Communication Models Presentation

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Unit 1 Powerpoint presentation on Communication Models and Theories in Mr. Hill's English 9 class

Unit 1 Powerpoint presentation on Communication Models and Theories in Mr. Hill's English 9 class

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  • 1. Communication Models Unit 2: Listening & Comm. English 9 Mr. Hill
  • 2. Introduction
    • Communication, like most anything else, can be studied in order to find out exactly how it works.
    • This can be done in real life situations or it can be done on a more “academic” level.
    • This presentation will show you the three most recognized and accepted models of communication and how they work.
  • 3. MODEL #1: CONTINUOUS LOOP MODEL
    • This is the EARLIEST model of communication that has been presented and accepted by others who study the field.
    • It is also the SIMPLEST model (though it might not look like it at first).
    • It includes all of the basic parts/players in the communication process.
    • There are still a few problems, though!
  • 4. Continuous Loop Model
  • 5. Continuous Loop Model CONTENT
  • 6. Continuous Loop Model M MESSAGE CONTENT
  • 7. Continuous Loop Model M Channels MESSAGE CONTENT
  • 8. Continuous Loop Model S M Channels SENDER MESSAGE CONTENT
  • 9. Continuous Loop Model S M Info Source Channels SENDER MESSAGE CONTENT
  • 10. Continuous Loop Model S M R Info Source Channels SENDER MESSAGE RECEIVER CONTENT
  • 11. Continuous Loop Model S M R Info Source Channels Break = diff. Message received = confusion SENDER MESSAGE RECEIVER CONTENT
  • 12. Continuous Loop Model S M R F Info Source Channels Break = diff. Message received = confusion SENDER MESSAGE RECEIVER FEEDBACK CONTENT
  • 13. Continuous Loop Model S M R F Info Source Channels Break = diff. Message received = confusion SENDER MESSAGE RECEIVER FEEDBACK Break = diff info sent to Sender = improper reactions CONTENT
  • 14. CONTINUOUS LOOP
    • This model is based upon the concept that language is a system or a machine.
    • In this machine, communication acts as the “gears” for the machine to work properly.
    • Any breakdowns hurt efficiency!
  • 15. CONTINUOUS LOOP
    • While this is the EARLIEST model of communication, it is not known who the developer or the creator of the model was.
    • The only thing we know for sure is that it was most-likely developed in the 1920s or 1930s.
  • 16. CONTINUOUS LOOP
    • One of the flaws of the model is that it assumes “continuous” communication.
    • There are times when we choose to stop communicating.
    • In other words, this is good on paper, but it does not fit all situations.
  • 17. MODEL #2: SHANNON & WEAVER
    • This model was created in 1949.
    • It is not certain if this pair of researchers had seen the “Continuous Loop” model, but they were probably at least familiar with it.
    • This model was designed to be practical!
  • 18. MODEL #2: SHANNON & WEAVER
    • Just as the “Loop” model was more “academic,” the Shannon & Weaver Model is more “down-to-earth.”
    • The basis for this model was a study of telephone conversations over a very lengthy 2-year time.
  • 19. MODEL #2: SHANNON & WEAVER
    • The team studied only what they deemed to be “important” or “significant” calls of some length.
    • Quick calls to a neighbor or a store were not considered for the study.
    • The focus was on the “mechanics” of the messages.
  • 20. Shannon and Weaver Model T Transmitter = Phone
  • 21. Shannon and Weaver Model T R Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone
  • 22. Shannon and Weaver Model S T R Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone Sender = Info Source
  • 23. Shannon and Weaver Model S T R R Sender = Info Source Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone
  • 24. Shannon and Weaver Model S T R R N Sender = Info Source Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone NOISE
  • 25. Shannon and Weaver Model S T R R N Sender = Info Source Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone NOISE Static or Connection
  • 26. Shannon and Weaver Model S T R R N Sender = Info Source Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone NOISE Static or Connection Mental or Electronic
  • 27. Shannon and Weaver Model S T R R N ? Sender = Info Source Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone NOISE Static or Connection Mental or Electronic
  • 28. Shannon and Weaver Model S T R R N ? Sender = Info Source Transmitter = Phone Receiver = Phone Altered Message = Confusion NOISE Static or Connection Mental or Electronic
  • 29. MODEL #3: BERLO’S “MODEL”
    • This is the MOST RECENT model of communication study.
    • An exact date is not given for the study, but it is believed to have been completed in the late 1970s or the early 1980s.
    • This one is not designed to be “academic” or “practical.” It is designed to be “ALL-INCLUSIVE”
  • 30. MODEL #3: BERLO’S “MODEL”
    • Even with all of the good things that this “model” illustrates and tries to describe, there is still one little issue to remember…
  • 31. MODEL #3: BERLO’S “MODEL”
    • IT’S NOT REALLY EVEN A TRUE MODEL IN THE FIRST PLACE!
  • 32. MODEL #3: BERLO’S “MODEL”
    • It is NOT a model because it was never actually tested.
    • Berlo designed what he thought would be the ideal system to describe communication, but never had a chance to put it to the test in real life.
  • 33. MODEL #3: BERLO’S “MODEL”
    • Since it was never “field-tested,” the “model” that Berlo developed has to take on a new title…
  • 34. MODEL #3: BERLO’S “MODEL”
    • IT HAS TO BE CALLED A “THEORY”
  • 35. Berlo’s Listening Theory
  • 36. Berlo’s Listening Theory CONTENT
  • 37. Berlo’s Listening Theory CONTENT CODE
  • 38. Berlo’s Listening Theory CONTENT CODE Sender: Emotions Knowledge Background Biases Ability
  • 39. Berlo’s Listening Theory CONTENT CODE Sender: Emotions Knowledge Background Biases Ability Receiver: Emotions Knowledge Background Biases Ability