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Advanced Multicast Resiliency Webinar

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Efficient and reliable delivery of multicast services with minimal complexity has been challenge for providers for a very long time. The surge in video deployment exacerbated these challenges. Video …

Efficient and reliable delivery of multicast services with minimal complexity has been challenge for providers for a very long time. The surge in video deployment exacerbated these challenges. Video is very sensitive to losses and consumes enormous resources which incurs a tremendous burden on existing infrastructure. With the goal of minimizing the cost and maximizing the cost per bit, Cisco has enhanced its existing implementation and added new features to help providers to achieve superior QOE with minimal design changes in existing infra and reduced capex-opex. In this session we will cover different multicast resiliency technologies and related deployment details.

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  • 1. Cisco TechAdvantage Webinars Advanced Multicast ResiliencyRabiul HasanUjjwal Vinod© 2013 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Follow us @GetYourBuildOn 1
  • 2. Speakers Panelists Ujjwal Vinod Rabiul Hasan Toerless Eckert Andy Kessler Technical Engineer Product Manager Principal Engineer Technical Leader uvinod@cisco.com rabhasan@cisco.com eckert@cisco.com kessler@cisco.com© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2
  • 3. •  Submit questions in Q&A panel and send to “All Panelists” Avoid CHAT window for better access to panelists •  For WebEx audio, select COMMUNICATE > Join Audio Broadcast •  For WebEx call back, click ALLOW phone button at the bottom of participants side panel •  Where can I get the presentation? Or send email to: ask_techadvantage@cisco.com •  Please complete the post-event survey •  Join us for upcoming TechAdvantage Webinars: www.cisco.com/go/techadvantage© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 3
  • 4. •  Multicast Overview and Business Drivers•  TI MoFRR•  Anycast RP using PIM•  PIM HSRP•  PIM BFD•  MVR© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4
  • 5. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 5
  • 6. Host Unicast Router Host Multicast Router Today we think only of distribution trees when thinking of multicast. But this is not how it started…© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 6
  • 7. By  2014  10%  of  all  Internet  video  content    will  be  live  © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7
  • 8. One to Many Many to Many Many to One •  Audio/Video •  Conferencing •  Resource Discovery •  Push Media •  Sharing Resources •  Data Collection •  Distribution •  Games •  Others •  Announcement •  Others •  Monitoring Multicast Applications© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8
  • 9.   Finance (Trading, Market Data, Financial SP)   Tibco, Hoot-n-Holler, Data Systems  Enterprise Video and collaborative environments   Cisco TelePresence®, DMS, MP/WebEx   Video Conferencing, Video Surveillance  Broadband (Entertainment)   Includes Cable, DSL, ETTH, LRE, Wireless   Broadcast TV / IP/TV, VOD, Connected Home  Service Provider (Transit Services)   Native v4 and v6   Label Switched Multicast (LSM)   Multicast VPNs (IP and MPLS-based) © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 9
