a three dimensional form. Always place a piece of clean paper under your hand as you draw. Each time you work on a new section, remember to move your paper so it’s always under your hand. This prevents you from smudging your drawing, and protects the paper from the oils in your skin.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. 5. -5- 8. Pat your entire drawing with a kneaded eraser, until all your sketch lines become so light that you can barely see them. 9. Using the original sketch lines as guidelines, use a 2B pencil to draw dark fuzzy lines around the perimeter of Fluppy’s head, muzzle, and chin. These raggedy lines curve in many directions, are unevenly spaced, and of various lengths. Keep your pencil sharpener and sandpaper block handy so your lines stay thin and crisp. 10. Outline the dark lines that represent the ears and the tiny hairs between his ears with a 2B pencil. ILLUSTRATION 01-07Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. 6. -6- Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils. The oval and crescent outlines on the nose (in Illustration 01-08) represent a shading map which provides a guideline for adding the different values to the nose as follows: Number 1: The highlight stays the white of the paper. A highlight is the brightest area of a form where light bounces off its surface and is usually the section closest to the light source. Number 2: The largest section of the nose will be shaded with light and medium values. Number 3: The crescent shape will be shaded with a dark value. ILLUSTRATION 01-08 11. Use an HB pencil to very lightly outline a small horizontal oval in the upper left section of the nose. Don’t apply any pressure to your pencil – just the weight of the pencil itself will provide a very light outline that can be easily erased. 12. Outline a crescent shape toward the lower right. 13. Practice drawing three different values with hatching lines (You need your 2H, HB, and 2B pencils). Hatching is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion of values. Use a 2H to draw the light value, an HB for the middle value, and a 2B for the dark value. Take note that each value is lighter on the left. This graduation of values is accomplished by gradually pressing harder on your pencil as you work toward the right. ILLUSTRATION 01-09 ILLUSTRATION 01-10 ILLUSTRATION 01-11Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  7. 7. -7- ILLUSTRATION 01-12 14. With a 2H pencil add shading to the large section of his nose. Observe that my hatching lines are mostly parallel to one another. The final shading on a smooth surface tends to appear smoother if all the hatching lines, including the dark and middle ones, are all angled in the same direction. ILLUSTRATION 01-13 15. Add middle values around the outer edges of the crescent shape with an HB. Leave a rim of light shading along the lower right edge. 16. With a 2B pencil, add dark values to the center sections of the crescent shape.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  8. 8. -8- ILLUSTRATION 01-14 17. Add medium values to his chin with fuzzy hatching lines. The hatching lines seem to originate from the center of the lower section of the muzzle, and then spread outward in a fan shape. ILLUSTRATION 01-15 18. Add several curved hatching lines around the perimeter of the upper section of his head and both sides of his snout. Watch carefully the directions in which the lines curve. In essence, they are curving around the perceived forms of his head and snout.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  9. 9. -9- 19. Add shading to his ears with curved hatching lines and medium to dark values. To keep the wild and wonderful fuzzy texture of his ears, make the shading lines a little shorter than the initial outlines, and a little darker closer to his head. Also take note that the lines are raggedy looking and of various lengths. 20. Erase any sketch lines, fingerprints, or smudges with your kneaded eraser molded to a point (or a sharp edge of your vinyl eraser), sign your name, and put today’s date on the back of your drawing. ILLUSTRATION 01-16Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  10. 10. - 10 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIO As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. These sites offer downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (March 4, 2003): Published by Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (August 2004): Published by Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  11. 11. CANINE Brenda HoddinottI-02 BEGINNER: CARTOONS & CRITTERSThis project challenges you to draw two dog noses from slightly different perspectives. You mayfind the lessons in D Beginner: Squirkling extremely helpful as you try your hand at squirklinggraduations of textured shading.This lesson is divided into the following two parts: FRONTAL VIEW OF A DOG NOSE: You draw a simple frontal view of a dog nose, while being challenged to rely on visual skills rather than text instructions. ANGULAR VIEW OF A DOG NOSE: People who love dogs simply can’t resist that adorable tilt of their heads as they look at your face and listen attentively. Naturally, when the head is tilted, the nose must also be drawn at an angle.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneadedand vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. 12 PAGES – 28 ILLUSTRATIONS This project is recommended for artists from age 12 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised 2006)
