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Self                                                 Port rait                                                 Brenda Hodd...
THREE FAMILIES OF                                     Brenda Hoddinott                          C-02 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH L...
2   THREE FAMILIES OF LINES   Lines visually separate and/or define the forms, shapes, and patterns of the various compone...
3   CURVED LINES   Curved lines are formed when a straight line curves or bends (as in the letters "C" and "U"). A   compo...
4                                                       WORKSHEET ONECopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, le...
5                                                       WORKSHEET TWOCopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, le...
6                                                     WORKSHEET THREECopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, le...
7                                                      WORKSHEET FOURCopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, le...
8   BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY   As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrato...
THE KOALA                                     Brenda Hoddinott                           C-03 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINESThi...
-2-   OUTLINING KAYLA’S PROPORTIONS   In this section, your goal is to lightly sketch Kayla’s head, face, and ears on your...
-3-   3.      Sketch two small circles, approximately halfway between the top and bottom of her           head, to mark th...
-4-   5.      Sketch a vertical oval shape, as her nose, extending from the space between the eyes           down to the c...
-5-                       ILLUSTRATION 03-06                                                                         Look ...
-6-   7.      Use your kneaded eraser to pat your sketch lines until they are so light that you can           barely see t...
-7-                         ILLUSTRATION 03-12                                                                            ...
-8-   OUTLINING A KOALA’S FACE   In this section, you outline Kayla’s eyes, nose, and mouth with nice neat lines. Keep you...
-9-                                                                       ILLUSTRATION 03-16   13.     Use your 2B        ...
- 10 -   17.     Use a 4B or 6B pencil to fill in the circular sections of the eyes.           Leave the highlights and th...
- 11 -   BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY   As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illus...
THE LION            Brenda Hoddinott  C-05 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINESThis project offers simple step-by-step illustratedins...
-2-    PUTTING PROPER PROPORTIONS ON PAPER    In this section, your goal is to sketch Linus’s head, ears, and facial featu...
-3-                               ILLUSTRATION 02-03                                                                      ...
-4-                                ILLUSTRATION 02-05                                                                     ...
-5-    9.     Pat your entire drawing with a kneaded eraser, until all your sketch lines become so           light that yo...
-6-                                                                 ILLUSTRATION 02-08    12.    Outline Linus’s head, fac...
-7-                                                                                 ILLUSTRATION 02-09    13.    Outline t...
-8-    17.    Outline a small oval shape on the upper left of the nose, as the highlight.    18.    Add shading to the nos...
-9-                                                                 ILLUSTRATION 02-12    20.    Use a 2B pencil to       ...
- 10 -                                                      ILLUSTRATION 02-13Copyright to all articles, images, text, pro...
- 11 -    BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY    As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and ill...
Brenda Hoddinott                                        C-06 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINES                                    ...
-2-   SETTING UP PROPORTIONAL GUIDELINES   In this section, I take you step by step through the process of setting up prop...
-3-                         ILLUSTRATION 06-03                                                                            ...
-4-                            ILLUSTRATION 06-05                                                                         ...
-5-                Before you attempt to draw eyes, you need to be familiar with the names of   each part. The same names ...
-6-                           ILLUSTRATION 06-08                                                                          ...
-7-                         ILLUSTRATION 06-10                                                                            ...
-8-                         ILLUSTRATION 06-12                                                                            ...
-9-   19.       Sketch the strands of hair around the perimeter of her head.                                              ...
- 10 -                                                                   ILLUSTRATION 06-16   21.       Erase all remainin...
- 11 -                 If you are working in pencil, you may need to re-sharpen your pencil several   times as your work t...
- 12 -                                                             ILLUSTRATION 06-18   25.       Outline the             ...
- 13 -   26.       Outline Bitty’s irises, pupils, highlights, eyebrows, nose, and mouth.                                 ...
- 14 -   28.       Add some curved lines to the outer edges of her eyes to represent eyelashes.             When you are d...
- 15 -   30.       Fill in the upper left section of each iris around the highlight.             This dark section helps m...
- 16 -   32.       Add a dark line along the lower eyelid with a few tiny lashes on the outer ends.   33.       Pat yourse...
- 17 -   BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY   As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illus...
Brenda Hoddinott                                                C-07 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINES                            ...
-2-   INTRODUCTION   While Mangas originated in Japan, today these comic books, based on a unique genre of   cartooning, a...
-3-   SETTING UP FACIAL PROPORTIONS   In this section, simple guidelines show you how to place Kira’s features on her face...
-4-   4.      Measure the distance from the top of the head to the chin along your line of           symmetry.   5.      D...
-5-   SKETCHING KIRA’S FACE AND HAIR   It’s now time to use the proportional guidelines to begin sketching Kira’s facial f...
