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  • 1. http://www.<lickr.com/photos/naum/1639496461/
 Rebooting
Britain
Alan
Moore
SMLXL
 Straight
 line The
true
possibilities
of
the
networked
society
 
 
thinking
stops
here!


  • 2. http://picapixels.tumblr.com/post/110371277/85945961‐jpg
 The
real
voyage
of
 discovery
is
not
to
seek
 new
landscapes

  • 3. It
is
indeed
to
look
upon
 the
world
with
fresh
eyes
 Image::
http://picapixels.tumblr.com/post/112642547/460954095‐jpg

  • 4. So
come
with
me
on
a
short
journey,
and
 it
all
starts,
with
a
friend
of
mine.
Steve
 Watts
is
a
wealthy
Californian
 businessman.
Recently
he
decided
he
 would
take
his
family
on
holiday
to
 Europe.
He
decided
that
it
would
be
a
 good
idea
to
travel
en‐familie
throughout
 Europe,
by
train.
Indeed,
an
elegant
way
 to
travel
he
thought,
along
straight
tracks
 and
clockwork
like
schedules
avoiding
 the
trials
and
tribulations
of
air
and
car
 travel.
His
children
implored
him
to
take
 this
opportunity
to
read
the
Harry
Potter
 books,
as
they
thought
he
would
really
 enjoy
them,
as
indeed
they
had
done.
 Steve
decided
that
he
would
leap
into
the
 digital
age
–
buy
the
latest
iPod,
and
 upload
Harry
Potter
books
as
audio
<iles.

  • 5. Donning
the
iconic
white
headphones
as
the
8am
from
Rome
to
Turin
moved
out
of
the
 station,
Steve
looked
out
of
the
train
window
and
began
to
take
in
the
scenery
and
the
stories
 of
Harry
Potter.
At
the
end
of
the
week,
sitting
down
to
breakfast,
Steve
announced,
much
to
 the
horror
of
his
children
that
he
thought
Harry
Potter
was
severely
over
rated
–
well
in
fact
 more
than
just
over
rated,
Harry
Potter
was
just
plain
rubbish.
His
kids
looked
perplexed.
 Obviously
his
children
disagreed,
so,
Steve
explained
that
there
was
no
structure,
no
plot
line,
 and
the
characters
came
and
went
in
random
order,
constantly.

  • 6. Steve’s
kids
picked
up
his
iPod
and
looked
at
it
and
then
they
laughed
–
in
fact
 they
laughed
until
they
were
in
tears,
much
to
the
consternation
of
their
father.
 Why?
Because
Steve
had
been
listening
to
Harry
Potter
all
week
on
Shuf<le.
Steve
 did
not
get
Shuf<le
and
so
this
simple
everyday
story
sits
at
the
very
heart
of
No
 Straight
Lines.
Because
for
many
of
us,
we
have
only
ever
experienced
a
linear
 life
and
a
linear
culture,
Steve’s
inability
to
comprehend
even
the
possibility
of
 Shuf<le
is
a
simple
but
telling
example
of
that
fact.
 http://www.<lickr.com/photos/34478983@N00/237139242

  • 7. Carlota
Perez
in
her
 book
Technological
 Revolutions
and
 Financial
Capital
–
 says
that
there
 comes
a
point
in
 time
where
the
old
 institutions
are
 found
wanting,
the
 old
frameworks
 insuf<icient.


  • 8. http://picapixels.tumblr.com/post/113185311/1241888829265462‐jpeg
 Let me explain A
linear
 
approach
to
what
we
 
make,
how
we
make
it,
who
we
 
make
it
with,
how
we
share
and

 communicate
is
a
framework
if
you
will,
or
a
lens
 
that
sets
us
to
look
upon
our
world
and
act
in
a
very
particular
 fashion.
Shuf<le
is
an
example
of
a
non‐linear
approach,
a
means
 by
which
we
can
access,
curate
and
interpret
the
world
in
a
 different
way.
But
for
some
is
very
hard
to
grasp.