  • 10. “Resilience is the ability or power to return the original form, position, etc., after being bent,compressed or stretched”  Why Multicast Resiliency   Multicast applications are mission critical and packet loss is not acceptable   Packet Loss is inevitable and hard to eliminate   Drop packet is better than delayed packets   Delayed packet is as good as drop packets  Resiliency in Multicast   Network Based Solution - Redundant source, Fast Reroute and Convergence, Path Diversity   Application Awareness© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10
  • 11. •  Multicast Overview and Business Drivers•  TI MoFRR•  Anycast RP using PIM•  PIM HSRP•  PIM BFD•  MVR© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11
  • 12. Sx2 ACCESS EDGE-EDGE ANYCAST RP Using MSDP 3 DISTRIBUTION EDGE RP_ADD: 1.1.1.1/32 RP_ADD: 1.1.1.1/32 R11 R12 EDGE-DISTRIBUTION 13.1 .1.1 /24 12.1.1.1/24 14.1.1.1/24 PIM_JOIN PIM_JOIN 2 14.1.1.2/24 12.1.1.2/24 13.1 .1.2 IP/MPLS CORE /24 S12 S11 PIM_JOIN PIM_JOIN To reach 1.1.1.1/24 (2 ECMP paths) To reach 1.1.1.1/24 (2 ECMP paths) A) nexthop1: 14.1.1.1 B) nexthop2: 13.1.1.1 A) nexthop1: 12.1.1.1 B) nexthop2: 11.1.1.1 VRF/Global Choose 14.1.1.1, since nexthop1 > Choose 12.1.1.1, since nexthop1 > nexthop2 nexthop2 PIM_JOIN EDGE PIM_JOIN DISTRIBUTION-ACCESS S11 S12 DR DR DISTRIBUTION IGMP_REPORT 1 IGMP_REPORT VLAN S1 S2 ACCESS© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 12
  • 13. •  Multicast Overview and Business Drivers•  TI MoFRR•  Anycast RP using PIM•  PIM HSRP•  PIM BFD•  MVR© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13
  • 14. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 14
  • 15. Source1)  MoFRR (Multicast Only Fast Re-Route) allows fast STREAM reroute for multicast traffic on a multicast router by 3 sending PIM joins on two ECMP upstream interfaces towards the source over disjoint paths in the network. IP/MPLS CLOUD2)  Thereby receiving two copies of the multicast traffic on two different interfaces3)  Pick the primary traffic stream to forward downstream and discard the backup stream4)  A mechanism to detect the failure in the primary 2 stream and switching to the backup stream PIM JOIN5)  MoFRR is a edge functionality and does not require any functionality change in the rest of the network 1 IGMP REPORT Receiver© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 15
  • 16. TOPOLOGIES: 1)  MoFRR was originally proposed for ECMP dual-plane topologies where the node implementing MoFRR has at least two ECMP paths towards the source of the multicast traffic 2)  New enhancements describe how MoFRR can be supported on in non-ECMP or ring topologies TRIGGERS: 1)  IGP/RIB Based (Routing Protocol Convergence) 2)  Flow Based (Per flow failure detection) 3)  Vidmon http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios-xml/ios/ipmulti_serv/configuration/xe-3s/Multicast_only_Fast_Re-Route.html#GUID-96378D82-19DE-4A9B-A7C2-425F61133160 http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/routers/asr9000/software/asr9k_r3.9/multicast/configuration/guide/mc39mcst.html For Your Reference© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 16
  • 17. 1)  Overcomes the ECMP limitation XR 4.3.0 2)  Simple deployable solution 3)  100% Path Diversity (i.e. TE-like ERO) 4)  Works in any ECMP or Non-ECMP topologies such as mesh, ring, hub-spoke, star, etc. 5)  Consistent and predictable: sub 50 msec solution 6)  No loops or micro-loops in the Network 7)  Present support only for IPv4, with native PIM in global context. HW dependency: ASR9K platform, with second-generation LC (Typhoon NP) http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9853/index.html For Your Reference© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 17