-6-                     ILLUSTRATION 07-07                                                                      12.     Sk...
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
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Incepatori c desenati cu linii
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Incepatori c desenati cu linii
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Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
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Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
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Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
Incepatori c desenati cu linii
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Transcript of "Incepatori c desenati cu linii"

  1. 1. Self Port rait Brenda Hoddinott C01 Beginner: Draw with Lines Document your current drawing skills by drawing yourself. Supplies: paper, erasers, a 2B pencil, and a mirror1. Gather your supplies and set yourself up in front of a mirror (or bring a small mirror to the place where you draw). Set yourself up so you can clearly see your reflection in the mirror.2. Draw a portrait of yourself as realistically as possible. This lesson is meant to document your current skills, so don’t worry if your drawing isn’t perfect. Just do your best!3. When you’re finished, sign your name and write the date on the back of your drawing. Put your drawing away in a safe place, and give yourself a big bear hug! Recommended for traditional and digital artists of all ages, as well as students of home schooling, academic, and recreational fine art educators Published by Drawspace Publishing, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2011
  2. 2. THREE FAMILIES OF Brenda Hoddinott C-02 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINESLines visually separate and/or define the forms, shapes, and patterns of the various componentsof a drawing. This lesson illustrates and demonstrates how to identify and draw the three familiesof lines, straight, angle, and curved, which are the basic building blocks of drawing.Four worksheets offer a total of sixteen fun exercises designed to help you incorporate variouscombinations of different lines and shapes into drawings. Shapes are the outward contours oroutlines of forms or figures. Basic shapes include circles, ovals, squares, and rectangles.You need an HB or 2B pencil, a vinyl eraser, and drawing paper. This project is recommended for artists and aspiring artists of all ages, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 8 PAGES – 3 ILLUSTRATIONS – 4 WORKSHEETS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada, Revised 2006
  3. 3. 2 THREE FAMILIES OF LINES Lines visually separate and/or define the forms, shapes, and patterns of the various components of a drawing. Straight, angle, and curved lines are the basic building blocks of drawing. STRAIGHT LINES Straight lines can be thick or thin, long or short, and can be drawn in any direction. The basic types of straight lines include: Vertical lines are straight up and down and at a right angle to a level surface. Horizontal lines are at a right angle to vertical lines, and are parallel to a level surface. Diagonal lines are neither vertical nor horizontal, but rather, slant at various angles. 1) Find examples of each in the next drawing. 2) Practice drawing straight lines (without a ruler) any way you find comfortable. ILLUSTRATION 02-01 ANGLE LINES Angle lines occur when two straight lines meet (or join together), and are used to draw various straight-sided shapes, such as squares, rectangles, and triangles. The sizes of the angles ultimately determine the shapes of the objects you are drawing. 3) Practice drawing various angle lines as in the following drawing. ILLUSTRATION 02-02Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. 4. 3 CURVED LINES Curved lines are formed when a straight line curves or bends (as in the letters "C" and "U"). A compound curve is created when a curved line changes direction (as in the letter S). 4) Examine the different shapes and sizes of curved lines in the next drawing. 5) Draw as many different curved lines as you possibly can. ILLUSTRATION 02-03 FAMILIES OF LINES - WORKSHEETS In the following four worksheets with four exercises on each, you complete a total of sixteen fun lessons designed to help you identify and draw various lines and shapes. Shapes are the outward contours or outlines of forms or figures. Basic shapes include circles, ovals, squares, and rectangles. Before you begin each exercise, take some time to look closely at the lines and shapes in each box while referring to the following: Can you find any straight lines? Are the straight lines vertical, horizontal, or angular? Can you find any places where straight lines meet to form angle lines? Are the spaces inside the angles big or small? Look for curved lines. If lines are curved, in what direction do they curve? Do you see any curved lines that change direction to make compound curves, such as in the letter “S”? Examine the sizes and shapes of the spaces on either side of each line. Study the outlines of shapes, such as circles, ovals, rectangles, triangles, or squares. 6) Find your drawing supplies and get started. You can do your drawings in the spaces provided below each of the following.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. 5. 4 WORKSHEET ONECopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. 6. 5 WORKSHEET TWOCopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  7. 7. 6 WORKSHEET THREECopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  8. 8. 7 WORKSHEET FOURCopyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  9. 9. 8 BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  10. 