  12. 12. -2- FRONTAL VIEW OF A DOG NOSE This lesson challenges you to rely on your visual skills rather than text instructions. The initial sketch lines throughout Steps 1 to 4 establish proportions. A Sketch is a simple drawing that captures the integral aspects of your subject quickly and efficiently. Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. STEP 1 STEP 2 The sketch lines and the outlines look dark in many of my illustrations. However, in reality they are so light that I can barely see them. I have made them look darker in a computer program so you can see them. Keep your lines very light by pressing very gently with your pencil (I used an HB). No matter how careful you are, accidents do happen, and you may need to erase sections you aren’t happy with. STEP 3 STEP 4Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  13. 13. -3- In steps 5 to 15 you outline the nose, and add a few sections of fur above and below it. STEP 5 STEP 6 The faint lines used to indicate the fur above and below the nose are ragged and uneven, and are also various lengths and thicknesses. As you sketch, constantly check the relationships of lines and spaces to one another. Note whether the sizes and proportions are accurate, and adjust as needed. Pay close attention to the shapes created by the spaces. STEP 7 STEP 8 As you complete each step, compare your drawing to mine to make sure you haven’t missed something. If you’re not happy with some of the lines you draw, simply erase that section, redraw the lines, and keep on going.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  14. 14. -4- STEP 9 STEP 10 STEP 12 A kneaded eraser works well for erasing rough sketch lines. STEP 11Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  15. 15. -5- STEP 13 STEP 14 Draw slowly! Accuracy is more important than speed. Your speed will automatically improve the more you practice. Don’t forget that you can turn your sketchbook around as you draw. STEP 15 Always place a piece of clean paper under your Remember, hand as you draw. learning to Each time you work on see as an a new section, remember to move your artist is the paper so it’s always very under your hand. foundation This prevents you from of smudging your drawing, and protects drawing. the paper from the oils in your skin.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  16. 16. -6- STEP 16 In steps 16 to 18, you add shading to the nose with squirkling. Squirkling is an easy method of shading, in which randomly drawn curved lines (called squirkles) combine squiggles and scribbles with circles to create textured values. Texture is the surface detail of an object, as defined in a drawing with various shading techniques. The senses of touch and sight help identify the surface texture of drawing subject. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils. Before you begin shading, use your kneaded eraser to lighten your lines until they are so light that you can barely see them. STEP 17 Consider using the following pencils: 2H - primary highlight (A highlight is the brightest area of a form where light bounces off its surface and is usually the section closest to the light source) HB - highlights on the nostrils and the light values surrounding the primary highlight. 2B - darker shading in the shadow sections 4B - darkest values inside the nostrils Keep in mind that you can achieve a full range of different values with squirkling by using various pencils, and by varying the density of the lines and the pressure used in holding your pencils.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  17. 17. -7- STEP 18 A full range of values gives contrast between the light and the shadow areas. Contrast refers to the comparison of different values when put beside one another, and an invaluable tool for heightening the effects of composition. A combination of dots and tiny squirkle lines provides the fun texture to all sections of the nose. To make a section darker simply add more squirkling lines. To lighten a section, pat it very gently and carefully with a kneaded eraser that is molded to a point. Examine the nose you just drew as part of a drawing of a Jack Russell named Isaac. Sign your name, put today’s date on the back of your drawing, and put a big smile on your face! Continue on to the next section and try your hand at drawing a dog nose from an angle, which is slightly more challenging.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  18. 18. -8- ANGULAR VIEW OF A DOG NOSE People who love dogs simply can’t resist that adorable tilt of their heads as they look into your eyes and listen attentively. Naturally, when the head is tilted, the nose is also drawn at an angle. ILLUSTRATION 02-01 1. Lightly sketch the shape of a dog nose at an angle. Take note of how the nostril on the right is considerably higher than the other. Also, the lines outlining the overall shape of the nose are at an angle rather than horizontal and vertical. ILLUSTRATION 02-02 2. Redraw the outline of the nose with nice neat lines. Take note of the shape of the lower part of the nose and the v-shape in the center of the very bottom section. ILLUSTRATION 02-03 To keep your drawing neat, erase the rough sketch lines as you complete each section. 3. Add the outlines of the nostrils.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  19. 