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Incepatori g forme de umbrire

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    Incepatori g forme de umbrire Incepatori g forme de umbrire Document Transcript

    • COMING OUT OF THE DARK Brenda Hoddinott G-02 BEGINNER: SHADING FORMS In this lesson you draw the three-dimensional form of a sphere with a focus on light, shadows, and a cast shadow. The medium is charcoal, and erasers are the drawing tools.The technique of taking away values, rather than adding them, is very popular in art classes,especially still life and figure drawing. Many beginners love this method, because it focuses oncreating light and dark values separately, rather than rendering a full range of values all at once.This project is divided into the following two sections: DRAWING WITH ERASERS: Most artists are familiar with drawing dark values on a light surface. However, as you will soon see, you can also draw light values on a dark surface by using an eraser (or erasers). In this section, you experiment with two different types of erasers as drawing tools. COMING OUT OF THE DARK: I take you step-by-step through a drawing of a spherical form. You draw light with erasers, and shadows with pencils. In other words, you take away values rather than adding them! Form, as applied to drawing, is the illusion of the three- dimensional structure of a shape, such as a circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective.Suggested drawing supplies include a 2B or 4B charcoal stick, 2B or 4B charcoal pencil, vinyleraser, kneaded eraser, heavy white drawing or watercolor paper, and paper towels. This project is recommended for artists from age 10 to adult, as well as students of home schooling, academic, and recreational fine art educators. 7 PAGES – 7 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Drawspace.com, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2006
    • 2 DRAWING WITH ERASERS Most artists are familiar with drawing dark values on a light surface. However, as you will soon see, you can also draw light values on a dark surface by using an eraser (or erasers). Values are different shades of gray created in a drawing, by various means, such as varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding your pencils. Shading refers to the various shades of gray (values) in a drawing that make drawings look three-dimensional. In this section, you experiment with erasers as drawing tools. You need the following two different types of erasers: Vinyl eraser: works well for drawing really light areas and fine details. If the edge of your vinyl eraser gets too dull to draw properly, just cut off a new piece (about an inch long) or simply cut a small slice off the end with a very sharp blade or knife. Kneaded eraser: is great for lightening large areas. You can either pat or gently rub the surface of your paper. To draw fine detail, simply mould the tip of the eraser to a point or wedge. To clean your kneaded eraser, simply stretch and reshape (also known as “kneading”) it several times until it comes clean. ILLUSTRATION 02-01 1) Use your darkest pencil to smoothly shade in the entire area of a drawing surface. A drawing surface (also called a drawing space or drawing format) refers to the area in which you render a drawing. Mine is 6 by 3 inches. Use the side of the pencil point, instead of the tip. It’s faster and you end up with a smoother surface. 2) With a piece of paper towel or soft tissue, very gently blend the whole surface, until you have a solid tone. ILLUSTRATION 02-02 Blending is the process of rubbing shading lines with a blending tool (such as tissue or paper towel) to evenly distribute the drawing medium over the surface of the paper. Don’t apply too much pressure, or you’ll grind the graphite into the paper so much that it won’t erase (thereby defeating the whole purpose of this exercise).Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 3 ILLUSTRATION 02-03 3) Use your erasers however you wish to experiment with pulling light values from the dark drawing surface. COMING OUT OF THE DARK Time to put a twist into your notions on drawing a sphere, by pulling light values from a dark surface! In this section, I take you step-by-step through a drawing of a spherical form. Form, as applied to drawing, is the illusion of the three-dimensional structure of a shape, such as a circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective. You draw light with erasers, and shadows with pencils. You practice taking away values rather than adding them! ILLUSTRATION 02-04 1) Shade in a section of your drawing space with your stick of charcoal. Use the side of your charcoal instead of the end. It’s faster. If you are using graphite instead of charcoal, use a dark pencil such as an 8B. 2) With a piece of paper towel or soft tissue, gently rub the surface until you have a solid tone. This shaded background is your middle value. Your erasers will create the lighter values and you’ll use your charcoal pencil to shade the darker values.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 4 3) Shake the extra charcoal off your paper into the garbage. 