  • 18. SOURCES & RECEIVERS directly connected to directly Receiver Source HEAD-NODE & TAIL-NODE respectively MID-NODE MID-NODE TAIL-NODE HEAD-NODE MID-NODE MID-NODE© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 18
  • 19. SOURCES & RECEIVERS indirectly connected to Receiver Source HEAD-NODE & TAIL-NODE respectively MID-NODE MID-NODE TAIL-NODE HEAD-NODE MID-NODE MID-NODE© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 19
  • 20. MID-NODEs need not be MoFRR aware Receiver Source MID-NODE MID-NODE TAIL-NODE HEAD-NODE MID-NODE MID-NODE© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 20
  • 21. RFC-4601, 5384, 5496, draft-asghar-pim- explicit-rpf-vector-01 For Your ReferencePIM VER TYPE RESERVED CHECKSUM ADDR FAMILY [1/2] ENCODING TYPE [0] UNICAST ADDRESS …… UPSTREAM NEIGHBOR ADDRESS (Encoded-Unicast format) ……… UNICAST ADDRESS RESVERED # OF GROUPS HOLD TIME MULTICAST GROUP ADDRESS #1 (Encoded-Group format) ADDR FAMILY [1/2] ENCODING TYPE [0] B RESV Z MASK LEN # OF JOINED SOURCES # OF PRUNED SOURCES GROUP MULTICAST ADDRESS JOINED SOURCE ADDRESS #1 (Encoded-Source format) ADDR FAMILY [1/2] ENCODING TYPE [0] RESV S W R MASK LEN JOINED SOURCE ADDRESS #N (Encoded-Source format) SOURCE ADDRESS PRUNED SOURCE ADDRESS #1 (Encoded-Source format) PRUNED SOURCE ADDRESS #M (Encoded-Source format) ADDR FAMILY [1/2] ENCODING TYPE [1] RESV S W R MASK LEN MULTICAST GROUP ADDRESS #P (Encoded-Group format) SOURCE ADDRESS F E ATTR TYPE LENGTH VALUE EPV TLV:: There can multiple PIM JOIN/PRUNE MESSAGE EPV (Explicit Path Vector) TLV on single encoding F E ATTR TYPE LENGTH VALUE © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 21
  • 22. 1)  Bringing Path-Diversity to Multicast   It’s like RSVP-TE ERO   It allows explicit-routing of PIM Joins   No loops or micro-loops 2)  Explicit Path Vector TLV Encoding: (Example1) R2 R3 R4 PIM JOIN Multicast Source IP: 3 2 S = 10.0.0.1 1 4 R1 R5 IGMP REPORT 1 : 11.0.0.1 2 : 12.0.0.1 Source Receiver PIM JOIN 3 : 13.0.0.1 10.0.0.1 4 : 14.0.0.1 R8 R7 R6© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 22
  • 23. 3)  Explicit Path Vector TLV Encoding: (Example2)   R3: Explicit-Path Vector unaware R2 R3 R4 PIM JOIN Multicast Source IP: 2 S = 10.0.0.1 1 3 R1 R5 IGMP REPORT 1 : 11.0.0.1 2 : 13.0.0.1 Source Receiver 3 : 14.0.0.1 10.0.0.1 R8 R7 R6© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 23
  • 24. (S1,G) PIM JOIN IGMP/PIM (S,G) JOIN TI-MoFRR (S2,G) PIM JOIN 1)  JOIN CLONING: Original (S,G) Join is cloned to (S1,G) and (S2,G) PIM Join   Explicit Path Vector TLV used for PIM-Tree explicit routing   Cloned (S1,G) PIM Join used to build primary PIM tree   Cloned (S2,G) PIM Join is used to build backup PIM tree 2)  TRAFFIC DE-CLONING/TRANSLATION: 3)  P/PE ROLE: 4)  MONITORING & SWITCHING:© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 24
  • 25. (S1,G) PIM JOIN (S,G) PIM JOIN TI-MoFRR (S2,G) PIM JOIN 1)  JOIN DE-CLONING: Original (S,G) Join is cloned to (S1,G) and (S2,G) PIM Join   Converts (S1, G) and (S2, G) PIM JOINs to (S, G) PIM JOIN.   Transmit (S,G) PIM JOIN towards upstream neighbor. 2)  TRAFFIC REPLICATION/CLONING:© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 25