10. THE KOALA Brenda Hoddinott C-03 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINESThis project is designed to help improve your skills at seeing and drawing lines – especiallyfuzzy lines, which are the foundation for drawing animals with fur.This project is divided into the following three sections: OUTLINING KAYLA’S PROPORTIONS: In this section, your goal is to sketch Kayla’s head, face, and ears on your drawing paper proportionately correct. HATCHING FUZZY OUTLINES: Fuzzy lines are used to outline almost all furry animals. What I call a “fuzzy line” is actually a grouping of short curved lines. When you look at most drawings (especially contour drawings) of fur-coated animals, the perimeter appears to be one raggedy line. However, when you look closely, you can see that the edges of the fur are made up of tons of lines that are curving in various directions, ragged, uneven, and of various lengths and thicknesses. OUTLINING A KOALA’S FACE: In this section, you outline Kayla’s eyes, nose, and mouth with nice neat lines.Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneadedand vinyl erasers and a pencil sharpener 11 PAGES – 18 ILLUSTRATIONSThis project is recommended for artists from age 8 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – Revised 2006
  11. 11. -2- OUTLINING KAYLA’S PROPORTIONS In this section, your goal is to lightly sketch Kayla’s head, face, and ears on your drawing paper proportionately correct. A sketch is a quickly rendered drawing that illustrates the basic elements of your subject with very few details. Proportion refers to the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. Pay close attention to the lengths and curves of the various lines which outline the different parts of Kayla. Use an HB pencil, and keep your lines very light so they can be easily erased. ILLUSTRATION 03-01 When drawing an oval or a circle, rotate your paper and look at your shape from different perspectives. Examine its reflection in a mirror to help locate problem areas. 1. Draw a circular-shape to represent Kayla’s head. Leave space on either side for her big fuzzy ears. Shapes are the outward contours or outlines of forms or figures. Basic shapes include circles, ovals, squares, or rectangles. ILLUSTRATION 03-02 2. Sketch a partial circle on each side of her head to mark the locations of her ears. Remember; don’t press too hard with your pencils!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  12. 12. -3- 3. Sketch two small circles, approximately halfway between the top and bottom of her head, to mark the locations of her eyes. ILLUSTRATION 03-03 4. Sketch a circle close to the bottom of her face to mark her snout. ILLUSTRATION 03-04Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  13. 13. -4- 5. Sketch a vertical oval shape, as her nose, extending from the space between the eyes down to the center of the circle that is the snout. Note that the oval (the nose) cuts into the snout. 6. Compare your drawing to mine and fix any areas you’re not happy with. Double check the various spaces, and the lengths and curves of the various lines, which outline the different parts of the sketch. ILLUSTRATION 03-05 HATCHING FUZZY OUTLINES Fuzzy lines are used to outline almost all furry animals. What I call a “fuzzy line” is actually a grouping of several lines of different lengths. Yet, when you look at most drawings (especially outline or contour drawings) of animals, the perimeter appears to be one raggedy line. A contour drawing is a drawing comprised of lines that follow the contours of the edges of various components of a subject and define the outlines of its forms. A quickly sketched contour drawing captures a seated figure and his clothing. The illustrations on the next page show how the edges of fur are actually made up of tons of lines that curve in various directions, and are ragged, uneven, and of assorted lengths and thicknesses.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  14. 14. -5- ILLUSTRATION 03-06 Look at this contour drawing of a dog. Then examine close-up views of the lines that make up the outlines. ILLUSTRATION 03-07 ILLUSTRATION 03-08 ILLUSTRATION 03-09Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  15. 15. -6- 7. Use your kneaded eraser to pat your sketch lines until they are so light that you can barely see them. You can clean your kneaded eraser by stretching and reshaping (also known as “kneading”) it several times until it comes clean. 8. Outline Kayla’s head with short fuzzy hatching lines. As you render each section of fur, watch very closely the different directions in which the lines are drawn. Take your time. ILLUSTRATION 03-10 ILLUSTRATION 03-11Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  16. 16. -7- ILLUSTRATION 03-12 9. Use both long and short fuzzy lines to outline her ears. Take note that the lines are longer along the lower edges of the ears. Longer lines indicate that the fur is longer in these sections. Always place a piece of clean paper under your hand as you draw. Each time you work on a new section, remember to move your paper so it’s always under your hand. This prevents you from smudging your drawing, and protects the paper from the oils in your skin. ILLUSTRATION 03-13Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  17. 17. -8- OUTLINING A KOALA’S FACE In this section, you outline Kayla’s eyes, nose, and mouth with nice neat lines. Keep your pencils sharpened so your lines stay crisp and thin. ILLUSTRATION 03-14 10. Use a freshly sharpened 2B pencil to outline the eyes with neat lines. 11. Draw a tiny circle in the upper left section of each eye, as the highlights. A highlight is the brightest area of an eye where light bounces off its surface. 12. Add a small curved line to the lower inside section of each eye to complete their almond shapes. ILLUSTRATION 03-15Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  18. 18. -9- ILLUSTRATION 03-16 13. Use your 2B pencil to outline the nose. Take note that the nose is wider at the bottom. Also, the lower part is not as rounded as the top section. 14. Add two small comma shapes as Kayla’s nostrils. 