4) Use your kneaded eraser to begin erasing or “pulling out” the light areas. Erase, pat, and pull out light areas until you can identify a circular shape. Shape refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. The light source is coming from the upper left, which affects the placement and value of every section of shading. Light source is the direction from which a dominant light originates. The lighter values closer to the light source, are near the top of the sphere. The tiny glow on the lower edge of the circle is the reflected light. Reflected light is a faint rim of light reflected or bounced back on an object from the surfaces close to and around the object, such as the surface on which the object is sitting. By the way, don’t worry if your circle looks more like a kidney! The goal of this project is to draw a three-dimensional shape. ILLUSTRATION 02-05Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 5 5) Use a sharp edge of your vinyl erase to “pull out” the white area (the highlight) in the upper area of the circle as shown. A highlight is the brightest area of an object; usually, the section that is closest to the light source. Don’t worry if it doesn’t come completely white (mine didn’t). But it should look a little whiter than the light area around it. Less light reaches the other surfaces of the sphere that are closer to or in the shadowed areas. Shadows are the areas on (or adjacent to) an object that receive little or no light. ILLUSTRATION 02-06 6) With your charcoal pencil draw an outline around your shape. This step is optional; you may prefer to leave the edges soft. You can draw this circular (or kidney shaped) outline freehand if you wish, or even use a compass to draw a circle if you are fussy picky like me. 7) Use your charcoal pencil to add dark shading to the shadow sections of the circle. The shading in the shadow area looks like a crescent shape or backwards “C” (refer to illustration 01-06). 8) Draw the cast shadow underneath the sphere. The cast shadow is on the surface, under and to the right of the sphere. The shading in a cast shadow is darker closer to the object and becomes gradually lighter toward the outer perimeter. A cast shadow is a dark area on a surface, adjacent to where the light is blocked by an object.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 6 9) Step back from your drawing, have a look at the overall values, and add final touches to the shading, if needed. By using extremes in values (more light and dark values than middle values) you create a high contrast drawing. Contrast measures the degree of difference between the light and dark values within shading. You can make some areas lighter by patting them with your kneaded eraser and others darker by adding more shading. ILLUSTRATION 02-07Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 7 Sign your name, write today’s date on the back of your drawing, and put a smile on your face! BRENDA HODDINOTT As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist (retired), and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including her favorites: graphite and paint. Brenda is the author of Drawing for Dummies (2003, Wiley Publishing, Inc., New York, NY) and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN). She is currently writing two books on classical drawing. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong drawing and painting skills through self-directed learning. During her twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, various criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. In 2003, Brenda retired from her careers as a forensic artist and teacher to work full time writing books and developing her website (Drawspace.com). This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • Brenda Hoddinott G-03 BEGINNER: SHADING FORMS In this project, you draw a silly cartoon face that looks like a big fat nose!This project is divided into the following four sections: INTRODUCTION: Drawings often appear more three-dimensional when you use a full range of values. In addition, your drawings can appear flat if you use too little contrast in values. So, a word to the wise - unless you are trying to achieve a specific mood or want the subject to look flat, always use a full range of values. OUTLINING CIRCULAR SHAPES: Find your drawing supplies and draw along with me as I take you step-by-step through the process of sketching three circular shapes. Don’t worry if your circles look more like kidneys! TRANSFORMING CIRCLES INTO SPHERES: You use contour hatching to add shading to the three spheres that define Smelly’s three-dimensional facial forms. By drawing your light values first, you can then layer your dark shading on top of your light shading. This layering creates a nice smooth transition between different values, called graduations. ADDING TWO EYES AND A MOUTH TO A NOSE: After a review of the names of the parts of an eye, you draw the two eyes above the nose and add a mouth below.Suggested drawing supplies include drawing paper, various grades of graphite pencils, kneadedand vinyl erasers, a pencil sharpener, and a sandpaper block. This article is recommended for both experienced and aspiring artists of all ages, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 11 PAGES – 27 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada, 2003 (Revised 2006)
    • 2 INTRODUCTION Drawings appear more three-dimensional when you use a full range of values. Values are the different shades of gray created in a drawing, by various means, such as varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding your pencils. In addition, your drawings can appear flat if you use too little contrast in values. Contrast measures the degree of difference between the light and dark values within shading. Shading refers to the various shades of gray (values) in a drawing that make the subjects appear three-dimensional. So, a word to the wise - unless you are trying to achieve a specific mood or want the subject to look flat, always use a full range of values. ILLUSTRATION 03-01 Examine this illustration of the final drawing and note the following:  The light source is from the upper right. Light source refers to the direction from which a dominant light originates.  From the highlight (which is usually left the white of the paper), the shading begins with very light values and then gets darker. A highlight is the brightest area of an object; usually, the section that is closest to the light source.  