  • 9. http://picapixels.tumblr.com/post/115662173/good‐morning‐situ‐gunung‐ii‐by‐juhe‐jpg
 Think
about
it
like
this
– 
 
the
only
straight
lines
made
in
nature
are
made
by
man, 
 
and
similarly
our
industrial
world
has
been
built
with 
 
the
same
straight‐line
logic
 
 and,
philosophy.
Yet
nature
is
not
like
that,
 
 it
has
no
straight
lines. 
 
Nature
<lows,
nature
is
more
connected,
grass
roots
and
interdependent.
 
 It
suggests
a
different
type
of
process
and
logic
at
play
that
is
not;
 
 centralized,
bureaucratic
or
in<lexible.

 This
is
the
world
of
no
straight
lines. 

  • 10. http://www.<lickr.com/photos/greentrench/179501134/
 For
straight‐line
thinkers
the
world
of
no
 straight
lines
is
akin
to
living
in
a
foreign
 land;
the
customs,
language,
symbols
etc.,
 are
dis‐lo‐cating‐ly
alien
–
they
are
 outsiders,
unable
to
fully
participate,
as
 they
do
not
have
the
comprehension,
nor
 the
insight,
or
the
necessary
capability
to
 fully
engage.
They
have
become
concussed
 observers
to
the
vital
world
around
them.
 The
visceral
shock
however,
is,
that
this
is
 happening
to
us,
not
in
some
foreign
land,
 but,
in
their
own
backyards.

  • 11. Our
world
of
business,
media,
and
communications
is
evolving
from
the
straight‐lines
of
an
 industrial
era
to
the
more
complex
and
networked
world
that
mimics
nature.

 This
interactive
networked
world
isn’t
about
vertical
silos,
traditional
notions
of
product
and
 service
creation,
mass‐production
and
mass
media
and
marketing.
It
is
about
the
massive
 <lows
of
people,
who
are
connecting,
collaborating,
organising
and
creating
in
a
manner
that
 has
nothing
to
do
with
a
linear
approach
too
much
at
all.
This
is
truly
an
engaged
and
 participatory
culture.
 Yochai
Benkler
in
the
Wealth
of
Networks
argues
that
for
over
150
years
our
economies,
 culture
and
society
have
been
shaped
by
a
straight‐line
logic
producing
considerable
economic
 success.
However,
in
the
dawn
of
the
Networked‐Society,
a
straight‐line
logic
of
getting
stuff
 done
becomes
a
barrier
to
progress.
Why?
Because,
the
change
wrought
by
the
networked‐
 society
is
structural
–
challenging
how
markets
and
organizations
have
co‐evolved
over
the
last
 150
years.
 The
highest
and
best
form
of
ef1iciency
is
the
 spontaneous
cooperation
of
free
people.

 Woodrow
Wilson

  • 12. http://www.<lickr.com/photos/14431773@N08/3512241035
 Communication - Community - Communion This
creates
a
dilemma.
And
the
dilemma
is
this
–
How
can
<irms
and
the
people
 that
work
in
those
<irms,
develop
coherent
strategies/products
and
services
that
 are
premised
upon
No‐Straight‐Line
principles
–
when
they
have
been
versed
only
 in
Straight‐Line
thinking
–
at
least
for
the
over
35’s
–
from
birth?

  • 13. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lewishamdreamer/1523495713/ There
are
no
such
things
as
conscripts
‐
there
are
only
volunteers,
says
Euan
 Semple,
he
says
young
people
are
coming
into
traditional
organizations
having
 spent
the
entirety
of
their
young
lives:
collaborating,
networking
and
getting
stuff
 done
in
very
different
ways.
They
are
confronted
with
an
alien
world
of:
linearity,
 silos,
hierarchies
and
the
ego
of
title.
The
friction
is
palpable
because
the
old
 organizational
models
cannot
cope
with
or
take
full
advantage
of
the
new
 potential,
unleashed
is
a
profound
transformation
in
the
way
of
doing
things,

 of
getting
stuff
done.