15. Outline Kayla’s muzzle as two separate sections, with the top section wider. Take note that the lower section is a simple U-shape. 16. Fill in a small dark section (where the two sections meet) as her mouth. ILLUSTRATION 03-17Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  19. 19. - 10 - 17. Use a 4B or 6B pencil to fill in the circular sections of the eyes. Leave the highlights and the tiny inner section white, to help make the eyes look more realistic and shiny. 18. Erase any sketch lines, fingerprints, or smudges with your kneaded eraser molded to a point (or you can use a sharp edge of your vinyl eraser). ILLUSTRATION 03-18 If you wish you can try drawing some fur on her face and ears. When you are happy with your drawing, sign your name and put today’s date on the back.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  20. 20. - 11 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  21. 21. THE LION Brenda Hoddinott C-05 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINESThis project offers simple step-by-step illustratedinstructions, to guide you through the basicprocess of combining various lines to create acartoon of Linus the Lion.You exercise your observation skills by using a line ofsymmetry to help you draw both sides of the lion the same.There’s a method to my madness in having you draw cartoons of animals. First of all, your brainwon’t get stuck telling you something is anatomically wrong, because cartoons are not supposedto look real! Secondly, cartoons are fun to draw!This project is divided into the following parts: PUTTING PROPER PROPORTIONS ON PAPER: In this section, your goal is to sketch Linus’s head, ears, and facial features on your drawing paper proportionately correct while using a line of symmetry as a guideline. OUTLINING LINUS THE LION WITH LINES: In this section, you outline Linus with thin neat lines. Keep your pencils sharpened so your lines stay crisp and thin.For this project you need good quality white drawing paper, different grades of graphite pencils(such as 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B), kneaded and vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. This project is recommended for artists of all ages, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 11 PAGES – 13 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – Revised 2006
  22. 22. -2- PUTTING PROPER PROPORTIONS ON PAPER In this section, your goal is to sketch Linus’s head, ears, and facial features on your drawing paper proportionately correct, while using a line of symmetry as a guideline. Proportion refers to the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. Symmetry refers to a balanced arrangement (sometimes called a mirror image) of lines and/or shapes on opposite sides of an often-imaginary centerline. Shapes are the outward contours or outlines of forms or figures. 1. Turn your drawing paper to a vertical format (also referred to as a portrait format). 2. Use a 2H or HB pencil to lightly sketch a vertical line down the center of your paper. This line is called a line of symmetry. Keep the line very light! Do not press on your pencil – just the weight of the pencil will make a nice faint line. ILLUSTRATION 02-01 3. Use an HB pencil to sketch an egg-shape (Linus’s head) close to the center of your drawing space. Your goal is to draw one half of Linus on each side of the line of symmetry – each a mirror image of the other. As you draw, rotate your paper and look at both sides of your egg-shape from different perspectives. Leave lots of space above, below, and on either side for Linus’s big mane. ILLUSTRATION 02-02 4. Lightly sketch a partial circle on each side of the upper section of his head to mark his ears. Pay close attention to the lengths, angles, and curves of the various lines which outline his different parts. Examine the reflection of your drawing in a mirror to help locate problem areas. Remember to keep your lines very light!Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  23. 23. -3- ILLUSTRATION 02-03 5. Sketch two curved lines below his head as the upper section of his muzzle. Note that these two lines meet in the center, at the same point on the line of symmetry. Lions live in a family group called a pride, which usually includes at least one male, as well as several females (called lionesses), and their babies (referred to as cubs). ILLUSTRATION 02-04 6. Add a wide U-shape below the upper muzzle section as his jaw (also called the lower muzzle or chin). Lionesses work together with other female lions to hunt for food. Fashionable footwear for hunting adventures includes sneakers – but not like those of humans! Lionesses have rubbery pads on the bottoms of their feet, which allow them to quietly sneak up on their prey, by softening the sounds of their footsteps.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  24. 24. -4- ILLUSTRATION 02-05 7. Sketch two circles as his eyes. The eyes are the same size and the same distance from the line of symmetry. Feel free to measure the distances with a ruler if you want to be really precise. Despite stories to the contrary, lions are not the kings of the jungle. In fact, lions are rarely found in jungles – rather, they live in the savannas and grassy plains of Africa. ILLUSTRATION 02-06 8. Sketch Linus’s nose by using the line of symmetry to visually measure the spaces, distances, sizes and shapes. Remember; don’t press too hard with your pencils! While commonly called the king of the beasts, a lion actually has several enemies, including elephants, water buffalos, and packs of hyenas.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  25. 25. -5- 9. Pat your entire drawing with a kneaded eraser, until all your sketch lines become so light that you can barely see them. 10. Mark an X on the line of symmetry between the eyes. 11. Neatly sketch lots of lines outward from the perimeter of Linus’s head as the mane. ILLUSTRATION 02-07 The lines of the mane are unevenly spaced and of various lengths. Use the X as the center point from which each line originates. Sketching straight lines is a lot more fun when you don’t have to depend on a ruler. With practice you can teach yourself how to sketch straight line freehand. 