  • 26. (S,G) Traffic (S1,G) Traffic (S,G) Traffic (S2,G) Traffic (S,G) Traffic Head-Node TI-MoFRR Functions: 1. Clone (S1,G) 2. Primary: Re-write S to S1 => (S1,G) Tail-Node TI-MoFRR Functions: 3. Backup: Re-write S to S2 => (S2,G) 1. Perform MoFRR 2. Specify S1/S2 prefixes in MoFRR 3. Re-write S1 and S2 to S => (S,G)© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 26
  • 27. S: Source E2 E0 E1 E0 E1 E0 E1 E0 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E2 Receiver1 E2 Receiver2© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 27
  • 28. S: Source JOIN ) PIM (S1,G E2 E0 E1 E0 E1 E0 E1 E0 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E2 Receiver1 E2 Receiver2© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 28
  • 29. (S2,G) (S2,G) S: Source IIF: MoFRR1 PIM J OIN IIF: E1 OIF: E0 (S1,G) OIF: E0 (S1,G) IIF: MoFRR1 E2 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S1,G) E0 IIF: E0 E1 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S2,G) IIF: E1 OIF: E0 E0 E1 E1 (S1,G) IIF: E0 (S2,G) OIF: MoFRR1 E0 E0 IIF: E1 OIF: E0 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E2 (S2,G) Receiver1 IIF: E1 OIF: MoFRR1 (S2,G) (S2,G) IIF: E1 E2 IIF: E1 OIF: E0 OIF: E0 Receiver2© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 29
  • 30. (S2,G) (S2,G) S: Source IIF: MoFRR1 PIM J OIN IIF: E1 OIF: E0 (S1,G) OIF: E0 (S1,G) IIF: MoFRR1 E2 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S1,G) E0 IIF: E0 E1 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S2,G) IIF: E1 OIF: E0 E0 E1 E1 (S1,G) IIF: E0 (S2,G) OIF: MoFRR1 E0 E0 IIF: E1 OIF: E0 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E2 (S2,G) Receiver1 IIF: E1 OIF: MoFRR1 (S2,G) (S2,G) IIF: E1 E2 IIF: E1 OIF: E0 OIF: E0 Receiver2© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 30
  • 31. (S2,G) (S2,G) S: Source IIF: MoFRR1 PIM J OIN IIF: E1 OIF: E0 (S1,G) OIF: E0 (S1,G) IIF: MoFRR1 E2 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S1,G) E0 IIF: E0 E1 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S2,G) IIF: E1 OIF: E0 E0 E1 E1 (S1,G) IIF: E0 (S2,G) OIF: MoFRR1 E0 E0 IIF: E1 (S1,G) E1 OIF: E0 IIF: E0 OIF: MoFRR1 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E2 (S2,G) Receiver1 IIF: E1 OIF: MoFRR1 (S2,G) (S2,G) IIF: E1 E2 IIF: E1 OIF: E0 OIF: E0 Receiver2 MoFRR1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 31
  • 32. (S2,G) (S2,G) S: Source IIF: MoFRR1 PIM J OIN IIF: E1 OIF: E0 (S1,G) OIF: E0 (S1,G) IIF: MoFRR1 E2 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S1,G) E0 IIF: E0 E1 OIF: E1 E0 E1 (S2,G) IIF: E1 OIF: E0 E0 E1 E1 (S1,G) IIF: E0 (S2,G) OIF: MoFRR1 E0 E0 IIF: E1 (S1,G) E1 OIF: E0 IIF: E0 OIF: MoFRR1 E1 E1 E0 E0 E1 E2 (S2,G) Receiver1 IIF: E1 OIF: MoFRR1 (S2,G) (S2,G) IIF: E1 E2 IIF: E1 OIF: E0 OIF: E0 Receiver2 MoFRR1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 32
  • 33. CMTS and QAM aggregation CMTS1 (S,G) Traffic (S1,G) Traffic CMTSn (S,G) Traffic QAM1 (S,G) Traffic (S1,G) Traffic QAMm© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 33
  • 34. R2 R3 R4 PIM JOIN Multicast Source IP: 3 2 S = 10.0.0.1 1 4 R1 R5 IGMP REPORT 1 : 11.0.0.1 2 : 12.0.0.1 Source Receiver 3 : 13.0.0.1 10.0.0.1 8 5 4 : 14.0.0.1 7 6 R8 R7 R6 PIM JOIN 5 : 15.0.0.1 6 : 16.0.0.1 Using Strict ERO (Explicit-hop-by-hop routing, config needed only on last hop) 7 : 17.0.0.1 router pim For Your Reference 8 : 18.0.0.1 rpf-vector process explicit-rpf-vector inject 10.10.10.1 masklen 24 11.0.0.1 12.0.0.1 13.0.0.1 14.0.0.1 explicit-rpf-vector inject 10.10.10.1 masklen 24 15.0.0.1 16.0.0.1 17.0.0.1 18.0.0.1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 34