  • 14. Make
no
mistake
–
we
are
currently
in
the
midst
of
a
communications
revolution
–
 and
once
you
have
stormed
the
Bastille
you
don’t
go
back
to
your
day
job.
 We
are
at
the
barricades
<ighting
for
a
participatory
culture
as
the
modern
world
 has
stripped
us
humans
down
to
units
of
education,
production
and
consumption.
 
 In
fact
we
want
to,
recover
something
of
the
spirit
of
the
Enlightenment
on
terms
 appropriate
to
our
time.
And
this
is
what
Reboot
is
all
about:
whether
its
Lee
 Bryant
talking
about
People
Power,
Andy
Hobsbawm
looking
at
how
we
create
 Social
Good
from
Social
Media,
Tom
Steinberg
giving
us
a
real
alternative
vision
of
 a
participatory
and
transparent
Democracy
–
through
mySociety,
Paul
Miller
 offering
us
a
vision
as
to
how
we
can
collaborate
and
innovate
together
better.
We
 want,
No
we
demand
the
shared
ability
to
connect
to
other
citizens
on
common
 ground.
Because
we
have
become
victims
of
the
rules
we
all
live
by.
Replace
every
 member
of
Parliament
but
ask
them
to
work
within
the
current
system
–
and
you
 will
get
exactly
the
same
outcome
–
It’s
a
system
breakdown.
 Communications
technology
can
be
wielded
as
a
powerful
agent
of
social
and
 political
change,
today
it
is
being
wielded
with
great
might
and
great
ferocity.

  • 15. We
have
turned
away
from
a
Read
Only
 In
the
age
of
mass
media,
the
press
was
 to
a
Read
Write
culture
–
Nokia
says
 able
to
de<ine
the
sphere
of
legitimate
 25%
of
all
media
will
be
created
by
us
 debate
with
relative
ease
because
the
 by
2012
–
YouTube
uploads
13
hours
of
 people
on
the
receiving
end
were
 audio‐visual
material
every
minute
of
 atomised

but
connected
“up”
to
Big
 every
single
day
of
the
year.
This
is
folk
 Media
but
not
across
to
each
other.
And
 culture
for
the
21st
Century
–
albeit
on
 now
that
authority
is
eroding


says
 steroids.
 Journalism
Professor
Jay
Rosen
 communicationstransformation

  • 16. http://www.<lickr.com/photos/42526951@N00/255187152
 But
what
is
driving
this
communications
revolution?
 Is
it
that
technology
has
just
appeared?
Is
it
a
<luke?
An
accident?
 The
simple
answer
to
that
is
no.
Technology
is
a
human
creation
 in
the
<irst
place
and
it
succeeds
or
not
the
the
extent
that
it
 meets
fundamental
human
needs,
human
beings
have
an
innate
 need
to
connect
and
collaborate,
through
communal
and
 cooperative
activity
we
<ind
context
and
meaning
in
our
lives.

 Right
now,
we
are
directing
communications
technology
to
 achieve
very
speci<ic
things
for
society.
As
Carl
Jung
said….

  • 17. “I”
 
 Needs 
 
“We”


 to
truly
be
 
“I” 

  • 18. Noisy
ghosts
in
the
machine
called
life
 But
our
industrial,
mass
media,
mass
consumer
society,
strips
us
of
what
 makes
us
who
we
are
–
we
have
become
units
of
production
and
consumption,
 battery
farmed,
and
raised
in
a
world
where
we
feel
little
personal
 accountability
to
each
other.
We
have
deconstructed
humanity
almost
to
the
 http://www.woostercollective.com/2008/09/fresh_stuff_from_dan_in_bristol_uk.html
 point
of
destruction
–
sceptical
!?
Ask
any
practicing
psychologist
who
will
tell
 you
of
the
very
complex
psychological
problems
many
people
have
as
they
 struggle
to
construct
their
identities.

