he evolution of education 3.0-a movment for learning

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GETideas.org-from a Conversation on Global Education video series for education leaders. To view the accompanying video go to www.getideas.org/coge. GETideas.org is an open, online community for education leaders to collaborate and discuss key topics for education transformation

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  • [Diane to add script]
  • [This slide needs re-creating by Duarte] We all know that education is important, and increasingly so – more of that later BUT comparing international education performance is difficult. One of the best measures that we have are the OECD’s collections of statistics grouped according to internationally-comparable educational level (ISCED). This graph shows what has happened across OECD countries over the past four decades. Four things stand out: First, that all but the lowest countries have done well in catching-up; Second, that those countries at the top have improved relatively little; Third, from being 1 st , the United States is now 13 th ; finally, the gap at the top is increasingly narrowing: we are in an intensely competitive educational world.
  • [This slide needs re-creating by Duarte] We all know that education is important, and increasingly so – more of that later BUT comparing international education performance is difficult. One of the best measures that we have are the OECD’s collections of statistics grouped according to internationally-comparable educational level (ISCED). This graph shows what has happened across OECD countries over the past four decades. Four things stand out: First, that all but the lowest countries have done well in catching-up; Second, that those countries at the top have improved relatively little; Third, from being 1 st , the United States is now 13 th ; finally, the gap at the top is increasingly narrowing: we are in an intensely competitive educational world.
  • [This slide needs re-creating by Duarte] We all know that education is important, and increasingly so – more of that later BUT comparing international education performance is difficult. One of the best measures that we have are the OECD’s collections of statistics grouped according to internationally-comparable educational level (ISCED). This graph shows what has happened across OECD countries over the past four decades. Four things stand out: First, that all but the lowest countries have done well in catching-up; Second, that those countries at the top have improved relatively little; Third, from being 1 st , the United States is now 13 th ; finally, the gap at the top is increasingly narrowing: we are in an intensely competitive educational world.
  • [Duarte to rebuild] All these pressures mean that we need more and better-skilled people BUT the debate isn’t that simple This graph is from a technical economics paper from earlier this decade, but it shows a crucial point All skills are not equal: demand for their skills depends on whether people are able to undertake non-routine or only routine tasks. If you notice, routine cognitive skills actually decline faster than routine manual. So this isn’t really about which subjects you study. It’s not about STEM skills (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). It’s about people’s ability to think.
  • Codifying the 21S Case Technology roadmap and architecture (governance) Funding sources Job descriptions Grant/award methodology Ecosystem Metrics framework History Michael’s comments: Where do we do gap analysis on leadership – may want to add
  • Our vision of education has the learner fully engaged in the learning process With web 2.0 technologies there is an oppty for the learner to learn in radically different ways Teacher works as the facilitator Students work on ever increasing complex problems utilizing collaborative technologies Content can be drawn from global informal resources and Collaboration and creating is integral to the experience
  • Our vision of education has the learner fully engaged in the learning process With web 2.0 technologies there is an oppty for the learner to learn in radically different ways Teacher works as the facilitator Students work on ever increasing complex problems utilizing collaborative technologies Content can be drawn from global informal resources and Collaboration and creating is integral to the experience
  • Building Basic Capacity Is the Priority Challenge for Many Developing World Systems Education 0.5 Still to establish traditional education systems
  • Variability in Performance Is the Critical Challenge in the Developed World Education 2.0 System reform
  • There is a widely held belief that many school systems are under-performing— stuck in 20 th century thinking and unable to address 21 st century needs. It may be fairer to say that our school systems are working very hard just to keep up with the requirement pressed upon them by governments, parents and stakeholders, and few are able to break out of traditional practices and move towards the holistic system change they know is needed to become 21 st Century learning organizations. Our new president and many education leaders are stressing the need to ensure that our students --and our country --are competitive in the global economy . We know we need to prepare students for the fast moving demands of this century. To meet these challenges 21 st century collaboration and communications partnerships are a necessary component of the change we need—clearly President Obama is on board with that idea. His close relationship with his Blackberry has been the topic of countless news stories. But the tool itself is not his only or most important partner . The work done behind the scenes by government and technology partners ensures that the tool is safe, secure and yet still gives the President the connectedness he has built his reputation on. Just like the President, no school district can have the people, knowledge, or know-how to do everything they need to do to transform education . Partners are an important component of a vision for education change that we call Education 3.0. I’d like to spend a few moments talking to you in the next few slides about the big picture of Education 3.0 and why an ecosystem of partnerships is necessary to deliver a 21 st century education .