  • 35. R2 R3 R4 PIM JOIN Multicast Source IP: 2 S = 10.0.0.1 1 3 R1 R5 IGMP REPORT 1 : 11.0.0.1 2 : 13.0.0.1 Source Receiver 3 : 14.0.0.1 10.0.0.1 6 4 4 : 15.0.0.1 5 R8 R7 R6 5 : 17.0.0.1 6 : 18.0.0.1 Using Loose ERO (using ERO with RIB lookup, config needed only on last hop) router pim For Your rpf-vector process Reference rpf-vector inject 2.2.2.1 masklen 24 11.0.0.1 13.0.0.1 14.0.0.1 rpf-vector inject 2.2.2.1 masklen 24 15.0.0.1 17.0.0.1 18.0.0.1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 35
  • 36. R2 R3 R4 PIM JOIN Multicast Source IP: 3 2 S = 10.0.0.1 1 4 R1 R5 IGMP REPORT 1 : 11.0.0.1 2 : 12.0.0.1 Source Receiver 3 : 13.0.0.1 10.0.0.1 7 5 4 : 14.0.0.1 6 R8 R7 R6 PIM JOIN 5 : 15.0.0.1 6 : 17.0.0.1 Using Strict ERO (Explicit-hop-by-hop routing, config needed only on last hop) 7 : 18.0.0.1 router pim For Your rpf-vector process Reference explicit-rpf-vector inject 10.10.10.1 masklen 24 11.0.0.1 12.0.0.1 13.0.0.1 14.0.0.1 rpf-vector inject 2.2.2.1 masklen 24 15.0.0.1 17.0.0.1 18.0.0.1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 36
  • 37. R2 R3 R4 PIM JOIN R1 R5 IGMP REPORT Source Receiver 10.0.0.1 R8 R7 R6 PIM JOIN router pim address-family ipv4 For Your mofrr Reference flow mofrr-acl clone source 10.0.0.1 to 20.0.0.1 and 21.0.0.1 masklen 32© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 37
  • 38. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 38
  • 39. 1)  Anycast-RP in simplistic terms, is a mechanism that ISP-based backbones use to get fast convergence when a PIM Rendezvous Point (RP) router fails. 2)  To achieve this we should have multiple RPs in particular domain. Receivers and sources should initiate communication via closest RP. But to have consistent information across RPs, the packets from a source needs to get to all RPs to find interested receivers. 3)  This notion of receivers finding sources is the fundamental problem of source discovery that MSDP [RFCs 3618, 3446, 4611] was intended to solve. 4)  However, if one would like to retain the Anycast-RP benefits with less protocol machinery and for IPv6 space, there is another option available [RFC 4610]. IGMPv2 (*,G1) Report Data stream for (S1,G1) RP 1 r1 1 R2 5 R1 2 1 r2 IGMPv2 (*,G1) Report RP R3© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 39
  • 40. 1)  R1, R2, R3, R4 are configured with same IP address which is used as the Anycast-RP address (Rx). Let’s assume Rx is configured on interface r1 loopback-0 of all these boxes. r11 2)  R1, R2, R3, R4 are configured with addresses RP1, RP2, RP3, RP4 respectively which are used by R1 Anycast-RP routers to communicate among each Anycast-RP addr: RPx r4 Loopback addr: RP1 other. Let’s assume these addresses are configured RP-set: {RP1, RP2, RP3, RP4} on interface loopback-1 of all these boxes. r2 R2 Anycast-RP addr: RPx R4 3)  All these addresses Rx, RP1, RP2, RP3, and RP4 Loopback addr: RP2 Anycast-RP addr: RPx RP-set: {RP1, RP2, RP3, RP4} Loopback addr: RP4 are injected into the unicast routing database of this RP-set: {RP1, RP2, RP3, RP4} complete domain. R3 Anycast-RP addr: RPx Loopback addr: RP3 4)  Each router in the Anycast-RP set is configured with RP-set: {RP1, RP2, RP3, RP4} the addresses of all other routers in the Anycast-RP set. This must be consistently configured in all RPs in the set. r3© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 40
