Chapter 4

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Co Taught Physics chapter 4

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Chapter 4

  1. 1. Chapter 4 Linear MotionYou can describe the motion of an object by itposition, speed, direction, and acceleration.
  2. 2. Objectives Explain how you can tell and object is moving. Describe how you can calculate speed. Distinguish between speed and velocity. Describe how you can calculate acceleration. Describe the acceleration of an object in free fall. Describe how the distance fallen per second changes for an object in free fall.
  3. 3. Objectives Describe what the slope of a speed-verses-time graph represents Describe how air resistance affects the motion of falling objects. Explain the relationship between velocity and acceleration.
  4. 4. Key Terms Relative [p. 47] Regarded in relation to something else. Depends on point of view or frame of reference. Speed [p.48] How fast something is moving; the path distance move per time. The magnitude of the velocity vector. Instantaneous speed [p.49] Speed an any instant of time Average speed [p.49] Path distance divided by time.
  5. 5. Key Terms Velocity [p.50] Speed together with the direction of motion. Acceleration [p.51] The rate at which velocity is changing. The change may be in magnitude, direction or both. Free Fall [p.53] Motion under the influence of the gravitational force only. Elapsed time [p.53] The time that has passed since the beginning of the event.
  6. 6. 4.1 Motion is Relative An object is moving if its position relative to a fixed point in changing. When we describe the motion of one obeject with respect to another, we say that the object is moving relative to the other object. Unless stated otherwise, when we discuss the speeds of things in our environment, we mean speed with respect to the surface of Earth.
  7. 7. 4.2 Speed You can calculate the speed of an object by dividing the distance covered by time. Galileo is credited as being the first to measure speed by considering the distance covered and the time it takes. Speed is how fast qn object is moving . Any combination of units for distance and time that are useful and convenient are legitimate for describing speed. Some units that describe speed of an object at any instant is called the instantaneous speed.
  8. 8. 4.2 Speed The average speed of an obect is the total distance covered divided by the time. Averge speed does not indicate variations in the speed that may take place during the trip. A simple rearrangement of the difinition of average speed gives the total distance covered:Total distance covered = average speed x travel time
  9. 9. 4.3 Velocity Speed is a description of how fast an object moves; velocity is how fast and in what direction it moves. Velocity is speed in a given direction. A quanity such as velocity, which specifies direction as well as magnitude, is called a vector quantity. Quantities that require only magnitude for a description are scalar quantities.
  10. 10. 4.3 Velocity Constant speed means steady speed. Constant velocity means both constant speed and constant direction, which is in a straight line. If either an objects speed or its direction (or both) is changing, then the objects velocity is changing.
  11. 11. 4.4 Acceleration You can calculate the acceleration of an objec by dividing the change in its velocity by time. Acceleration is the rate at which the velocity is s. In physics, the term acceleration applies to decreases as well as increases in speed. Acceleration also applies to changes in direction. Acceleration is defined as the rate of change in velocity, rather than speed.
  12. 12. 4.4 Acceleration If an objects speed, direction, or both, chnges, the object changes velocity and accelerates. When the direction is not changing, acceleration may be expressed as the rate at which speed changes. Since acceleration is the change in velocity or speed per time interval, its units are those of speed per time.
  13. 13. 4.5 Free Fall: How Fast The acceleration of an object in free fall is about 10 meters per second squared ( 10 m/s2) Gravity causes objects to accelerate downward once they begin to fall. In real life, air resistance affects the acceleration of a falling object. An object moving under the influence of the gravitational force only is said to be in free fall. Freely falling objects are affected only by gravity.
  14. 14. 4.5 Free Fall: How Fast The elapsed time is the time that haqs elapsed, or passed, since the beginning of any motion. For free fall, it is customary to use the letter g to represent the acceleration because the acceleration is due to gravity. Although g varies slightly in different parts of the world, its average value is nearly 10 m/s2. The instantaneous speed of an object falling from rest after an elapsed time t can be expressed inequation form as v = gt. Note that the letter v symbolizes both speed and velocity.
  15. 15. 4.5 Free Fall: How Fast At the highest point of a rising object, when the ovject is changing its direction of motion from upward to downward, its instantaneous speed is zero. As an object rises, its speed decreases at the same rate it increases when moving downward -at 10 meters per second each second. The instantaneous speed at points of equal elevation in a moving objects path is the same whether the object is moving upward or downward.
  16. 16. 4.6 Free Fall: How Far For each second of free fall a greater distance than it did in the previous second. The initial speed of fall is zero and takes a full second to get to 10 m/s. Whenever an objects initial speed is zero and the acceleration a is constant, that is, steady and "Non- Jerky," the equations for the velocity and distance traveled are: v = at nad d = 1/2 at 2
  17. 17. 4.7 Graphs of Motion On a speed-versus-time graph the slope represents speed per time, or acceleration. On a speed-versus- time graph, if the line forms a straight line, time and speed are directly proportional to each other. The slope of the line is the vertical change divided by the horizontal change for any part of the line. On a distance-versus-time graph for a falling object, the relationship is quadratic and the curve is parabolic.
  18. 18. 4.8 Air Resistance and FallingObjects Air resistance noticeably slows the motion of things with large surface areas like falling feathers or pieces of paper. But air resistance less noticeably affects the motion of more compact objects like stones and baseballs. Air resistance can affect the acceleration of objects outside a vacuum. In many cases, however, the effect of air resistance is small enough to be neglected. With negligible air resistance, falling objects can be considered to be falling freely.
  19. 19. 4.9 Acceleration is the rate at which velocity itself changes. When we wish to specify how fast something freely falls from rest after a certain elapsed time, we are talking about speed or velocity. The appropriate equation in theses cases is v = gt. When we wish to specify how far an object has fallen, we are talking about distance. The appropriate equation is these cases is d = 1/2 gt 2
  20. 20. Concept Summary An object is moving if its position relative to a fixed point is changing. You can calculate the speed of an object by dividing the distance covered by time. Speed is a description of how fast and object moves; velocity is how fast and in what direction it moves. You can calculate the acceleration of an object by dividing the change in its velocity by time. The acceleration of an object is free fall is about 10 meters per second squared (10 m/s2).
  21. 21. Concept Summary For each second of free fall, an object falls a greater distance than it did in the previous second. On a speed-versus-time graph the slope represents speed per time, or acceleration. Air resistance noticeably slows the motion of things with large surface areas like falling feathers or pieces of paper. But aire resistance less noticeably affects the motion of more compact objects like stones and baseballs. Acceleration is the rate at which velocity itself changes.

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