1. Draw a dot at the place where you want your straight line to begin and another where you want it to end. 2. Before you draw, imagine the straight line connecting these two dots. 3. Connect the dots with a straight line! Draw the straight line in between the dots with one continuous movement rather than a series of stroking movements. OUTLINING LINUS THE LION WITH LINES In this section, you outline Linus with thin neat lines. Keep your pencils sharpened so your lines stay crisp and thin.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  26. 26. -6- ILLUSTRATION 02-08 12. Outline Linus’s head, face, and ears with freshly sharpened 2B pencils. Keep your pencil sharpener and sandpaper block handy so your lines stay thin and crisp. The number of lions living in the wilds of Africa is steadily decreasing. As the populations of African peoples increase, they take over more grasslands as their homes. Subsequently the natural habitats of the African animals become smaller.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  27. 27. -7- ILLUSTRATION 02-09 13. Outline the perimeter of each eye with a freshly sharpened 2B pencil. 14. Outline a tiny circle in the upper left of each eye as a highlight. A highlight is the brightest area where light bounces off the surface of an object. By leaving the highlight white, the eye will look shiny. 15. Use a 4B pencil to add shading to Linus’s eyes. Shading refers to the process of adding values to a drawing so as to create the illusion of form and/or three-dimensional spaces. Values are the different shades of gray created in a drawing by various means, such as using different grades of pencils, varying the density of the shading lines and/or the pressure used in holding a pencil. Refer to Illustrations 02-09 and 02-10. 16. Use your kneaded eraser molded to a point, to lighten a tiny section of shading in the lower right of each eye. ILLUSTRATION 02-10Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  28. 28. -8- 17. Outline a small oval shape on the upper left of the nose, as the highlight. 18. Add shading to the nose, except the highlight, with a 4B pencil. 19. Sketch a few small dots on each side of his muzzle to mark his whiskers. ILLUSTRATION 02-11Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  29. 29. -9- ILLUSTRATION 02-12 20. Use a 2B pencil to make the lines of the mane crisp and neat. 21. Draw another straight line in between each line that marks the lion’s mane. For a more interesting drawing, make these lines various lengths – long, medium, and short! 22. Complete the drawing by adding more straight lines to what appears to be the section of his mane behind his ears. Erase any sketch lines, fingerprints, or smudges with your kneaded eraser molded to a point (or a sharp edge of your vinyl eraser), sign your name, and put today’s date on the back of your drawing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  30. 30. - 10 - ILLUSTRATION 02-13Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  31. 31. - 11 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 2792, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 2794, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 2798, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (0203): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (0204): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 0204, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  32. 32. Brenda Hoddinott C-06 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINES In this project, you set up proportional guidelines, and then draw the adorable facial features and hair of a young anime child named Bitty. Suggested drawing supplies include drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneaded and vinyl erasers, a pencil sharpener, a sandpaper block, a ruler, and a fine tip black marker (optional)Manga comic books, based on a unique genre of cartooning, are popular with artists of all agesall around the world! The eyes of anime characters generally appear very large, and are the mostexpressive part of the face. The nose and mouth tend to be drawn small and simple so as tofurther emphasize the powerful expressions of the eyes and the facial area around the eyes.This lesson is divided into the following four sections: SETTING UP PROPORTIONAL GUIDELINES: I take you step by step through the process of setting up proportional guidelines for a frontal view of a young anime cartoon. SKETCHING THE FACIAL FEATURES, EARS, AND HAIR: The proportional guidelines help identify the placement of every aspect of a frontal view of a baby anime’s face and head. OUTLINING BITTY’S HAIR, FACE, AND EARS The crisp neat lines of the manga style will replace your original sketch lines. Your outline can be drawn with either pencil or a very fine tip black marker. DRAWING THE DETAILS OF THE EYES AND FACE The faces of very young anime cartoon characters are similar to human children. In this section, simple guidelines show you how to draw Bitty’s eyes, nose, and mouth according to manga style. This project is recommended for artists from age 10 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 17 PAGES – 25 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – Revised 2006