  • And speaking of partners, we at Cisco certainly do not believe that we can go it alone or set an agenda for change without your help and the input of education leaders around the world. That’s why we’ve set up a public service web site, GETideas. org, as a place for education leaders to collaborate on a new vision for change. We urge you to visit GETideas, connect with other leaders, and join the dialogue on global education transformation. And please don’t forget to register for other presentations in our series. We value your input and look forward to seeing you on GETideas.org . That concludes my presentation . We will have time now to address a few of your questions . If you have more, please feel free to click on the hand icon and type them in. Also, after the Q&A you will see a link to our very short online survey . We do value your feedback and hope that you’ll take a moment to give us your comments. Here’s the first question…
  • he evolution of education 3.0-a movment for learning

    1. 1. The Evolution of Education 3.0: Michael Stevenson Vice President Cisco Global Education A Movement for 21st Century Learning
    2. 2. Conversations on Global Education Transformation A video series for education leaders on GETideas.org An online community for education leaders
    3. 3. A World of Change in Baseline Qualifications Approximated by percentage of persons with high school or equivalent qualifications in the age groups 55 – 64, 45 – 55, 45 – 44, and 25 – 34 years United States Czech Republic Estonia Germany Switzerland Denmark Canada Norway Sweden Russian Federation4 Austria3 Slovenia Israel Slovak Republic New Zealand Hungary Finland United Kingdom Netherlands Luxembourg EU19 average OECD average France Australia Iceland Belgium Poland Ireland Korea Chile2 Greece Italy Spain Turkey Portugal Mexico Brazil2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1990s 1980s 1970s 1960s 1. Excluding ISCED 3C short programmes 2. Year of reference 2004 3. Including some ISCED 3C short programmes 3. Year of reference 2003
    4. 4. A World of Change in Baseline Qualifications Approximated by percentage of persons with high school or equivalent qualifications in the age groups 55 – 64, 45 – 55, 45 – 44, and 25 – 34 years United States Czech Republic Estonia Germany Switzerland Denmark Canada Norway Sweden Russian Federation4 Austria3 Slovenia Israel Slovak Republic New Zealand Hungary Finland United Kingdom Netherlands Luxembourg EU19 average OECD average France Australia Iceland Belgium Poland Ireland Korea Chile2 Greece Italy Spain Turkey Portugal Mexico Brazil2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 27 1 1990s 1980s 1970s 1960s 1. Excluding ISCED 3C short programmes 2. Year of reference 2004 3. Including some ISCED 3C short programmes 3. Year of reference 2003
    5. 5. A World of Change in Baseline Qualifications Approximated by percentage of persons with high school or equivalent qualifications in the age groups 55 – 64, 45 – 55, 45 – 44, and 25 – 34 years United States Czech Republic Estonia Germany Switzerland Denmark Canada Norway Sweden Russian Federation4 Austria3 Slovenia Israel Slovak Republic New Zealand Hungary Finland United Kingdom Netherlands Luxembourg EU19 average OECD average France Australia Iceland Belgium Poland Ireland Korea Chile2 Greece Italy Spain Turkey Portugal Mexico Brazil2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 13 27 1 1 1990s 1980s 1970s 1960s 1. Excluding ISCED 3C short programmes 2. Year of reference 2004 3. Including some ISCED 3C short programmes 3. Year of reference 2003
    6. 6. Facing large scale disruption In need of a bold and urgent response The Employer Demands new 21 st century skills Demands strong basic & technical skills The Learner Lives an online life Attends a disconnected classroom Education System Education Is Changing
    7. 7. Mean task input as percentiles of the 1960 task distribution. Non-Routine Interactive Non-Routine Analytic Routine Manual Routine Cognitive Non-Routine Manual How the Demand for Skills Has Changed Economy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input (U.S.) 40 45 50 55 60 65 1960 1970 1980 1990 2002 The Dilemma of Schools The skills that are easiest to teach and test are also the ones that are easiest to digitize, automate, and outsource.