Medium and dark values are used in those areas that receive less light, such as those surfaces that are closer to or in the shadowed areas. OUTLINING CIRCULAR SHAPES Find your drawing supplies and draw along with me as I take you step-by-step through the process of sketching three circular shapes. ILLUSTRATION 03-02 1. With an HB pencil, lightly sketch a circle in the middle section of your drawing space. Don’t worry if your circle looks more like a kidney! The bad news is: no lesson can teach how to draw a circle. The good news is: “practice” is a fantastic teacher. As you sketch, try rotating your paper and looking at your drawing from different perspectives. This little trick often allows you insight into the problem areas. Looking at the reflection of your circle in a mirror will also help you to see areas in need of fixing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 3 ILLUSTRATION 03-03 2. Draw two smaller circles slightly below and on either side of the big circle. Observe that a portion of each of the smaller circles is drawn inside the big circle. ILLUSTRATION 03-04 3. Use your vinyl eraser to erase the sections of the small circles that are inside the big circle. Observe that the big circle now appears to be in front of (overlaps) the smaller circles. 4. Pat all your lines with your kneader eraser until you can barely see them. ILLUSTRATION 03-05 5. Add neat crisp lines to redefine your circle shapes. Use an HB or 2B pencil. You can draw these circles (or kidney shapes if you wish) freehand. However, it’s perfectly ok to use a compass or some other tool to help you draw circles. 6. Use your kneaded eraser to lighten the two curved lines that separate the three circles.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 4 ILLUSTRATION 03-06 7. Draw a curved line in the lower inside section of each of the smaller circles. If this was a nose (grin) these would be the openings of the nostrils. TRANSFORMING CIRCLES INTO SPHERES In this section, you use contour hatching to create three dimensional spheres on a two dimensional drawing surface! Many artists prefer to work from light to dark. By drawing your light values first (with your HB pencil), you can then layer your dark shading on top of your light shading (with your 4B). This layering creates a nice smooth transition between different values, called graduations. A graduation, also called graduated shading or graduated values, is a continuous progression of values, from dark to light or light to dark. The goal of graduated shading is to keep the transitions between the different values flowing smoothly into one another, as in this illustration. 8. Use various pencils and curved hatching lines, to add light, medium, and dark values (the shadow areas) to the large sphere. ILLUSTRATION 03-07 The curved hatching lines follow the curves of the circle shape. Hatching is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion of values. Note that the highlight is left the white of the paper. The shading graduates down from the highlight towards the lower right of the sphere. The values begin light (close to the highlight) and become dark and then light again close to the lower right edge of the sphere.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 5 ILLUSTRATION 03-08 The tiny rim of light at the bottom edge is called reflected light. Remember to let your pencils from light (HB) to dark (4B) do a lot of the work in drawing values. You only need to decide where to place all your values. ILLUSTRATION 03-09 9. Use the same shading technique you used for the large sphere, to shade in the smaller sphere on the right. ILLUSTRATION 03-10 Pay close attention to the shading on the lower left, which indicates the nostril. 10. Shade in the small circle on the left, in the same way as the one on the right. Refer to the two illustrations on the following page. The overall values of this circle are much darker than the other.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 6 ILLUSTRATION 03-11 11. Draw the cast shadow on the sphere on the left. Keep in mind, that a full range of values gives contrast between the light and shadow areas. The cast shadow is on the upper right surface of this small sphere. The shading in the cast shadow is darker closer to the largest sphere and becomes gradually lighter as it moves outward. ILLUSTRATION 03-12 Before you continue on to the next section, step back from your drawing and have a look at the overall values. You may need to make some areas lighter (by patting with your kneaded eraser) and others darker (by drawing more hatching lines).Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 7 ADDING TWO EYES AND A MOUTH TO A NOSE In this section you draw the two eyes above the nose and add a mouth below. Before you continue, take a couple of minutes to make sure you are familiar with these terms: 1. Upper eyelid is a movable fold of skin that opens and closes to protect the eyeball. 2. Pupil is the dark circle inside the iris, which adjusts its size to different lighting conditions. ILLUSTRATION 03-13 3. Eyelashes are fine hairs that grow from the outer edges of the upper and lower eyelids. 4. Highlight is a bright spot that defines where light bounces off the surface of the eye. 5. Iris is the colored circular shape (surrounding the pupil) of the eye. 6. White of the eye (sometimes called the eyeball) is the largest spherical section of the eye that is light in value (but not really white). ILLUSTRATION 03-14 12. Draw two oval-shapes on top of the large circle. These circular shapes represent the outlines of the eyes. Take note that the bottom edge of each oval seems to be behind the large circle. ILLUSTRATION 03-15 13. Draw a curved line above each eye to represent the eyelids. ILLUSTRATION 03-16 14. Use a curved line to complete the outline of the iris in the top section of each eye.