  33. 33. -2- SETTING UP PROPORTIONAL GUIDELINES In this section, I take you step by step through the process of setting up proportional guidelines for a frontal view of a young anime cartoon. Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. ILLUSTRATION 06-01 You can use the proportional guidelines in this lesson for drawing tons of different anime children. 1. With a ruler, draw a square any size you wish. The entire face of Bitty, including the ears and forehead will fit inside this square. The bigger the square, the bigger your completed drawing will be. Keep your lines very light by pressing very gently on the paper with your pencil (I used an HB). ILLUSTRATION 06-02 2. Measure and mark the halfway points along the two sides of the square. 3. Use a ruler to draw a straight line (marked line AB) through these points, thereby dividing your square into two identical rectangles. With lots of practice in drawing manga faces, you won’t need to draw the proportional lines with a ruler. You’ll be able to simply eyeball the lines and distances in your mind and draw the proportions of your subject’s face freehand.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  34. 34. -3- ILLUSTRATION 06-03 4. Measure the halfway distance along the top and bottom sides of the square and mark these two points. 5. Draw a vertical line (often referred to as a line of symmetry) through the points, (marked CD). Remember to keep your line light by applying very little pressure to your pencil as you draw. With the addition of this line (CD) the original big square is now divided into four small squares. Symmetry is balanced arrangement (sometimes referred to as a mirror image) of lines and shapes on opposite sides of an often-imaginary centerline. ILLUSTRATION 06-04 6. Sketch a circle inside the big square. Use the sides of the big square and the two lines (AB and CD) to help guide you toward drawing a great-looking circle. A couple of helpful hints for drawing a circle include: Try rotating your paper and looking at your drawing from different perspectives. This little trick often allows you insights into the problem areas. Looking at the reflection of your circle in a mirror will also help you to see areas in need of fixing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  35. 35. -4- ILLUSTRATION 06-05 7. Lightly sketch two more vertical lines slightly inside the right and left sections of the circle. 8. Mark these two lines EF and GH. With the addition of these two lines, your proportional guidelines are complete. In the next section I show you how to use these guidelines to sketch the facial feature and ears. SKETCHING THE FACIAL FEATURES, EARS, AND HAIR The various shapes and lines of the proportional guideline help identify the placement of every aspect of a frontal view of a baby anime’s face and head. ILLUSTRATION 06-06 Shape refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. Form as applied to drawing, is the illusion of the three-dimensional structure of a shape, such as a circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective. 9. Erase the lines of the outer square. 10. Lightly sketch Bitty’s ears below line AB and inside the circular shape. The entire lower section of the face, including the ears, will fit into the bottom half of the circle. Take note that the upper edges of the ears touch line AB.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  36. 36. -5- Before you attempt to draw eyes, you need to be familiar with the names of each part. The same names that identify the various parts of realistic eyes are also used for anime eyes. Refer to the next drawing and become familiar with the following terms: 1. The arch-shaped group of hairs, above the eye, is known as an eyebrow. 2. A fold in the skin, above the eye is called an upper eyelid crease. 3. The upper eyelid is a movable fold of skin that opens and closes to protect the eyeball. 4. A small triangular shape in the inside corner of the eye, is called the inner corner (rarely drawn in manga art). 5. The white of the eye (the visible section of the eyeball) is light, but not really white. 6. A highlight is the brightest area where light bounces off the surface of the eye. 7. Eyelashes are fine hairs that grow from the outer edges of the upper and lower eyelids. 8. The pupil of an eye is the darkest circular shape within the iris. 9. The iris is the colored circular section of the eyeball surrounding the pupil. 10. The lower eyelid is a fold of skin protecting the lower section of the eyeball. ILLUSTRATION 06-07Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  37. 37. -6- ILLUSTRATION 06-08 11. Lightly sketch two ovals to mark the place where the irises of Bitty’s eyes are. The irises are very large and take up a lot of space on the lower section of the tiny face. Observe that the bottom of each iris ends more than halfway down between line CD and the bottom of the chin. Also note that the distance between the eyes is quite a bit more than the width of an iris. ILLUSTRATION 06-09 12. Add Bitty’s eyebrows above her eyes. The eyebrows are shaped like commas with the wider ends pointed toward the center section of her forehead. 13. Sketch in a tiny curved line as Bitty’s nose touching line CD, and about halfway between line AB and the bottom of the chin. 14. Add another curved line close to the bottom of the chin as the mouth.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  38. 38. -7- ILLUSTRATION 06-10 15. Sketch a small circular shape in the upper left of each iris to represent the highlights of the eyes. ILLUSTRATION 06-11 16. Add a partial oval shape inside each iris to represent the pupils of the eyes. Take note that the outline of each pupil ends at the point where it meets the highlight. Also observe that the space between the outline of the pupil and the outline of the iris is the same all around.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  39. 39. -8- ILLUSTRATION 06-12 17. Sketch in the various strands of hair resting on Bitty’s forehead around the upper section of her face. Observe the following before you begin to draw: a. The lines are all curved even though her hair looks straight. b. All sections of hair end in a sharp point. c. The longest section of her bangs is right in the middle and the lines curve toward the left. ILLUSTRATION 06-13 18. Lightly sketch another line on each side of her forehead connecting the bangs of her hair to the inside upper section of each ear.