19. -9- ILLUSTRATION 02-04 4. Very lightly outline crescent shaped sections under the nostrils. These crescent shapes will be left very light to help make the noses look three dimensional. ILLUSTRATION 02-05 5. Add two circular shapes as highlights on the main section of the nose. These sections will be lighter than the rest of the nose to help make it look shiny. ILLUSTRATION 02-06 6. Use HB and 2B pencils, and graduated squirkling, to shade the various values. The light source is from the upper left. As you add more shading, remember that the values need to be slightly lighter on the upper left, closer to the light source.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  20. 20. - 10 - ILLUSTRATION 02-07 7. Add a combination of dots and tiny squirkles below the nostrils and on the main section of the nose. 8. Use a 2B to add darker shading to the sections in shadow. 9. Fill in the nostrils with a 4B. ILLUSTRATION 02-08 I prefer to leave the gorgeous texture of squirkles on a dog’s nose, without blending. However, if you’d like to try blending continue on! Blending is the process of rubbing shading lines with a blending tool (such as tissue or paper towel) to evenly distribute the drawing medium over the surface of the paper, thereby achieving a silky smooth graduation of values. 10. Gently blend the lighter sections of shading with a Q-tip or Kleenex.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  21. 21. - 11 - ILLUSTRATION 02-09 11. Use your kneaded eraser to re- lighten the highlights after blending. 12. Add a few more dots to enhance the texture of the nose. Check out this drawing of a Jack Russell named Jumpin’ Jack, and observe the nose you just drew as part of a dog portrait. Add your name and today’s date to the back of your drawing, and go hug your dog!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  22. 22. - 12 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  23. 23. OF A DOG Brenda Hoddinott I-03 INTERMEDIATE: CARTOONS & CRITTERSThis simple project, features an eye of Shadow the Dalmatian, and is drawn completely freehand.After sketching the outlines, you add different values with help from four different grades ofpencils, 2H, HB, 4B, and 6B. Throughout the lesson, I discuss the process of rendering asimplified drawing from a detailed photograph.The key to simplifying a drawing when working from a photograph is to make sure you are veryfamiliar with the visual structure of your subject. Artists often become frustrated andoverwhelmed by too much visual information when trying to visually simplify a complex imageand subsequently draw it accurately.“Eye of a Dog” is divided into the following three sections: THE PARTS OF A DOG’S EYE: To draw a dog’s eye correctly, you first need to find out as much as possible about its various parts. ESTABLISHING DOG EYE PROPORTIONS: Drawing Shadow’s eye enhances your visual abilities, by exercising your freehand drawing skills. In this section, your goal is to sketch her eye proportionately correct. BRINGING THE EYE TO LIFE WITH SHADING: Gather your drawing pencils and prepare to add shading to Shadow’s eye. In addition to its basic triangular shape, a realistic dog’s eye drawn from this angle, needs to illustrate its three dimensional forms as defined by a light source, in this case from the right.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, 2H, HB, 4B, and 6Bgraphite pencils, kneaded and vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. This project is recommended for fine art educators, and artists from age 12 to adult with limited drawing skills. 10 PAGES – 15 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised 2006)
  24. 24. -2- THE PARTS OF A DOG’S EYE Artists often become overwhelmed by too much visual information when trying to simplify a complex image. The drawing in this project is based on this photograph of ILLUSTRATION 03-01 the eye of a Dalmatian named Shadow. Observe that the iris, pupil, and two tiny segments of the white of the eye take up most of the visible sections. In order to draw a dog’s eye correctly, you first need to find out as much as possible about its various parts. Refer to the drawing below, and identify each of the following. 1. Iris: the large circular shape that varies in value from very light to very dark. Tiny muscles in the iris radiate outward from the pupil to help it open and close. In profile, the eyeball is not a perfect sphere; the cornea of the iris bulges slightly outward. 2. White of the Eye: the primary section of the eyeball. The white of the eye is generally rendered with light to medium values. 3. Outer Corner: the outermost section of the eye. 4. Upper Eyelid: a movable fold of skin that opens and closes to protect the eyeball. 5. Highlight: a bright spot(s) or section(s) where light bounces off the shiny surface of the eye. 6. Pupil: the dark circle inside the iris often has the darkest values of the entire drawing. The pupil of an eye is similar to the aperture in the lens of a camera; it opens and closes, as the levels of light become brighter or darker. 7. Inner corner: a ILLUSTRATION 03-02 small triangular shape in the inside corner of the eye. 8. Lower eyelid: a fold of skin protecting the lower section of the eyeball.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  25. 25. -3- ESTABLISHING DOG EYE PROPORTIONS Drawing Shadow’s eye enhances your visual abilities, by exercising your freehand drawing skills. In this first section, your goal is to sketch her eye proportionately correct. Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. 