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 8 15. Add the outline of a small circle inside each iris to represent the pupils of the eyes. 16. Draw a tiny circle inside the upper right section of each pupil (as highlights). ILLUSTRATION 03-17 ILLUSTRATION 03-18 17. Fill in the pupil of each eye with your 6B pencil. 18. Add shading to the irises. Use your HB pencil to completely fill in the iris with a middle value. Then use the point of your kneaded eraser to gently pat the shading on the side of the circle opposite the highlight until it becomes a light value. Shade in the dark areas of the irises with your 4B pencil. The darkest areas of irises are usually on the same side as the highlight. ILLUSTRATION 03-19 ILLUSTRATION 03-20 ILLUSTRATION 03-21 19. Add shading to the eyelids (HB pencil) and the whites of the eyes (2H pencil). Take note that the shading is darker on the left.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 9 ILLUSTRATION 03-22 20. Draw three eyelashes on each eye. Each eyelash curves downward from the outer edges of the eyelids, and then curls slightly upward. 21. Add a mouth, centered below the large circle and in between and below the two smaller circles. The longest curved line outlines the lower section of the upper lip, and has a smaller curved line on each end. The opening of the mouth, the curved line below the upper lip is a U-shape. The short curved line below the opening of the mouth is the bottom edge of the lower lip. ILLUSTRATION 03-23 ILLUSTRATION 03-24 ILLUSTRATION 03-25 22. Use a 6B pencil to shade in the opening of the mouth. ILLUSTRATION 03-26 23. Shade in the lower lip with an HB pencil. Leave a tiny white section (called a highlight) on the right side of the lower lip.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 10 24. Add final touches to your drawing, if needed. Pat sections that are too dark with your kneaded eraser to lighten. To make a section darker, simply draw more hatching lines in between others. ILLUSTRATION 03-27 Use your vinyl eraser to clean up any smudges or fingerprints on your drawing paper. Put today’s date on the page, sign your name and pat yourself on the back!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 11 BRENDA HODDINOTT As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist (retired), and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including her favorites: graphite and paint. Brenda is the author of Drawing for Dummies (2003, Wiley Publishing, Inc., New York, NY) and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN). She is currently writing two books on classical drawing. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong drawing and painting skills through self-directed learning. During her twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, various criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. In 2003, Brenda retired from her careers as a forensic artist and teacher to work full time writing books and developing her website (Drawspace.com). This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • Brenda Hoddinott G-04 BEGINNER: SHADING FORMS In this project, you draw a three dimensional cartoon by using contour hatching to shade the four spheres that define the forms of the head, nose and eyes.Baldy Noears may look somewhat familiar to you. He’s quite famous actually! His portrait is onthe front cover of my first book “Drawing for Dummies”. Feel free to take artistic license withyour drawing. Instead of rendering Baldy Noears exactly as he is, you can draw his cousin,parent or best friend; in other words, the circular shapes of the features can be modified tobecome ovals or even kidney-shapes.This lesson is divided into four parts: OUTLINING BALDY NOEARS: You outline a set of eyes, a nose and a mouth inside a circular shape. SHADING THE EYES, NOSE, AND MOUTH: From the highlights on the head, nose and eyes (which are left white), the shading begins with light values and then gets progressively darker. ADDING CAST SHADOWS: The shading in the cast shadows is darker closer to the spheres and becomes gradually lighter as it moves outward. SHADING BALDY’S HEAD: The curved hatching lines used for shading Baldy’s head, follow the curves of the circular shape.You need 2H (light values), HB and 2B (middle values), and 4B and 6B (dark values) pencils,good quality drawing paper, and erasers. If you plan to use regular wood pencils instead ofmechanical, you also need a pencil sharpener and a sandpaper block. This lesson is recommended for artists, aged ten to ninety-nine, who have limited drawing skills, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators 9 PAGES – 12 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – Revised 2006
    • 2 OUTLINING BALDY NOEARS This cartoon of Baldy Noears may look somewhat familiar. He’s quite famous actually! His portrait is on the front cover of my first book “Drawing for Dummies”. In this section, you outline a set of eyes, a nose and a mouth inside a circular shape. Feel free to take artistic license with your drawing. Instead of rendering Baldy Noears exactly as he is, you can draw his cousin, parent or best friend; in other words, the circular shapes of the features can be modified to become ovals or even kidney-shapes. Drawing circles freehand is an invaluable skill you eventually need to develop. The bad news is that no lesson can teach how you to draw a circle freehand. The good news is that “practice” is a fantastic teacher; in other words - you teach yourself. When drawing a circle freehand, rotating the paper and looking at your drawing from different perspectives often allows you insight into the problem areas. Looking at the circle’s reflection in a mirror will also help you to see areas in need of fixing. 1) Lightly sketch a large circular shape. Use an HB pencil. Don’t press too hard with your pencil – keep your drawing light. You may want to erase some areas later, and if your lines are really dark, this won’t be possible. My shape is a circle, but don’t worry if your circular shape is closer to an oval or kidney- shape. If you prefer a circle and become frustrated with drawing it freehand, try using a tool such as a compass to draw your circle. You can even use the rim of a glass or mug, or a small plate to outline a circle. 