 Sadly
many
of
us
have
become
very
noisy
ghosts
in
the
machine
called
life.
In
 the
UK
Every
3
in
5
people
suffer
or
have
suffered
from
a
mental
health
 problem
 The
crisis
of
our
modern
age
is
the
crisis
of
meaning,
these
are
the
deep
 drivers
to
what
all
the
speakers
at
Reboot
are
concerned
with
–
what
Reboot
 directs
you
to
is
how
we
can
rediscover
our
sense
of
ourselves
and
in
doing
so
 –
Reboot
Britain.

  • 19. Image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/camil_t/82015664/ “Human
nature
is
not
a
machine
to
be
built
after
a
model,
and
set
to
do
 exactly
the
work
prescribed
for
it,
but
a
tree,
which
requires
to
grow
and
 develop
itself
on
all
sides,
according
to
the
tendency
of
the
inward
forces
 which
make
it
a
living
thing.”
 
John
Stuart
Mill
–
On
Liberty
1859

  • 20. A
new
commonsense
for
the
networked
society
 http://www.<lickr.com/photos/nathaninsandiego/2723981272/
 Participatory
culture
–
folk
culture
for
the
21st
Century
 In
a
late
medieval
carnival,
for
example,
everyone
had
a
role
to
play
and
a
chance
to
distinguish
 themselves
individually
by
the
brilliance
of
their
costumes,
the
wittiness
of
their
jokes,
or
their
 talents
as
dancers
or
athletes.
Barbara
Ehrenreich
in
her
book
Dancing
in
the
Streets,
a
history
 of
collective
joy,
says
that
the
capacity
for
collective
joy
is
encoded
into
us
almost
as
deeply
as
 the
capacity
for
erotic
human
love
of
one
human
for
another.
We
can
live
without
it,
as
most
of
 us
do,
but
only
at
the
risk
of
succumbing
to
the
solitary
nightmare
of
depression,
argues
 Barbara
Ehrenreich.
Today,
the
most
prescribed
drugs
in
the
world
are
those
for
depression.
 We
want
to
co‐create,
share,
collaborate
together
in
this
way
we
<ind
common
meaning.

  • 21. HOS
 http://www.we‐make‐money‐not‐art.com/archives/2008/05/erika‐larsen‐for‐the‐past.php
 













Human
































Operating




























System
 The
Open
Society
 George
Soros
worried
deeply
that
unfettered
capitalism
was
creating
a
closed
society
which
only
one
 thing
counted
–
material
success.
He
argued
for
an
open
society
a
new
type
of
operating
system
that
 was
not
built
upon
market
fundamentalism,
dogma
and
avarice.
I
would
argue
this
is
what
we
might
 call
a
Human
Operating
System.
This
social
operating
system
looks
beyond
materialism
to
something
 greater
‐
to
liberate
us
from
closed
systems
so
that
we
can
all
re‐engage
with
the
world
to
feel
and
be
 accountable
to
each
other
and
experience
and
enjoy
the
richness
of
life

  • 22. http://picapixels.tumblr.com/post/110384580/picapixels‐tumblr
 @
Reboot
we
are
showing
each
other
what
this
Open
Society
really
means
 systems,
platforms
and
services
that
enable
people
to
better
cooperate
together,
 more
effectively
and
enjoyably.

We
go
from
faster
to
closer
–
from
context
to
 deeper
context.
And
as
John
Thackara
says
a
culture
of
community
and
 connectivity
has
to
be
fun
as
well
as
challenging,
as
well
as
responsible.

 The
“open
society”
is
created
by
the
unfolding
of;
ideas,
language
and
creativity
 that
brings
us
new
ways
of
describing
and
comprehending
our
world.


