Ipac march 20 2014
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    Ipac march 20 2014 Ipac march 20 2014 Presentation Transcript

    • The Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council Institute of Public Administration of Canada Annual General Meeting March 20, 2014 The Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council Institute of Public Administration of Canada Annual General Meeting March 20, 2014
    • The WPRC a multi-sector roundtable of community leaders from business, all levels of government, and the non-profit sector. …thought leaders and influencers with diverse views from differing sectors, who are driving innovation in areas important to this community. Strong representation from all sectors – including business leaders - is a priority.
    • Dave Angus President & CEO Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce Joy Cramer Deputy Minister Housing & Community Development, Province of Manitoba Cynthia Foreman Co-Chair Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council Heather Grant-Jury Director UFCW Training Centre Sande Harlos Medical Officer of Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Health Susan Lewis President & CEO United Way of Winnipeg Charles Loewen President & CEO Loewen Windows Co-Chair Winnipeg Poverty Reduction Council Marilyn McLaren Board Chair Manitoba Public Insurance Diane Roussin Director Winnipeg Boldness Project Jan Sanderson Deputy Minister Children & Youth Opportunities, Province of Manitoba Clive Wightman Director Community Services, City of Winnipeg Steering Committee Members
    • Council Members: • Provide advice on specific questions, open doors for the WPRC and carry specific messages; • Lend their names in support of the WPRC mandate to significantly reduce poverty through collaboration, innovation and integrated services; • Consider opportunities to put their personal and/or organizational resources behind WPRC’s initiatives; • Influence collaboration and poverty reduction initiatives within their organizations and networks; and • Attend periodic events organized by WPRC for learning and strategic discussion
    • The Council believes that as a community, we are rich with people and programs but we would have greater collective impact, if we did more to connect, align and reinvent our systems. The Council believes that as a community, we are rich with people and programs but we would have greater collective impact, if we did more to connect, align and reinvent our systems.
    • Homelessness
    • For most, homelessness is short & happens once 88 to 94% (176,000 to 188,000) transitionally homeless 3 to 11% (6,000 to 22,000) episodically homeless 2 to 4% (4,000 to 8,000) chronically homeless ©Copyright CAEH. All rights reserved 9 Focus is on those who require intervention to end their chronic/episodic homelessness while preventing others from becoming chronically/episodically homeless  Provisionally Accommodated, those whose accommodation is temporary or lacks security of tenure  Emergency Sheltered, those staying in overnight shelters for people who are homeless, as well as shelters for those impacted by family violence  Unsheltered, or absolutely homeless and living on the streets or in places not intended for human habitation
    • The Business Case  The cost of homelessness includes direct costs such as shelters and services, as well as indirect costs, such as increased use of health services, policing and the criminal justice system (Gaetz).  In 2007, the annual cost of homelessness in Canada was estimated to be between $4.5 to 6 billion, including all costs associated with the provision of emergency services by community organizations, governments and non- profits (Laird).  In one U.S. study (Larimer et. al) Housing First participants had total monthly costs of $4066 per person in the year prior to the study. Monthly costs decreased to $1492 per person after 12 months in housing. 10
    • ©Copyright CAEH. All rights reserved11
    •  Calgary - 11.4% decrease from 2008 to winter 2012.  Edmonton - 30% decrease from 2008 to 2012.  Fort McMurray - 42% decrease from 2008 to 2010.  Lethbridge - 64% decrease in overall homelessness and a 93% reduction in street homelessness since 2008.  Vancouver - a 66% reduction in street homelessness since 2008.  Toronto - a 51% decrease in street homelessness since 2006.  Fredericton - a 30% reduction in emergency shelter use It is possible to end homelessness. ©Copyright CAEH. All rights reserved 12
    • Toward a Long Term Plan to End Homelessness  A 15 member volunteer Task Force representing all sectors  Guided by 5 Indigenous Elders  Over 80 people who are or who have been homeless offered their voice  6 subgroups (prevention, person-centred system of care, housing supply, measurement, governance, action plan)  Public consultations on key themes and involving all sectors  Countless meetings and conversations 13
    • The Process Getting organized and oriented to the issue January 2013 SeptJuneApril January 2014 Focus groups with PWLE Elders’ Council Elders’ Council Elders’ Council Elders’ Council Sub Groups- Prevention, System of Care, Housing and Data Engagement sessions Engagement - Private sector Preliminary Plan Strategic Consultations  All levels of government  Indigenous Peoples and Organizations  Private sector  Community organizations April Sub Groups – Governance and Action Plan 14
    • Long Term Goals and Strategies: To move from managing homelessness to ending homelessness 1. Prevent homelessness 2. Create a person-centred system of care with a range of “Housing with Supports” options including Housing First 3. Increase the supply of housing 4. Measure and better understand what we do. 15
    • Early Childhood Development
    • Title of Your Presentation 4A further explanation of what your presentation is going to be about Monday, January 1, 2012 | Author’s Name | Committee or Department prepared for 17 .
    • Title of Your Presentation 4A further explanation of what your presentation is going to be about Monday, January 1, 2012 | Author’s Name | Committee or Department prepared for 18 .
    • Manitoba has the HIGHEST rate of child placement outside the home – potentially – in the world.
    • BOLD Province of Manitoba, Business Council of Manitoba, Chamber of Commerce, J.W. McConnell Foundation of Canada, United Way and others
    • Social Impact Bonds Instrument for funding projects where a pre-arranged amount of money is paid out if performance results are achieved. a) private investors provide the up-front capital to fund social interventions and; b) assuming targets are met, the investors expect to receive both their initial investment and a financial return. Transfer the risk of failure from the government to the private financial backers of non-profits and outcome based social services.
    • • Early childhood is a time of both great promise and considerable risk. The physical, cognitive and socio-emotional development of a young child is fostered –or impeded –by multiple factors that shape the experiential landscape of the early years. The Boldness Project
    • • Early childhood is a time of both great promise and considerable risk. The physical, cognitive and socio-emotional development of a young child is fostered –or impeded –by multiple factors that shape the experiential landscape of the early years. The Boldness Project
    • A research & development partnership between the community of Point Douglas and some of Canada’s leading thinkers and practitioners in the area of large-scale social change, early childhood development and social finance. The Boldness Project will be physically situated in the Point Douglas community. The Boldness Project