2) Draw a small circle inside the large circle (close to its right edge). The nose can be big or really tiny, and can even be an oval instead of a circle. ILLUSTRATION 04-01 ILLUSTRATION 04-02Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 3 ILLUSTRATION 04-03 3) Draw two smaller circles (as the eyes) slightly above the big circle. If you look closely, you’ll notice that the eye closer to the right edge of the big circle, is sketched smaller that the other. When you imagine the head as a big three dimensional sphere, you realize that the eye on the right appears to be smaller because it is farther away. 4) Add a mouth, below the large circle. The mouth in my drawing is an oval. SHADING THE EYES, NOSE, AND MOUTH Before you begin shading take a moment and examine the small version of the completed project below. Take note that the light source is from the right. Light source refers to the direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement of this light source affects every aspect of a drawing, including where you need to draw all the different values. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils. From the highlights on the head, nose and eyes (which are left white), the shading begins with light values and then gets progressively darker. A highlight is a bright spot that defines where light bounces off the surface of an object. Medium and dark values are used in those areas that receive less light, such as those surfaces that are closer to or in the shadowed areas. Shadows are the areas on an object that receive little or no light. ILLUSTRATION 04-04 The tiny rim of light at the bottom edge of the sphere is called reflected light. Reflected light is a faint rim of light reflected or bounced back on an object (especially noticeable on a sphere) from the surfaces close to and around the object, such as the surface on which the object is sitting. Contrast can be used to make your drawings more three-dimensional by using extremes in values. Contrast measures the degree of difference between the light and dark values within shading. Your drawings can appear flat if you use too little contrast in values.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 4 5) Add shading to both eyes. When shaded with a full range of values, the eyes look like three dimensional balls (spheres). Use an HB pencil for the light and medium values, and a 4B or 6B for the really dark shadow areas. ILLUSTRATION 04-05 The curved hatching lines follow the curves of the circular shapes. The shading graduates outward from the highlights (which are white) toward the lower left. The values begin light around the highlight and become dark and then light again close to the lower edge of the sphere (reflected light). ILLUSTRATION 04-06 6) Shade in the nose with curved hatching lines. Let your pencils from light (2H or HB) to dark (4B or 6B) do a lot of the work. You only need to decide where to place all your values.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 5 ILLUSTRATION 04-07 7) Add shading to the inside of the mouth. The shading graduates from light (lower left) to dark (upper right). First, lightly shade in the entire oval with an HB pencil. Then use a 4B pencil to add dark shading in the upper right section. ADDING CAST SHADOWS Cast shadows in this drawing are the dark areas on the surface of the head where the light is blocked by the eyes and nose. The shading in the cast shadows is darker closer to the spheres and becomes gradually lighter as it moves outward. The darkest values in the cast shadows are right next to the edges of the eyes and nose. ILLUSTRATION 04-08 8) Add the cast shadows of the eyes and nose. Many artists prefer to work from light to dark when drawing cast shadows. By drawing light values first (HB pencil), you can then layer your dark shading (4B pencil) on top of your light shading. This layering creates a nice smooth transition between different values, called graduations.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 6 SHADING BALDY’S HEAD Keep in mind that a full range of values gives contrast between light and shadow areas. Also, the curved hatching lines used for shading Baldy’s head, follow the curves of the circular shape. ILLUSTRATION 04-09 9) Using various light pencils (such as 2H and HB), and curved hatching lines, add light and medium values to the section of the head surrounding the face. The highlight is left the white of the paper. The values begin light and graduate darker toward the areas farther away from the highlight. ILLUSTRATION 04-10 10) Using various pencils and curved hatching lines, add medium and dark values. Also refer to the drawing on the next page. The darkest values are in the areas farther away from the highlight. Remember to leave the rim of reflected light lighter than the shadows.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 7 The small rim of light along the lower edge (reflected light) is very important for making Baldy’s head three dimensional. ILLUSTRATION 04-11 11) Step back from your drawing and have a look at the overall values. Add final touches to the shading, if needed. Refer to the final drawing on the next page. You can make areas darker by drawing more short hatching lines in between the lines you already have. If a section of shading looks too dark, (especially take note of the reflected light area), use the point of your kneaded eraser to lighten it: Pull and stretch your kneaded eraser until it becomes soft. Mold it to a point. Pat the area very slowly and gently with your kneaded eraser. 12) Use your vinyl eraser to clean up any smudges or fingerprints on your drawing paper.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 8 Put today’s date on the page, sign your name and pat yourself on the back! ILLUSTRATION 04-12Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • 9 BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