  • 23. The
Open
Society
should
NOT
JUST
SATISFY
US.
No
it
should
 inspire
us. 

  • 24. http://www.<lickr.com/photos/9266144@N02/1075722366/
 I
want
to
share
some
words
with
you
that
I
want
you
to
re<lect
upon
and
in
doing
so
to
think
 about
what
do
these
words
suggest
as
possibilities
to
you?
And
perhaps
as
you
spend
your
day
 with
us
all
@
Reboot
apply
this
language
to
your
company,
your
organisation
and
imagine
what
 that
language
means?

  • 25. lightweight 

  • 26. <lexible
 

  • 27. adaptive

  • 28. creative
 commons 

  • 29. open
source

  • 30. deep
context 

  • 31. life‐long
 learning 

  • 32. embedded
 sociability

  • 33. individual
&
 collective
 accountability 

  • 34. mobile

  • 35. grassroots 

  • 36. craftmanship

  • 37. permeable
 <lows
of
 information 

  • 38. blended
reality

  • 39. networked
 economics

  • 40. collaborative
 &

 participatory

  • 41. social
 innovation

  • 42. i
+
we

  • 43. networked

  • 44. trust
 &
 transparency

  • 45. shared
 collective
joy

  • 46. read
&
write

  • 47. collective
 intelligence 

  • 48. mashable

  • 49. hyper‐local 
 &
 superglobal

  • 50. technologies
 
 of
 
 cooperation

  • 51. understands
 the
morality
of
 “enough”

  • 52. Co­creation
 The
co‐creation
of
culture
and
the
sharing
of
culture
creates
social
cohesion.

 Collaboration,
participation,
co‐creation

  • 53. http://www.<lickr.com/photos/21526856@N00/2345518579
 Craftsmanship
in
the
networked
society
 Social
philosopher,
Richard
Sennett's
book
The
Craftsman,
is
an
exploration
 into
the
idea
of
craftsmanship,
he
begins
from
the
basics
of
technique
and
 personal
expression
and
applies
that
to
a
philosophy
of
how
craftsmanship
 might
be
at
the
very
heart
of
social
good
in
modern
society.
It
is
Sennett's
 contention
that
“nearly
anyone
can
become
a
good
craftsman”
and
that
 “learning
to
work
well
enables
people
to
govern
themselves
and

so
become
 good
citizens.”
This
line
of
thought
depends,
among
other
things,
upon
the
 Enlightenment
assumption
that
craft
abilities
are
innate
and
widely
distributed,
 and
that,
when
rightly
stimulated
and
trained,
they
allow
craftsmen
to
become
 knowledgeable
public
persons.”
The
craftsman
is
more
than
just
a
good
 technician
he
is
a
bringer
of
peace
and
a
maker
of
civilisation,
he
uses
his
 tools
for
the
collective
good.


  • 54. Embedded
Sociability
 Every
single
case
history
and
proposition
at
Reboot
actually
has
sociability
 implicitly
embedded.
Reboot
recognises
embedded
sociability
as
part
of
the
 DNA
of
the
networked
society
–
it
is
a
fundamental
requirement.
 http://www.<lickr.com/photos/an_untrained_eye/1195966967/

  • 55. Permeability
of
organisations
 organisations
need
to
be
 permeable,
with
the
ability
 to
absorb
<lows
of
 information,
and
people.

 This
means
using
more
 transparent
methods
of
 communication
from
inside
 http://www.<lickr.com/photos/powerhouse_museum_photography/2862345500/
 out
and
outside
in.