  • 41. 1) Src1 starts sending packets Data stream for (S1,G1) 2) r1 [DR] creates (S1,G1) states and sends a register Src1 Rx3 to R1. IGMPv r1 3) Upon receiving the register, R1 performs normal PIM- r11 SM RP functionality. 2 Rx4 (*,G1) Rx1 R1 4) R1 also sends the register (which may encapsulate r4 the data packets) to R2, R3 and R4. 5) R2, R3 and R4 don’t further forward the register to r2 each other. R2 IGMPv2 (*,G1) R4 6) R2, R3 and R4 perform normal PIM-SM RP functionality, and if there are interested receivers, forward the packets on downstream tree built till leaf R3 Rx2 node. Src2 r3© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 41
  • 42. IOS Configuration: Src1 r1 Rx3 ipv6 pim rp-address 2001:ABC::1:1 ! r11 interface Loopback0 Rx4 ipv6 address 2001:ABC::1:1/128 Rx1 R1 ! r4 Anycast-RP addr: RPx interface Loopback1 Loopback addr: RP1 ipv6 address 2001:111::1:1/128 RP-set: {RP1, RP2, RP3, RP4} ! r2 R2 R4 ipv6 pim anycast-rp 2001:111::1:1 2001:111::2:2 2001:111::3:3 2001:111::4:4 R3 Rx2 Src2 r3© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 42
  • 43. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 43
  • 44. 1)  No inherent redundancy capability for PIM. 2)  Completely independent of Hot Standby Redundancy Protocol (HSRP) group states. 3)  IP multicast traffic is forwarded not necessarily by the same router elected by HSRP. 4)  Need to provide consistent IP multicast forwarding in redundant network with Virtual Router Group (VRG) enabled. 5)  Goal is to make HSRP Active Router (AR) interoperable with PIM Designated Router (DR) and IGMP Querier. CORE CORE R1 R2 R1 R2 Gi1/0 Gi1/1 Gi1/0 Gi1/1 S1 S1 3 PIM neighbors 2 PIM neighbors r1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 44
  • 45. CORE 6)  Downstream device has static unicast route configuration to VIP (Virtual IP) only. 7)  Allows all PIM Join/Prune to reach the HSRP group VIP. This minimizes changes and configurations at the downstream device side. They need to know just the VIP. R1 R2 Gi1/0 Gi1/1 8)  PIM is responsible for adjusting DR priority based on the group state. S1 r1 Why doesnt PIM Sparse Mode Work with a Static Route to an HSRP Address? http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk828/technologies_tech_note09186a0080094aab.shtml© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 45
  • 46. 9)  With HSRP Aware PIM enabled, PIM sends an additional CORE PIM Hello message using the HSRP virtual IP addresses as the source address for each active HSRP group when a Existing active device becomes HSRP Active. going down 10) The PIM Hello will carry a new GenID in order to trigger other routers to respond to the failover. R1 R2 Gi1/0 Gi1/1 11) The new GenID carried in the PIM Hello will trigger S1 downstream routers to resend PIM Join messages towards PIM HELLO the virtual address. Upstream routers will process PIM Join/Prunes (J/P) based on HSRP group state. r1 12) If the J/P destination matches the HSRP group virtual address and if the destination device is in HSRP active state, the new AR processes the PIM Join because it is now the acting PIM DR.© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 46
  • 47. 1)  Stateful failover is not supported. CORE 2)  During PIM stateless failover, the HSRP groups virtual IP address transfers over to the standby, but no mroute sate NO MROUTE STATE SYNC information is transferred to the standby. R2 3)  HSRP IPv6 is not supported. R1 Gi1/0 Gi1/1 4)  Not supported with VRRP, GLBP. S1 r1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 47