    8. 8. Education 3.0: A New Vision Supported through an Adapted Reform Agenda Enabled by Technology 21 st Century Skills 21 st Century Pedagogy Achieved in Holistic Transformation Education 3.0 21 st Century Learning Education 2.0 Education 1.0 Traditional Education Systems Curriculum Teachers Accountability Leadership
    9. 9. Education 3.0 Change Model Reform 21C Skills 21C Pedagogy Technology <ul><li>Collaborative accountability </li></ul><ul><li>21C curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher quality focus </li></ul><ul><li>Model leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity & innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration & communication </li></ul><ul><li>Critical thinking & problem solving </li></ul><ul><li>Engaged student centric </li></ul><ul><li>Immersive collaborative environment </li></ul><ul><li>Digital collaborative practices </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration ready networks (V, V, D) </li></ul><ul><li>Digital learning environment </li></ul>Holistic System Transformation 21C Learning Vision Collaborative Prof Development Baseline Connectivity Enablers
    10. 10. Different from Other Reform Efforts <ul><li>·         </li></ul><ul><li>System-wide 21 St century approach </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on scalability and sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Field-tested and independently validated </li></ul><ul><li>Based on </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Best practices and thinking worldwide </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cisco experience in system change and connectivity </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Evolution of 21 st Century Learning Social Networking How Learners Best Engage Informal Content Formal Content Learner Teacher
    12. 12. 21 st Century Learning Experience Source: UNESCO ICT competency framework for teachers Team Analysis Knowledge Acquisition > Knowledge Deepening > Knowledge Creation How Learners Best Engage Collaboration Technologies Project Work Real World Interdisciplinary Teachers as Coach and Facilitator Complex Problem Solving Collaboration
    13. 13. Different Problems at Different Stages Education 0.5 Mozambique Average Years of Schooling Pupil-Staff Ratio PC Penetration per 1000 People GDP p.c. Population Aged 0–15 1 65 1 $1,105 9M 5 40 1 $3,072 351M 12 14 76 $37,267 61M Source: WDI, 2005; World Bank, 2005; Barro-Lee data set, 2000; UIS, 2005; ITU, 2004 Path to Education 3.0
    14. 14. Different Problems at Different Stages Untied States 14 13 – 15 – 32 DC Minnesota Massachusetts Alabama National Average (278) Between Countries <ul><li>Korea </li></ul><ul><li>Finland </li></ul>High Performance/ Low Spend Systems <ul><li>US </li></ul><ul><li>Italy </li></ul>Low Performance/ High Spend Systems Within Countries NAEP Scores in Grade 8 Mathematics, US 2005 Students Not College-Ready; Cost of Remediation: US$1.7B Variability *Performance = average PISA score; spend = average per student US$PPP, 2001; OECD EducatGlance, 2004; PISA, 2003 Education 2.0 Path to Education 3.0
    15. 15. “ We need to prepare our kids for the 21 st century economy by bringing our school systems into the 21 st century.” President Barack Obama The Blueprint for Change: Education http://www.barackobama.com/issues/education/
    16. 16. Thought Leadership
    17. 17. International Partnerships <ul><li>Cisco-Intel-Microsoft Assessment Alliance </li></ul><ul><li>Engagements in the US and overseas </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership Academy </li></ul>
    18. 18. A public service website for education leaders GET Informed , GET Inspired , GET Involved <ul><li>A place to GET connected and GET students ready to succeed in the 21 st century </li></ul><ul><li>Thought leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Case studies </li></ul><ul><li>Webinars </li></ul><ul><li>News </li></ul><ul><li>Videos </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul><ul><li>More </li></ul>Join the Dialogue

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