 It
also
means
being
<lexible
 and
adaptive,
more
organic
 in
thought
and
deed.
 http://picapixels.tumblr.com/post/113152317

  • 56. People
have
lived
and
worked
in
villages
since
the
dawn
of
civilization.
The
corporation,
argues
Charles
 Handy,
is
a
youthful
concept,
little
more
than
a
century
old.
One
could
argue,
too,
that
the
notion
of
a
lively
 village
—
with
its
unabashed
humanity
—
is
a
more
appropriate
way
to
look
at
what
the
corporation
 should
be
in
the
21st
century
than
the
constrained
and
impersonal
entity
it
has
been.

 Villages
are
small
and
personal,
and
their
inhabitants
have
names,
characters,
and
personalities.
What
 more
appropriate
concept
on
which
to
base
our
institutions
of
the
future
than
the
ancient
organic
social
 unit
whose
<lexibility
and
strength
sustained
human
society
through
millennia?
 http://www.flickr.com/photos/krustysplodge/898377791/ The
organisation
as
a
village

  • 57. http://www.woostercollective.com/2008/08/bruno_taylors_playful_spaces.html
 We
don’t
take
back
the
public
realm
by
more
CCTV
‐
Trying
to
control
the
public
 domain
remotely
is
never
going
to
work.

Why
is
it
in
Japan
that
you
can
leave
 your
bicycle
left
unlocked
in
down
Tokyo
–
because
society
has
a
powerful
sense
 of
the
inter‐relationship
between
society
–
the
public
realm
and
the
individual.
 http://www.<lickr.com/photos/38435718@N00/264462892
 Creating
community
is
only
marginally
about
technology.
What
matters
is
the
 emergence
of
shared
meaning
as
we
interact
with
each‐other
in
meaningful
 activities…
For
hundreds
of
years,
when
the
majority
of
the
population
was
 illiterate,
participatory
ritual
and
performance
were
the
main
ways
that
beliefs
 were
shared
within
a
culture.
 Taking
back
the
public
realm

  • 58. The
learning
age
 Stephen
Heppell
considers
the
21st
century
to
herald
the
‘learning
age’.

 In
the
20th
century,
he
argues,
we
built
big
things
(railways,
universities)
 but
the
focus
for
the
21st
century
is
‘helping
people
to
help
each
other’.

 In
his
view,
“The
old
stuff
won't
do
any
more”.
 The
four
Cs
are
Heppell's
key…


  • 59. Learning
should
be
a
 {1}
 part
of
all
our
lives
–
 an
open,
living
 Creating breathing
system
 where
intelligence
 and
knowledge
is
 shared
and
 distributed
–
 
 {3} 
 {2} 
 Collaborating
 Critiquing
 {4}

 
 Communicating

  • 60. Deschooling
business
schools
–
a
new
capitalism
 http://www.<lickr.com/photos/delibelli/279319214/
 Contrary
to
popular
opinion
–
business
is
in
fact
a
social
science
–
so
perhaps
our
business
 schools
should
be
more
like
this
–
the
Eden
project
The
promise
of
this
new
world
cannot
 come
about
until
education/business
/politics
etc.,adjusts
to
human
need
not
the
other
way
 around
by
connecting
people
with
common
interests,
unlocking
creative
talent
among
 groups
that
have
a
passionate
interest
or
an
desire
to
exchange
information
globally,
and

 as
a
consequence
new
content
and
solutions
emerge.

 I
believe
that
by
offering
collaborative
tools
for
innovation
at
the
grass
roots
we
dramatically
 increase
productivity
because
as
I
have
pointed
out
a
simple
truth
people
embrace
what
they
 create.

  • 61. The
effervescent
 beauty
of
systems
 thinking
 Straight
Line
Thinkers
also
fail
to
think
of
the
whole
system
or
pathway
of
help,
which

leads
 instead
to
focusing
on
bits
of
the
system,
with
the
result
that
although
each
bit
may
be
doing
 its
bit,
the
overall
result
is
awful,
as
one
part
clashes
against
another.