  • 48. Rx   R3/R4 configure static route to Rx, always use Rx as nexthop when sending PIM J/P messages. 3   PIM Hello got exchanged among R1, R2, R3, R4. R1 R2 Gi1/0 Gi1/1   Say, R1 was acting as Active Router. PIM Hello is also sent 2 by R1 with Rx as source address. PIM Hello from Rx will carry S1 a pre-configured PIM DR priority for HSRP, which ensures new active always becomes new DR for this subnet. 1   R3/R4 receive PIM hello from R1, R2 and Rx, they have Rx as both RPF and PIM neighbor. S2   From downstream, PIM J/P should be sent with nexthop as Gi1/2 Gi1/3 Rx. AR node should process this message. R4 R3 4 IGMP REPORT© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 48
  • 49. Rx   Upon failover (e.g., upstream interface down on S1), R2 (standby) became new active and sent additional PIM Hello by 1) using Rx as source address; 2) increases DR priority as 5 configured. R1 R2 Gi1/0 Gi1/1   R3/R4 received Hello from Rx, added Rx as PIM neighbor S1 and sent PIM Join messages for all (*, G) and (S, G) to Rx. 6   R2 as HSRP AR and processed the PIM Join and immediately reestablished the states. S2   Mroute states on R1 will expired eventually. Gi1/2 Gi1/3 R4 R3 4© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 49
  • 50. IOS Configuration: CORE interface GigabitEthernet1/1 ip address 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0 ip pim redundancy HSRP1 dr-priority 50 ip pim sparse-mode standby 1 ip 160.1.1.99 standby 1 timers 3 10 R2 standby 1 priority 100 R1 standby 1 preempt Gi1/0 Gi1/1 standby 1 name HSRP1 standby 1 track GigabitEthernet1/10 S1 NOTE: There is no change on IGMP Querier election mechanism, which operates independently of HSRP. It is r1 possible that IGMP querier and PIM DR are different routers.© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 50
  • 51. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 51
  • 52. 1)  The minimum failure detection time in PIM will be 3 times of the PIM Query-Interval. 2)  PIM Query-Interval is sub-sec range. 3)  Lower time intervals considerable load on the Protocol, CPU. Not recommended! POWER CORE   Configured hello interval: 100 msec DOWN R1 R2   R1: Gi1/0, elected as DR. Gi1/0 Gi1/1 DR NON-DR   Node R1 powered down. S1   After approx. 300 sec, R2 will get to know about neighbor down event.© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 52
  • 53.   Bi-Directional Forwarding (BFD) is based on UDP and IP.   Session based.   Agnostic to the type of media.   For supporting BFD in PIM:   PIM registers to the BFD as a client   Enables PIM to interface with BFD to initiate a session with an adjacent PIM node   Single PIM client registration will be done for both PIM v4 and PIM v6.   The neighbor with which BFD session is established can either be a directly connected neighbor or a multi-hop neighbor. R1 PIM PIM R2 v4/6 Hello / Discovery v4/6 BFD PIM bootstraps BFD BFD R1 R2© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 53
  • 54. IOS Configuration: interface GigabitEthernet0/2.2 Following configurations must be done to use this function: encapsulation dot1Q 2 1)  Relevant PIM configuration on the interested interface vrf forwarding vpn_0 2)  BFD to be enabled on the interested interface ip address 20.3.0.1 255.255.255.0 ip pim sparse-dense-mode 3)  PIM BFD to be enabled on the interested interface ip pim bfd ip igmp version 3 bfd interval 50 min_rx 50 multiplier 3 no bfd echo NOTE:   This feature will not be supported for MVPN (over MDT tunnels)   Only supported on interfaces in which both PIM and BFD are supported   Supported for PIM-v4/6   Supported with vrf interfaces also NXOS Configuration: interface Ethernet0/0 ip pim bfd instance© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 54