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  40. 40. -9- 19. Sketch the strands of hair around the perimeter of her head. ILLUSTRATION 06-14 Examine the distances between the outer strands of hair and the perimeter of her face to help you draw your proportions more accurately. The hair is considerably higher than the top of her forehead to allow for the upper section of her head (often called the skull or cranium) under the hair. ILLUSTRATION 06-15 20. Lightly sketch more strands of hair on the top of Bitty’s head.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  41. 41. - 10 - ILLUSTRATION 06-16 21. Erase all remaining guidelines and sections of her skull and ears that are behind her hair. 22. Redraw any sections that are accidentally erased. 23. Use your kneaded eraser to pat your entire drawing until the lines are so light that you can barely see them. OUTLINING BITTY’S HAIR, FACE, AND EARS In this section you discover all the fun parts of this project. The crisp neat lines of the manga style will replace your original sketch lines. You first neatly outline Bitty’s face and hair, and then (in the final section of this lesson) you draw the details of her eyes. Your outline can be drawn with either pencil or a very fine tip black marker. Even though the following text instructions are for pencil, I used a fine tip black marker to complete my drawing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  42. 42. - 11 - If you are working in pencil, you may need to re-sharpen your pencil several times as your work to keep the lines thin and neat. Consider using a freshly sharpened 2B pencil and you can use a sandpaper block to keep the point very sharp. If you are planning to use a marker, take your time and slowly and carefully redraw each line. 24. Use a very sharp pencil to outline each strand of hair with neat crisp lines. ILLUSTRATION 06-17Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  43. 43. - 12 - ILLUSTRATION 06-18 25. Outline the ears and the perimeter of the face with nice neat lines. Observe how the shape of the face at the bottom, is curved so as to look like a chin and two chubby cheeks. DRAWING THE DETAILS OF THE EYES AND FACE The faces of very young anime cartoon characters are similar to human children. In this section, simple guidelines show you how to draw Bitty’s eyes, nose, and mouth according to manga style.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  44. 44. - 13 - 26. Outline Bitty’s irises, pupils, highlights, eyebrows, nose, and mouth. ILLUSTRATION 06-19 27. Draw two dark, thick, slightly curved lines along the upper sections of each iris to indicate the edges of her upper eyelids. Observe that these lines extend beyond the width of the irises in two directions - toward the center of her face and the outside edge of her face and slightly downward. ILLUSTRATION 06-20Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  45. 45. - 14 - 28. Add some curved lines to the outer edges of her eyes to represent eyelashes. When you are drawing eyelashes, resist the temptation to draw too many. Less is more! ILLUSTRATION 06-21 29. Use a 6B pencil to fill in the pupils of the eyes. ILLUSTRATION 06-22Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  46. 46. - 15 - 30. Fill in the upper left section of each iris around the highlight. This dark section helps make the eyes look bright and shiny. ILLUSTRATION 06-23 31. Add three parallel angular lines in the upper left section of each iris. ILLUSTRATION 06-24Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  47. 47. - 16 - 32. Add a dark line along the lower eyelid with a few tiny lashes on the outer ends. 33. Pat yourself on the back for having done a great job with your drawing! ILLUSTRATION 06-25 If you enjoyed drawing this anime baby, you may want to consider drawing her big sister Kira, in Beginner B-level.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  48. 48. - 17 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  49. 49. Brenda Hoddinott C-07 BEGINNER: DRAW WITH LINES This fun project takes you step by step through the process of setting up proportional guidelines, and drawing the facial features and hair, of a female anime character named Kira. If you choose to render this drawing completely in pencil you need: good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneaded and vinyl erasers, pencil sharpener, sandpaper block, and a ruler. If you plan to use a marker for the final version, you will also need a fine tip permanent marker, and you should use a drawing paper that is specifically designed for drawing with markers, rather than regular paper.Mangas originated in Japan and are popular with artists of every age all over the world! The eyesgenerally appear disproportionately large, and the nose and mouth tend to be drawn small andsimple so as to emphasize the powerful expressions of the eyes.This project is divided into the following sections: INTRODUCTION SETTING UP FACIAL PROPORTIONS SKETCHING KIRA’S FACE AND HAIR THE PARTS OF AN EYE DRAWING THE INDIVIDUAL FACIAL FEATURES SKETCHING MORE DETAILED INFORMATION ADDING FINAL TOUCHES WITH THIN NEAT LINES This project is recommended for artists from age 10 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 17 PAGES – 28 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – Revised 2006
