Technology Enhanced Learning
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Technology Enhanced Learning

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  • 1. Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Cranfield University June 2014 http://cranfieldtel.brookesblogs.net/2014/05/29/technology-enhanced-learning/ OCSLD
  • 2. Indicative Agenda • 0930 Introduction • why, how • 1030 Coffee • 1045 Identify a short learning activity • 1115 Select appropriate TEL tools • 1130 Detailed activity planning • 1200 Lunch • 1230 Develop the components of the activity • 1315 Integrate elements; prepare presentation • 1345 Presentations • 1430 Evaluate the activities
  • 3. INTRODUCTION 0930
  • 4. Aims Propose solutions to common problems such as: • Students living off site need extra support between modules and have difficulty getting to campus • Students who have English as an additional language may want additional opportunities to hear sessions delivered early in the course • Students would like to attend a research seminar which clashes with a teaching session • Students want more opportunities to receive formative feedback
  • 5. Outcomes for today’s session • Plan, produce and distribute a short learning activity in your discipline using academic multimedia and readily available ICT (smart phones, tablet computers, etc) • Identify readily available Web-based tools - particularly those used by your university - for multimedia production, distribution and collaboration and evaluate their utility for the creation and implementation of learning activities • Explore opportunities for integrating data and applications from more than one web service to create a unified teaching resource • Select a variety of approaches for teaching and student support to cater for different learning styles and a diverse student cohort
  • 6. The main task • Identify a short learning activity relevant to your current teaching practice and discipline that could be enhanced through the use of at least two online multimedia services • Write at least one well-formed intended learning outcome for the activity
  • 7. Options If you have prepared a Blackboard site for Module 1 • Enhance that site with with a short (<3 min) video introducing the site/module and personalising it If you have not undertaken this activity • Sketch a short online learning activity using available TEL tools, and mock up the activity
  • 8. Baseline TEL We talk of technology enhanced learning (TEL) but do not often analyse the elements. • Technology • Enhanced • Learning
  • 9. Baseline 1: Technology What do we mean by “Technology” •Computer aided collaborative learning – distributed collaboration, working together •Online •Academic multimedia – Video – Audio – Hypertext (Web pages)
  • 10. Baseline 2: Enhanced “Enhancement” suggests measurement. •What is the scale? •What are the criteria? What is enhancement when applied to learning?
  • 11. Baseline 3: Learning • Process • Product • Change • Transformation
  • 12. Transformation 1 • Opening up a new way of thinking about something without which the learner cannot progress • As a consequence there may be a transformed internal view of subject matter, subject landscape, or even world view (Meyer and Land 2003, 1).
  • 13. Transformation 2 • People experience a disorienting dilemma which leads to a deep structural shift in their world-view • The learners’ susceptibility to transformation will depend on where they are prepared to take themselves, the self-imposed boundary of risk
  • 14. Transformation 3 • TEL has been treated as pragmatics: techniques for increasing the availability of content to help with catching up or revision, or extending teaching without transforming it. • Digital literacy as an attribute of competence - the bare minimum necessary to operate in society - is giving way to responsibility to determine where and how it should be used in a disciplined and transforming way.
  • 15. TEL as transformation • How might TEL be a disorienting dilemma which leads to a shift in our world-view?
  • 16. Underpinnings • Activity, we do or make things in groups, using tools, with acceptable practices (criteria) and different roles • Experience, self-evaluative, practitioner-centered, pragmatic - what works - drawing on your own and your students’ experience • Dialogue, we talk synchronously and asynchronously with people • Reflection, brings experience into scholarly evidence through four professional "lenses": self, students, colleagues, the literature • Participatation, tutors engage as and with learners • Community, disciplines, institutions, others, work, the world and society • Outcomes, curriculum and aims, externally approved and may contribute towards professional recognition.
  • 17. Wider aims: good practice • encourage student-tutor contact • encourage student-student co-operation • encourage active learning • give prompt feedback • emphasise time on task • have and communicate high expectations • respect diverse talents and ways of learning (Chickering & Gamson, 1987) independent of the mode of engagement
  • 18. Bloom + Kolb knowledge comprehension application synthesis evaluation ATHERTON J S (2005) Learning and Teaching: Bloom's taxonomy [On-line] UK: Available: http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/bloomtax.htm Accessed: 11 June 2007 analysis
  • 19. BREAK 1030
  • 20. IDENTIFY THE LEARNING ACTIVITY 1045 OCSLD
  • 21. Cranfield TEL
  • 22. Public web-based tools
  • 23. Public web-based tools • Slideshare • Google drive • YouTube • …
  • 24. http://inewsdesign.com/2012/11/26/programming-for-non-geeks-publishing-multimedia-on-the-web/
  • 25. Scope • What do we mean by “short”? • What do we mean by “two online multimedia services”?
  • 26. Proposed example activities • Inventory management, taking into account customer needs, resources, business objectives c. 3 hours face-to-face • How to get started on an MSc thesis • A module with 3 activities, has 1-hour online lecture: Introduction to electronic warfare • Military vehicles: contrast the requirement sets and the job the vehicle has to do focus on Challenger, T62 • Introduction to the sport of free diving
  • 27. Examples FSLT & TOOC First steps into learning and teaching in higher education Teaching online open course
  • 28. Key considerations • Will this activity be part of a face-to-face or a Distance Learning course? • How will you introduce collaboration? – Student-student interaction • Group work • Discussion • Peer evaluation • Etc? • How will the students use TEL? • Accessibility – Ease of use
  • 29. DETAILED ACTIVITY PLANNING 1115
  • 30. LUNCH 1200
  • 31. DEVELOP THE COMPONENTS OF THE ACTIVITY 1230
  • 32. INTEGRATE ELEMENTS AND PREPARE PRESENTATION 1315
  • 33. PRESENTATIONS 1345
  • 34. EVALUATE THE ACTIVITIES 1430
  • 35. Underpinnings • Activity, we do or make things in groups, using tools, with acceptable practices (criteria) and different roles • Experience, self-evaluative, practitioner-centered, pragmatic - what works - drawing on your own and your students’ experience • Dialogue, we talk synchronously and asynchronously with people • Reflection, brings experience into scholarly evidence through four professional "lenses": self, students, colleagues, the literature • Participatation, tutors engage as and with learners • Community, disciplines, institutions, others, work, the world and society • Outcomes, curriculum and aims, externally approved and may contribute towards professional recognition.
  • 36. Wider aims: good practice • encourage student-tutor contact • encourage student-student co-operation • encourage active learning • give prompt feedback • emphasise time on task • have and communicate high expectations • respect diverse talents and ways of learning (Chickering & Ehrman, 1987) independent of the mode of engagement
  • 37. CLOSE 1500
  • 38. Thank you Dr George Roberts Senior Lecturer Educational Development groberts@brookes.ac.uk