 John
Seddon,
argues
that
this
dynamic
is
currently
endemic
in
Britain’s
public
sector
leading
 to
valueless
activity,
meaningless
measurement,
and
ever
poorer
service,
at
ever
greater
cost.
 You
and
I
as
taxpayers
are
paying
heavily
for
this
stupidity.
The
solution,
Seddon
advocates
 is
a
Systems
Thinking
approach
where

[1]
individuals
come
<irst,

[2]
waste
is
reduced

 [3]
responsibility
replaces
blame.

It's
an
approach
that
is
proven,
successful
and
relatively
 cheap
‐
and
one
that
governments
around
the
world,
and
their
advisers,
need
to
adopt
urgently.
 It
is
the
difference
between
effectiveness
vs.
ef<iciency

  • 62. simplexity
 We
create
complexity
by
not
thinking
through
solutions
de<ined
by
simple
 human
principals.
This
is
as
relevant
to
our
daily
lives
as
individuals
and
as
 professionals.
We
forget
to
look
beyond
the
obvious
and
step
back
from
 situations
to
enable
us
to
alter
our
preconceptions
of
taking
and
making
 solutions.

And
by
doing
so,
we
tumble
into
complexity
 

  • 63. One
of
the
ways
to
simplexity
is
through
the
Bill
Bailey
 principle.
Bill
is
a
comedian
and
he
is
asked
how
he
comes
 up
with
his
jokes
 The
Bill
Bailey
Principle

  • 64. Bill
says
–
well
I
start
with
a
laugh
and
works
backwards.
 What
do
I
need
to
do
to
create
that
about
of
laughter!!
 Where
we
start
to
think
about
solving
problems
will
 determine
where
we
end
up.

  • 65. James
Dyson
started
by
asking
a
question
and
focused
there
after
on
<inding
the
 very
best
answer
/
experience
to
that
question.
His
focus
was
on
effectiveness
 not
ef<iciency.
Funny
that
–
he
also
has
50%
of
the
vacuum
cleaner
market
–
 globally.

 But
we
also
see
the
same
approach
for
MyPolice
and
in
there
is
a
suggestion
of
 a
completely
different
approach,
a
process
that
provide
very
different
results.

  • 66. I
suggest,
that
rather
than
<iddling
around
with
bits
of
the
system,
we
raise
our
eyes
and
 minds
upwards
and
yearn
for
the
vast
endless
sea
of
possibility
of
what
our
society
could
 be
beyond
the
con<ines
of
Straight
Line
thinking
–
Embrace
and
use
daily
what
Howard
 Rheingold
rightly
describes
as
“Technologies
of
Cooperation”.

 What
you
call
things
is
important,
as
I
have
also
explained,
we
need
a
new
language
and
 framework
to
enable
to
us
to
succeed
as
a
society,
and,
we
need
to
put
commerce
in
its
 rightful
place
within
the
human
fabric
of
the
networked
society.
 We
need
a
system
reboot
into
a
new
social
paradigm.
As
Richard
Sennett
argued
in
the
 Craftsman
 We
want
to,
recover
something
of
the
spirit
of
the
Enlightenment
on
terms
appropriate
to
 our
time.

 We
may
need
a
form
of
dualism
for
a
while,
understanding
that
we
are
in
the
process
of
 making
a
journey,
spiritually,
socially,
and
economically
from
one
way
of
seeing
and
 behaving
in
the
world
to
another.

The
source
of
the
solution
lies
in
<inding
once
again
the
 ‘being’
in
human
being.
The
fundamental
need
we
have
is
to
<ind
shared
meaning,
because
 without
such
communal
meaning
or
belonging,
we
become
bricks
in
the
wall,
living
 meaningless
lives.
 We
need
to
Reboot
the
system
and
we
need
to
Reboot
it
now.

  • 67. SMLXL:
 Contact:
alanm@smlxtralarge.com 
 Twitter:
alansmlxl 
 www.smlxtralarge.com
 Thank
you
 http://icanread.tumblr.com/post/85622811/via‐inothernews