    • Getting started withBy Cindy WiderArt educator, art curricula designer, award-winning gallery-represented artist, and authorof Paint in Your PyjamasG05 BEGINNER: SHADING BASICSThis lesson is designed to introduce a beginner to several aspects of shading, from preparing andholding a pencil to creating and blending shading.This exercise is divided into four sections: HOW TO PREPARE YOUR PENCIL: Your goal is to expose as much graphite as possible while also keeping it smooth around the edges. HOW TO HOLD YOUR PENCIL: You can hold your pencil in many different ways for drawing. This section focuses on an ideal way to hold a pencil for rendering shading. HOW DIFFERENT PAPERS AFFECT SHADING: I show you how two different textures of paper produce significantly different results with shading. USING A COTTON BUD TO BLEND A SHADED AREA: Some artists prefer to blend their shading and others don’t. Before you rule out blending, give it a try! Blending is ideal for adding final touches to an already successfully shaded picture.Supplies needed include: HB, 2B, and 4B pencils, smooth and rough drawing papers, pencilsharpener, eraser and fine sandpaper or a sandpaper block. 5 PAGES – 5 ILLUSTRATIONS This lesson is recommended for artists of all ages and skill levels, as well as students of home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Publishing for Drawspace.com, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2008
    • -2- HOW TO PREPARE YOUR PENCIL Your goal is to expose as much graphite as possible, then ARTSPEAK smooth out any rough or jagged edges on the newly Technique refers to a well- exposed graphite to prevent scratches streaking through defined procedure, such as a your shaded areas. particular way of rendering shading, used to accomplish a 1. Sharpen an HB pencil, exposing as much specific task. graphite as possible without it breaking. Quite often, more than one 2. Place the graphite section of your pencil almost technique is suitable for successfully completing a task; flat onto a piece of smooth sandpaper (Figure hence, the artist’s selection of a 801) technique is generally based on individual preferences and 3. Lift the pencil on a slight angle just enough so personal style. that the wood part doesn’t scrape along the surface of the sandpaper. Shading (verb) refers to the technique used to achieve a 4. Gently roll your pencil across the sandpaper, smooth rendering of graphite dragging it along as you go. pencil evenly distributed over the surface of the page or 5. Avoid flat edges by rolling it a full 360 degrees as surface you are working on. you drag. Graphite is a soft black form of opaque carbon found in nature, often mixed with clay in the CHALLENGE manufacture of graphite pencils. Figure 801: How to prepare a Using the same pencil for shading process, prepare a 2B and 4B pencil for shading. HOW TO HOLD YOUR PENCIL You can hold your pencil in many different ways. However, for the purpose of this exercise, try the following: 1. Hold an HB pencil as flat to the page as possible without allowing the wood part to touch the surface (Figure 802). If the wood is touching the paper, or the pencil is not flat to the paper’s surface, you may end up with scratches and inconsistent shading.Copyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com
    • -3- Notice the way the back end of the pencil is securely tucked inside the hand and a pinch- grip is made on the post of the pencil. This way of holding the pencil enables the flat edge of your hand to remain resting on your page as you move your pencil back and forth across the surface. 2. As you hold your pencil as flat to the page as possible, gently stroke it from side to side. Make sure you move your entire arm. You may notice the skin wobble on the underside of your arm and your wrist should be stiff (unless you are working in a very small area.) When working in very small areas you can use tiny circular motions. There should be no evidence of these circles left behind whilst using these fine shading techniques. 3. Begin with minimal pressure and gradually apply more pressure to create darker areas. Build up your shaded area in a series of layers rather than pressing too hard right away. You should see no evidence of lines, circles or the direction of the shaded stroke – just a mass of shaded tone. CHALLENGE Using the same process, create a section of shading with 2B and 4B pencils. Figure 802: How to hold your pencil for shading ARTSPEAK HOW DIFFERENT PAPERS AFFECT SHADING Tones (also called values) are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying Different textures of paper will produce the pressure used in holding various grades of significantly different results with pencils. shading. The rougher the paper is, the more of the white of page shows through Grade refers to the softness or hardness of the in tiny speckled-patches. Medium and mixture used in the manufacture of graphite and smooth textured papers will show less of other drawing media. the white page.Copyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com