  50. 50. -2- INTRODUCTION While Mangas originated in Japan, today these comic books, based on a unique genre of cartooning, are popular with artists of every age all over the world! The overall proportions of most manga adult faces closely resemble those of a young human child, giving the characters the appearance of having a childlike head attached to a mature adult body. The eyes generally appear disproportionately large, and are the most expressive part of the face. The nose and mouth tend to be drawn small and simple so as to further emphasize the powerful expressions of the eyes and the facial area around the eyes. Keep in mind that the term Manga encompasses a vast array of individual styles, which allows artists to use their creative license in the design of their characters’ faces, hairstyles, personalities, and clothing. If you choose to render this drawing completely in pencil you need: good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneaded and vinyl erasers, pencil sharpener, sandpaper block, and a ruler. If you plan to use a marker for the final version, you will also need a fine tip permanent marker, and you should use a drawing paper that is specifically designed for drawing with markers, rather than regular paper. GLOSSARY OF ART TERMS Curved lines: are created when a straight line curves (or bends). Curved lines can be drawn thick or thin. Drawing: is the application of an art medium to a surface so as to produce a visual image, which visually defines an artist’s choice of drawing subjects from his or her own unique perspective. Form: as applied to drawing, is the illusion of the three-dimensional structure of a shape, such as a circle, square or triangle, created in a drawing with shading and/or perspective. Light source: is the direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement of this light source affects every aspect of a drawing. The light source tells you where to draw all the light values and shadows. Proportion: is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. Shape: refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. Sketch: is a quick, rough representation or outline of a planned drawing subject. A sketch can also be a completed work of art. Symmetry: is balanced arrangement (sometimes referred to as a mirror image) of lines and shapes on opposite sides of an often-imaginary centerline. Values: are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  51. 51. -3- SETTING UP FACIAL PROPORTIONS In this section, simple guidelines show you how to place Kira’s features on her face. Keep in mind that the faces of many adult manga characters are similar to those of real life children. I now take you step by step through the process of setting up proportional guidelines on a frontal view of an adult female anime head in preparation for drawing facial features. Remember, you can use these same guidelines for drawing tons of different anime characters. 1. Use a ruler to draw a straight line down the center of your page. Use an HB pencil, and keep your line very light so it can be easily erased. This is a line of symmetry and provides you with a guideline for drawing both sides of the head the same size. You simply measure various horizontal distances on either side of the center line. 2. Lightly sketch an egg-shape with the small end at the bottom of your drawing space. Use your line of symmetry to make sure both sides are approximately the same size. 3. Refine your egg-shape so it more closely resembles the shape of a human head. ILLUSTRATION 07-01 ILLUSTRATION 07-02Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  52. 52. -4- 4. Measure the distance from the top of the head to the chin along your line of symmetry. 5. Divide this distance in half and mark this point on the line of symmetry. 6. Draw a horizontal line through the point. Remember to keep your line very light by applying very little pressure to your pencil as you draw. This line marks the placement of the tops of the eyes. 7. Measure the distance between the horizontal line and the bottom of the chin, divide this distance in half, and mark it with a dot. 8. Draw a second horizontal line through this point. This line marks the location of the lowest section of the tip of the nose. The mouth will be drawn below it. ILLUSTRATION 07-03 ILLUSTRATION 07-04Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  53. 53. -5- SKETCHING KIRA’S FACE AND HAIR It’s now time to use the proportional guidelines to begin sketching Kira’s facial features and hair in their correct places. 9. Measure the distance from the vertical line of symmetry to each outer edge of the head along the upper horizontal line. 10. Mark each point with a dot (or a tiny vertical line). These two dots mark the vertical centers of the eyes. Now you know both the position of the top of each eye (the upper horizontal line), and where the center of each eye will be. 11. Lightly sketch two circular shapes to represent the eyes. Observe that the bottom of each eye ends approximately halfway between the two horizontal lines. Also note that the distance between the eyes is slightly more than the width of an eye. ILLUSTRATION 07-05 ILLUSTRATION 07-06 With lots of practice in drawing manga faces, you won’t need to draw the proportional lines with a ruler. You’ll be able to simply eyeball the lines and distances in your mind.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  54. 54. -6- ILLUSTRATION 07-07 12. Sketch in a tiny curved line slightly above the lower horizontal line to represent the lower tip of the nose. 13. Add a line almost halfway down from the lower horizontal line. This line marks the placement of the lower edge of the bottom lip. ILLUSTRATION 07-08 14. Draw Kira’s ears (or ear). You only need to draw the one on the right because the other will be hidden under her hair. Take note that the upper edges of the ears touch the upper horizontal line, and the bottoms touch the lower one. 15. Carefully erase the guidelines including the line of symmetry. You may need to redraw a few sections that are accidentally erased. Drawing a realistic circle freehand becomes quite simple when you’ve devoted lots of time to practicing this skill. A couple of helpful hints include: 1. Try rotating your paper and looking at your drawing from different perspectives. This little trick often allows you insight into the problem areas. 2. Looking at the reflection of your circle in a mirror will also help you to see areas in need of fixing.Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com

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