1) Use slightly curved lines to draw a triangular shape with rounded corners. Examine the next three step-by-step drawings. Curved lines are created when a straight line curves (or bends). Shape refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. ILLUSTRATION 03-03 ILLUSTRATION 03-04 ILLUSTRATION 03-05 Use an HB pencil, and keep your lines very light so they can be easily erased. Pay close attention to the lengths, angles, and curves of the various lines. For example, take note that the lower line is more rounded than the other two and the curved line on the right is shorter than the others. Constantly double check the proportions of your sketch as you work your way through this project, and modify if needed.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  26. 26. -4- ILLUSTRATION 03-06 2) Add another curved line inside the triangular shape. Take note of the points where the line intersects two sides of the triangular shape. Also, this line is more curved at the top. ILLUSTRATION 03-07 3) Add two more curved lines to represent the outline of the iris of the eye. Refer to Illustrations 03-07 and 03- 08. ILLUSTRATION 03-08 While these two curved lines outline a segment of a round shape, the upper and lower sections appear to be under the dog’s eyelids. Turn your drawing around in various directions, and view it from different perspectives, to double check that the iris looks like a round shape.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  27. 27. -5- ILLUSTRATION 03-09 4) Outline a highlight in the upper right section of the iris. The light source is from the right. Light source refers to the direction from which a dominant light originates. The light source tells you where to draw all the light values and shadows. In the interest of originality, feel free to make your highlight an oval, circle shape, or even a curved teardrop- shape. ILLUSTRATION 03-10 5) Draw a circular shape inside the iris as the pupil. The pupil is quite small when compared to the iris. Take note that the highlight appears to overlap the pupil. Also, because of the angle of the eye, the pupil is drawn closer to the right of the iris than the left.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  28. 28. -6- BRINGING THE EYE TO LIFE WITH SHADING Gather your drawing pencils and prepare to add shading to Shadow’s eye. Shading refers to the various shades of gray (values) in a drawing that make drawings look three-dimensional. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils. In addition to its basic triangular shape, a realistic dog’s eye drawn from this angle, needs to illustrate its three dimensional forms as defined by a light source, in this case from the right. Form, as applied to drawing, is the illusion of the three-dimensional structure of a shape, such as a circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective. 6) Add light values to the visible section of the ILLUSTRATION 03-11 white of the eye on the right. Use hatching lines and a 2H pencil and try to have your shading lines all going in the same direction. Hatching is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion of values. In my drawing the lines are all angled upward to the right. 7) Use a 2H pencil to add light values to the iris. Take note that the highlight and pupil are left white. ILLUSTRATION 03-12 8) Use an HB pencil to add medium values. Use hatching lines to shade in the inside section of the upper eyelid, the upper right and lower left sections of the iris, and the small visible section of the white of the eye on the left. The values need to be darker toward the outside edges of the iris to create the illusion that the cornea of the iris bulges slightly outward from the eyeball.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  29. 29. -7- In this lesson you use different grades of pencils, from hard to soft, to help draw the different values. However, you can also create different values by varying the density (placing lines either far apart or close together) of the individual hatching lines and/or the pressure applied to the paper while holding various pencils to draw. 9) Use a 4B pencil to add dark values to sections of the eye. Add darker shading to: the upper part of the iris, and around the perimeter of the lower half of the iris the upper and lower sections of the inner edge of the upper eyelid the parts of the whites of the eyes on both sides of the iris that are in shadow ILLUSTRATION 03-13 Remember, to make an area darker, you simply add more shading with a soft pencil. To make an area lighter, use your kneaded eraser, molded to a point, to slowly and gently pat off some of the graphite in that section.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  30. 30. -8- 10) Use a 6B pencil to add dark shading to the pupil, and the outer and upper sections of the iris. 11) Add darker shading to the sections of the whites of the eye closest to the upper eyelid. Use your 6B pencil. These dark values illustrate the cast shadows from the upper eyelids, ILLUSTRATION 03-14 12) With your 6B pencil add darker shading to the upper, lower, and outer sections of the inner section of the upper eyelid. If you enjoy drawing fur, try your hand at drawing Shadow’s face and neck. You can find this project, T-02 Advanced: Diverse Anim als in the advanced section of my website.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  31. 