    • -4- Examine shading on the following two different types of paper. Try your hand at shading on both a smooth and rough paper. Figure 803: Results of shading on medium texture drawing paper. Figure 804: Results of shading on smooth water-colour paper. USING A COTTON BUD TO BLEND A SHADED AREA Some artists prefer to blend their shading and others don’t. Before you rule out blending, give it a try! Blending is ideal for adding final touches to an already successfully shaded picture. You can use a variety of objects to blend a shaded area such as; a paper stump, a small piece of leather, chamois or even a tissue. A cotton bud (also called a cotton ball) is also a useful TIP! instrument for blending shading. Blending is not a Use small circular motions for smaller areas and a reparative technique for combination of long sweeping vertical or horizontal lines poorly rendered shading, as well as diagonals or circular motions for larger areas. and should not be used to try and cover up mistakes. Be careful not to over-work the surface, as it can tear or be spoilt in some way. Be careful to retain your areas of tone. Figure 805: Results of shading on smooth water-colour paper that has been blended with a cotton bud. TIP! Never use your finger to blend with as it contains oils that will repel any extra pencil you wish to put down, as well as leaving a greasy imprint.Copyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com
    • -5- Drawspace.com is proud to introduce Cindy Wider Art educator, art curricula designer, award-winning gallery- represented artist, and author of Paint in Your Pyjamas Cindy Wider currently resides in Noosa on the Sunshine Coast of Queensland, Australia with her husband Stuart, and daughters Isha and Sumaya. Art philosophy I believe that almost everyone has the natural gifts needed for learning to draw and paint, and that art has the ability to heal and help us to reach our full human potential. Art is the missing language that can bridge the gap in communication when words are not enough. It is my life purpose to share my love of art, through inspiring and motivating others to realize their natural gifts for drawing and painting. My passion for helping others to learn to draw and paint comes from the joy and excitement I experience through the process of creating art and my desire to share that feeling! I stumbled upon my natural gifts for art at the age of 23years and wished I had known about it sooner. Professional accomplishments After ten years of serious art study Cindy went on to become one of her community’s leading artists with her artworks gracing the walls of many of the major hotels, corporate boardrooms and private homes as well as selling overseas. She began tutoring at the local Technical and Further Education College in 1988 and then went on to establish the largest on-going private art tuition school in Port Lincoln, then several years later in Noosa Queensland. For many years Cindy worked as a part time freelance illustrator for the internationally renowned rubber stamp company, ‘Annaleey crafts.’ In 2005, along with her husband Stuart she was commissioned by the Microsoft Corporation to produce an original artwork for their Sydney headquarters, and limited edition prints for the annual corporate gift to their business associates. You can view Cindy’s paintings at: http://www.thecoopergallery.com.au/wider/wider.htm Paint in Your Pyjamas Have you been asking yourself, "Who am I and what do I really want out of life?” Perhaps youve been selflessly dedicating all your energy to your children or partner to help them fulfill their dreams and goals. Maybe youre working hard just to earn a living. But now you feel the time has come to do something for yourself. If so, this book is just for you... You can buy Cindy’s soft-cover book or e-book version, ‘Paint in Your Pyjamas – every Woman’s guide to finding your life purpose through art’ at: http://www.paintinyourpyjamas.comCopyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com
    • Creating a By Cindy Wider Art educator, art curricula designer, award-winning gallery-represented artist, and author of Paint in Your PyjamasG06 BEGINNER: CREATING A VALUE SCALEMost drawing subjects can be rendered to appear three-dimensional with TIP!only five values plus white. This simple lesson takes you through the Refer toprocess of successfully creating a value scale with three grades of pencils. Lesson G05This lesson is divided into two sections: Beginner: WARMING UP FOR SHADING: The supplies needed for this Getting exercise are listed. You assemble your drawing supplies, prepare Started with three pencils for shading, and practice shading with each. Shading before you PRODUCING A VALUE SCALE: You create a six-tone value begin this scale with HB, 2B, and 4B pencils by referring to step-by-step lesson. illustrated instructions. 5 PAGES – 8 ILLUSTRATIONS This lesson is recommended for artists of all ages and skill levels, as well as students of home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Publishing for Drawspace.com, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2008
    • -2- WARMING UP FOR SHADING TIP! ARTSPEAK In this section, you assemble your drawing supplies, Refer to Lesson Shading (noun) prepare three pencils for shading, and practice G05 Beginner: refers to the shading with each. You need the following supplies Getting Started various values (or reasonable substitutes): with Shading within a drawing Pencil sharpener before you that make Hard plastic (or vinyl) eraser begin this images appear lesson. three- Putty (or kneaded) eraser dimensional; HB, 2B and 4B grades of graphite pencils (verb) the Fine grade sandpaper or sandpaper block process of adding values to Soft, dry, and clean mopping brush for clearing away eraser crumbs a drawing so as Glad bake or scrap paper (to place under hand and protect your to create the drawing surface from smudges) illusion of texture, form Inexpensive A4 bond paper (or printer paper) for practicing shading and/or three- Good quality drawing paper for shading the value scale dimensional Ruler (clear plastic – not colored) space. Figure 601 Graphite is a 1) Prepare HB, 2B and 4B pencils soft black form for shading (Figure 601). of opaque carbon found in Refer to Lesson G05 Beginner: nature, often Getting Started with Shading. mixed with clay in the 2) Use scrap paper to practice small manufacture of sections of shading with each graphite pencils. pencil. Tones (also Hold your pencil as in Figure 602. called values) It may feel a little awkward at first are the different but do persist as it will give you shades of gray the best effect when held this way. created when you draw by When you are shading, your goal is not to see any pencil lines in your varying the work. If you do, your pencil is probably held too high on an angle. pressure used in holding Keep your Figure 602 various grades pencil as of pencils. flat to the page as Grade refers to possible the softness or (without hardness of the scratching mixture used in the manufacture it with the of graphite and wood other drawing part.) media.Copyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com