  • 55. © 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 55
  • 56. •  It allows a L2 switch to deliver multicast packet to multiple receivers reside in different VLANs without L3 replication •  Traffic isolation and flooding domain between VLANs are maintained for other kinds of traffic, such as unknown unicast and broadcast traffic R1 R1 VLAN 50 S1 S1 VLAN 10 VLAN 20 VLAN 30 VLAN 10 VLAN 20 VLAN 30 Stream flow *without* MVR configuration at S1 Stream flow *with* MVR configuration at S1© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 56 56
  • 57. MVR VLAN: A designated VLAN where multicast traffic is received. Hosts can be member of MVR VLAN. R1 MVR SOURCE PORT: IGMP joins and Multicast data are copied to MVR source port. VLAN 50 S1 MVR RECEIVER PORT: Interfaces where mcast (*,G1) IGMP report Receivers are connected to. MVR GROUP: The IGMP group that participate VLAN 10 VLAN 20 VLAN 30 the MVR. Same group can be used for non-MVR receiver port also.© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 57 57
  • 58. IGMP join is processed by MVR when two conditions are met:   Interface on which the join is received has to be MVR receiver port   The group has to be configured as MVR group R1 MVLAN: 50 VLAN 50 #1 MVR SOURCE PORT: #1 S1 #4 MVR RECEIVER PORT: #2, 4 #2 #3 NON-MVR PORT: #3 MVR GROUP: G1 VLAN 10 VLAN 20 VLAN 30 BASIC DESIGN GUIDELINES: (*,G1) IGMP (*,G1) IGMP (*,G2) IGMP report report   MVR requires IGMP Snooping to function properly. report   Same MVR VLANs and same MVR VLAN to MVR group mapping on all switches in the network.© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 58 58
  • 59. IOS Configuration: mvr -------------------------------- Enables MVR on device mvr vlan 200 ---------------------- MVR VLAN mvr max-groups 8000 ------------ Max# of MVR groups mvr group 227.1.1.1 4000 mvr group 227.1.16.161 3900 -------- MVR group addresses mvr group 227.1.32.55 100 R1 interface GigabitEthernet2/0/0 VLAN 50 switchport switchport access vlan 100 S1 switchport mode access (*,G1) IGMP mvr type receiver ---------------------- MVR source port (Receiver report ports can only be access ports) interface GigabitEthernet2/0/1 switchport VLAN 10 VLAN 20 VLAN 30 switchport trunk allowed vlan 100,101,200 switchport mode trunk mvr type source ---------------------- MVR receiver port (Source ports can be either access or trunk ports)© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 59 59
  • 60. NXOS Configuration: mvr-config mvr-vlan 1000 mvr-group 224.1.1.0/24 mvr-group 225.1.1.0/24 mvr-group 226.1.1.0/24 mvr-group 228.1.1.0/24 vlan 1002 -------- (Support one global MVR R1 VLAN and up to 250 MVR VLANs in total) VLAN 50 interface Ethernet1/34 switchport access vlan 101 S1 mvr-group 226.1.1.1 count 10 vlan 1001 --------- (Interface level configuration takes precedence over global MVR configuration) (*,G1) IGMP mvr-type receiver report interface Ethernet1/34 switchport mode trunk VLAN 10 VLAN 20 switchport trunk allow vlan 1000-1002 VLAN 30 mvr-type source© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 60 60
  • 61. •  Thank you! •  Please complete the post-event survey •  Join us for upcoming webinars: Register: www.cisco.com/go/techadvantage Follow us @GetYourBuildOn© 2011 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 61

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