31. -9- 13) Use a 6B pencil, to add several narrow wiggly sections of shading that extend from the perimeter of the iris a little ways inward toward the center of the pupil. These lines illustrate the tiny muscles that are visible in the irises of most eyes. These eye muscles are also in human eyes, and involuntarily work to help the pupil open and close as light conditions change. ILLUSTRATION 03-15 Remember, learning to draw is like learning to play piano. Don’t expect perfection with your first few tries. Plan to practice often, and expect to make lots of mistakes. Check out M-03 Detailed Dog Eye in the Intermediate: Animals and Fantasy section and challenge yourself with a more detailed version of this dog eye. This lesson focuses on drawing the fur-textured forms around the eye, and uses blending to make the eye look shiny.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  32. 32. - 10 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  33. 33. FUR Brenda HoddinottI-04 BEGINNER: CARTOONS & CRITTERSIf you happen to like Dalmatians or cows, you’ll love learning how to use hatching lines to drawboth the texture and pattern of spotted fur.This lesson is divided into the following five sections: INTRODUCTION: To capture spotted fur in a drawing, you define both the pattern and the texture. OUTLINING SPOTS OF DIFFERENT SHAPES AND SIZES: You outline the shapes of some spots inside a rectangular drawing space. PLAYING WITH FURRY HATCHING LINES: You experiment with making different values of a fuzzy texture. The hatching lines are unevenly spaced and of many different lengths and thicknesses. ADDING TEXTURE TO SPOTTED FUR: The base (or background) of the spotted fur is drawn with mostly light values and the spots are rendered with dark values. CHALLENGE: You are challenged to draw spotted fur with two additional techniques.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white paper, 2H, HB, 2B, and 4B pencils,erasers, and a pencil sharpener. This lesson is recommended for artists and aspiring artists of all skill levels and ages, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 6 PAGES – 10 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Publishing, Halifax, NS, Canada 2003 (Revised 2006)
  34. 34. -2-INTRODUCTIONTo capture spotted fur in a drawing, you use dark values for the spots and light values for theareas that are light. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varyingboth the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils.In addition to having a spotted pattern, spotted fur also has a fuzzy texture. Pattern refers to thedifferent values on the surface of your subject as identified by your sense of sight. Texture is thesurface detail of an object, as identified by your senses of touch and sight and defined in adrawing with various shading techniques. When you draw a patterned texture, you need to defineboth the pattern and the texture.Compare the two different textures on these two identical striped patterns. The texture of thepattern in the first drawing is definitely not fuzzy. However, thanks to the jagged hatching linesof various lengths and values, the second striped pattern looks furry. Hatching, a classicalshading technique, is comprised of sets of lines drawn closely together to give the illusion ofvalues. Hatching is a very fast and simple way to create both the texture and the pattern of fur.Figures 1and 2:Comparing asmooth stripedpattern with a fuzzystriped pattern You can create different values with hatching by: Varying the density (placing lines either far apart or close together) of the individual hatching lines. Varying the pressure used in holding various pencils. Using different grades of pencils, from hard to soft, to help with the different values.OUTLINING SPOTS OF DIFFERENT SHAPES AND SIZESIn this section you draw the shapes of some spots inside a rectangular drawing space. A drawingspace (sometimes called a drawing format) refers to the area of a drawing surface within aspecific perimeter, outlined by a shape of any size, such as a square, rectangle or circle. Youdon’t need to have your spots looking the same as mine. Use your imagination and make themany shapes you like. Just keep the shapes fairly simple!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  35. 35. -3-1) Use a ruler to draw a rectangle (a drawing space) in which to draw your spotted fur. Suggested sizes include 3.5 by 6 inches, or 5 by 7 inches.2) Draw a large spot of any shape in the right half of your drawing space.3) Draw a large partial spot on the far left.4) Add two more partial spots - one in the upper left and the other in the lower right corner.5) Sketch a couple of smaller spots in the lower left section.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  36. 36. -4-PLAYING WITH FURRY HATCHING LINESIn this section you experiment with making different values of a fuzzy texture.6) On some scrap paper, practice drawing some raggedy, uneven hatching lines of various lengths to represent fur.7) Continue practicing the texture of fur with hatching until you can make four different values. Use a 2H for the lightest value, an HB for the next value, a 2B for the medium value, and a 4B for the darkest value.ADDING TEXTURE TO SPOTTED FURThe base (or background) of spotted fur is drawn with mostly light values and the spots are dark. Examine this close-up view of spotted fur and consider the following helpful hints for drawing a realistic fur texture: Some hatching lines extend beyond the outlines of the shapes of the spots, to create a jagged, natural looking fur texture. The hatching lines are unevenly spaced and of many different lengths and thicknesses. The light values of the background are shaded first so the dark spots can easily be added over the lighter shading. 8) Use your kneaded eraser and gently pat the lines outlining the spots, so as to lighten them in preparation for shading.