    • -3- PRODUCING A VALUE SCALE In this section, you create a six-tone value scale. As you draw, constantly refer to the completed value scale in Figure 603. Better still, print this page, cut out the value scale, and tape it to the top or bottom of your drawing space before you begin. As you work, you can constantly compare your tones to this value scale. Figure 603 3) Using your ruler and HB pencil, draw a rectangle 12cm long by 2cm wide. Divide this rectangle into 2cm squares and place numbers from 6 to 1 underneath, just like the diagram above (but without the shading). The numbers indicate the level of tone. 4) Begin shading these squares by using the example below as a guide. Use a soft touch to achieve a level 2 tone in all of the boxes apart from the level 1 box, which is left blank. When working in very small areas you can use tiny circular motions. However, be careful not to leave evidence of these circles behind. Figure 604 5) Using your 2B pencil, press a little firmer this time and begin in box number 6. Gradually shade all the way through the boxes until you complete box number 3. Leave box number 2 untouched as the level 2 tone. You should see no evidence of lines, circles or the direction of the shaded stroke – just a mass of shaded tone. Figure 605Copyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com
    • -4- 6) Using your 2B pencil again, pressing even firmer, shade all the boxes, beginning with number 6, until you complete box 4. Leave box 3 untouched as the level 3 tone. Figure 606 7) Press firmly with your 4B pencil, to shade the remaining two boxes (6 and 5) leaving 4 untouched. Figure 607 8) Using your 4B pencil, pressing quite firmly, shade in the number 6 box. Your value scale of six tones is now complete. Figure 608 9) When you are done, use your TIP! vinyl and putty Each time you begin the shading on one of your drawings, draw a erasers to clean small value scale at the top or bottom of your drawing space. up around the This value scale can help you compare different levels of light edges. and dark whilst you are shading your artwork.Copyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com
    • -5- Drawspace.com is proud to introduce Cindy Wider Art educator, art curricula designer, award-winning gallery- represented artist, and author of Paint in Your Pyjamas Cindy Wider currently resides in Noosa on the Sunshine Coast of Queensland, Australia with her husband Stuart, and daughters Isha and Sumaya. Art philosophy I believe that almost everyone has the natural gifts needed for learning to draw and paint, and that art has the ability to heal and help us to reach our full human potential. Art is the missing language that can bridge the gap in communication when words are not enough. It is my life purpose to share my love of art, through inspiring and motivating others to realize their natural gifts for drawing and painting. My passion for helping others to learn to draw and paint comes from the joy and excitement I experience through the process of creating art and my desire to share that feeling! I stumbled upon my natural gifts for art at the age of 23years and wished I had known about it sooner. Professional accomplishments After ten years of serious art study Cindy went on to become one of her community’s leading artists with her artworks gracing the walls of many of the major hotels, corporate boardrooms and private homes as well as selling overseas. She began tutoring at the local Technical and Further Education College in 1988 and then went on to establish the largest on-going private art tuition school in Port Lincoln, then several years later in Noosa Queensland. For many years Cindy worked as a part time freelance illustrator for the internationally renowned rubber stamp company, ‘Annaleey crafts.’ In 2005, along with her husband Stuart she was commissioned by the Microsoft Corporation to produce an original artwork for their Sydney headquarters, and limited edition prints for the annual corporate gift to their business associates. You can view Cindy’s paintings at: http://www.thecoopergallery.com.au/wider/wider.htm Paint in Your Pyjamas Have you been asking yourself, "Who am I and what do I really want out of life?” Perhaps youve been selflessly dedicating all your energy to your children or partner to help them fulfill their dreams and goals. Maybe youre working hard just to earn a living. But now you feel the time has come to do something for yourself. If so, this book is just for you... You can buy Cindy’s book, ‘Paint in Your Pyjamas – every Woman’s guide to finding your life purpose through art’ at: http://www.paintinyourpyjamas.com/Copyright to all intellectual property, articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this document belong to Cindy Wider and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposeswhatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider. Copyright to this lesson in its current format belongs to Hoddinott Publishing, and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Cindy Wider (E-mail cindy@stuartcindy.com) and Brenda Hoddinott (E-mail brenda@drawspace.com) Web site http://www.drawspace.com