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  37. 37. -5-9) Draw a bunch of hatching lines of different lengths in all the areas without spots. Assuming a light source is shining from the left, graduate the values from light (2H and HB) on the left to medium (2B) on the right. Fur tends to be a little darker the farther away it is from the light. Graduated shading is a continuous progression of values from dark to light or from light to dark. If you have no experience with graduated shading, refer to lesson F-04 Graduated Values in the beginner section before you continue. Light source refers to the direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement of this light source affects every aspect of a drawing. The light source tells you where to draw all the light values and shadows.10) Use medium (2B) and dark (4B) hatching lines to graduate the shading of the spots from medium (on the left) to dark on the right.CHALLENGEIn this lesson you drew the background before the spots. However, you can draw spotted fur byshading either the background or the spots first. You can also draw the background and spots atthe same time. For extra practice try each of the following: Draw a section of spotted fur by shading the dark spots first, and then the light background. Draw another section of spotted fur by drawing both background and spots at the same time. Draw an animal or cartoon with spotted fur by using whichever method you prefer.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  38. 38. -6-Brenda HoddinottAs a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda utilizesdiverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, contécrayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott<BIOGRAPHYBorn in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. Shedeveloped strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning,and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as aself-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments haveemployed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal policedepartments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal CanadianMounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “ForensicArtists International”.Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing andpainting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired andtrained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brendachose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing,drawing, painting, and developing her websites.Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach tocurriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes forstudents of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels andabilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as aresource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughoutthe world.LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS Drawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  39. 39. Brenda HoddinottI-05 BEGINNER: CARTOONS & CRITTERSIn this lesson you use simple hatching lines to render the texture and pattern of striped fur. Thedrawings you complete in this lesson may not be the most exciting works of art on the planet;however, the next time you draw a zebra or other striped animal, you’ll notice how much easierthe fur is to draw, and that the animal looks a lot more realistic!This project is divided into the following two major sections: PLAYING WITH PATTERN AND TEXTURE: A simple exercise takes you step-by-step through the basic process of hatching a striped pattern with a furry texture. A combination of dark and light values and raggedy hatching lines defines fuzzy stripes. DRAWING ON YOUR OWN: FURRY STRIPES: You are challenged to enhance your observation skills while drawing an intricate striped furry texture. Simple guidelines, along with numerous step-by-step illustrations, guide you gently through the whole process.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneadedand vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. 11 PAGES – 18 ILLUSTRATIONS This project is recommended for artists of all levels and ages, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2005 (Revised 2006)
  40. 40. -2- PLAYING WITH PATTERN AND TEXTURE To capture the pattern of striped fur in a drawing, you use dark and light values. Pattern refers to the different values on the surface of your subject as identified by your sense of sight. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils. To define the furry texture, you use raggedy hatching lines. Texture is the surface detail of an object, as defined in a drawing with various shading techniques. The senses of touch and sight help identify the surface texture of drawing subject. Hatching a classical shading technique, is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion of values. When you draw fuzzy stripes, you need to define both the pattern and the texture. In this section, a simple exercise takes you step-by-step through the process of hatching a striped pattern with a furry texture. ILLUSTRATION 05-01 First of all, examine this drawing of striped fur and take note of the following:  Some hatching lines extend beyond the border of each stripe to create a jagged, natural looking transition of values.  The hatching lines are curved, unevenly spaced, and of many different lengths and thicknesses.  The transition of values between the light and dark stripes is compacted into very short distances. ILLUSTRATION 05-02 1) Lightly sketch three curved vertical lines with two horizontal straight lines that cut across them. Press lightly with a 2H pencil. The horizontal lines indicate the stripes and the three curved lines will guide you through the process of curving your hatching lines around an implied three-dimensional form. By shading the light stripes first, the dark values can easily be added over the lighter shading.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  41. 41. -3- ILLUSTRATION 05-03 2) Use 2H and/or HB pencils to add hatching lines to the first light stripe. The hatching lines follow the curves of the vertical guidelines. You can create different values with hatching by:  Varying the density (placing lines either far apart or close together) of the individual hatching lines.  Varying the pressure used in holding your pencils.  Using different grades of pencils, from hard to soft, to help with the different values. ILLUSTRATION 05-04 You need to keep your pencils freshly sharpened at all times when you draw fur. Otherwise the furry texture will not stand out well. 3) Use HB and/or 2B pencils to sketch raggedy hatching lines for the upper section of the dark stripe. Take note of how the transitional section between the dark and light values, is jagged and uneven with curved hatching lines of various lengths. Don’t forget to follow the vertical guidelines!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  42. 42. -4- ILLUSTRATION 05-05 4) With your 2B pencil, extend the dark hatching lines downward, slightly below the second horizontal line. Remember to keep all your hatching lines curved. Fur drawn with mostly straight lines tends to look very flat and unnatural. 5) Use a freshly sharpened 4B pencil to add a few very dark hatching lines across the horizontal center sections of the dark stripe. ILLUSTRATION 05-06 Touching up sections of fur that are too dark or too light is super simple! To lighten a section, mold your kneaded eraser to a thin wedge and gently pat a few of the darkest hatching lines. You can add more hatching lines in between some of the others to make a section darker. 6) Use an HB pencil to add hatching to the lower stripe. Refer to the lessons in F- LEVEL BEGINNER: HATCHING for lots more information on shading with hatching.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  43. 43. -5- DRAWING ON YOUR OWN: FURRY STRIPES In this section you are challenged to enhance your observation skills while drawing a complex striped furry texture. Instead of detailed step-by-step written instructions, you are provided with simple guidelines and tips; however, numerous step-by-step illustrations will guide you gently through the whole process. If you run into problems, simply refer to the written instructions and tips provided throughout this lesson, especially those in the previous section. ILLUSTRATION 05-07 Use a ruler to draw a square drawing format. Suggested sizes include 5 by 5 inches, 6 by 6 inches, or 7 by 7 inches. Mark off four points on the left side of the square to identify five spaces (the stripes). The points mark where light stripes meet dark ones. Two of the spaces are shorter than the other three; the one from the top side of the square down to the first point, and the one from the last point down to the bottom. The three other spaces are equal. Draw lines to mark where dark stripes meet light ones as in the next four illustrations. ILLUSTRATION 05-08 ILLUSTRATION 05-09Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  44. 44. -6- ILLUSTRATION 05-10 Before you draw the long curved lines (from left to right worked for me), mark off the points on the right side of the square, as shown in illustrations 05-10 and 05-11. Curved lines are created when a straight line curves (or bends). Curved lines can be drawn thick or thin. ILLUSTRATION 05-11 Some of the lines separating the stripes are in fact compound curves. A compound curve is created when a curved line changes direction (as in the letter "S").Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  45. 45. -7- ILLUSTRATION 05-12 Several angular lines, drawn through the stripes, serve as guidelines to help keep you stay on track as you draw hatching lines. Use your kneaded eraser and gently pat all the lines in your sketch, so as to lighten them in preparation for shading. ILLUSTRATION 05-13 A tiny section of a white stripe is added to the upper left of the drawing format. Assume a light source is shining from the left. Light source refers to the direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement of this light source affects every aspect of a drawing. The light source tells you where to draw all the light values and shadows. Hence, the overall values of the fur need to look a little darker the farther away they are from the light. In other words, the fur is a little darker toward the right.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  46. 46. -8- ILLUSTRATION 05-14 A dark stripe is added below the light one. Observe that the shading is dark on the far left, then gets lighter, and finally graduates much darker toward the upper right. A graduation is a continuous progression of graduated values from dark to light or from light to dark. ILLUSTRATION 05-15 When you draw striped fur, the transition of values from light to dark is compacted into very short distances. Remember, fur looks much more realistic when you draw the hatching lines of different lengths.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

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