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  • 1. George Man Urban Design & Masterplanning Portfolio
  • 2. Designed by George Lau Waiming Man, 2013 19 Monmouth Road, Hayes, UB3 4JQ, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)20 8573 0736 Mob: +44 (0)7905 170936 E-mail: georgelwman@yahoo.co.uk
  • 3. Contents Middle East Experience King Abdullah International Gardens (KAIG) | Saudi Arabia...........................4 King Abdullah City for Atomic & Renewable Energy | Saudi Arabia............12 Salam Park Extension | Saudi Arabia...............................................................18 United Kingdom Experience Leyton Mills Retail Park Redevelopment | London..........................................28 Ebbsfleet Valley Masterplan | Kent.....................................................................32 South Acton Estate Regeneration Masterplan | London.................................34 Colindale Hospital Site Redevelopment | London............................................36 Waverley Business Park Masterplan | Sheffield...............................................38 Norwich City Centre Conservation Area Appraisal | Norwich......................40 Flitwick War Memorial| Flitwick, Bedfordshire................................................44 China Experience Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Masterplan | Haiyan, Zhejiang.......................48 Beifeng Phase 1 Landscape Design | Quanzhou, Fujian.................................52 Beitun New City Masterplan | Xinjiang..............................................................54 Fuhai New City Masterplan | Xinjiang...............................................................56
  • 4. Middle East Experience
  • 5. 4 King Abdullah International Gardens (KAIG) | Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 2007 - 2011 Barton Willmore Client: Riyadh Municipality http://www.kaig.net Winner of the international design competition for a botanic garden in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Cityscape 2010 winner and CNBC award. With the environment increasingly on the world agenda, the concept behind the crescent-shaped biomes is to raise awareness of the impending crisis of climate change by telling the story of the palaeobotanical evolution of the site in time, through a series of gardens, representing the Devonian to the Pliocene eras. The final garden, the Garden of Choices, shows how climate change will affect the environment. I was involved from the design development stage right through to the tender stage under the direction of Nick Sweet, the project director. BEST INTERNATIONAL LEISURE DEVELOPMENT King Abdullah International Gardens by Barton Willmore / Buro Happold 2010 Best Sustainable Development 2010 Best Sustainable Development REAL ESTATE MENA REAL ESTATE MENA
  • 6. 5 At the design development stage I created coloured plans and sections for many of the individual gardens, with building layouts supplied from the architecture team and our joint-venture engineering partner Buro Happold. The Paleobotanic Crescent Gardens plan (right), which has featured in many news and magazine articles around the world, was put together by me, with input from the architects and others in the team. Competition Stage Design Development Stage Tender Stage Legend 1. Devonian Garden 2. Carboniferous Garden 3. Jurassic Garden 4. Cretaceous Garden 5. Cenozoic Garden 6. Family Garden 7. Pliocene Garden 8. Garden of Choices 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  • 7. 6 Paleobotanic Gardens - Main Crescent Building With CAD drawings supplied by the Architecture team I produced coloured sections and elevations of the main Paleobotanic Crescent building. The walls are coloured pale brown to show that the cladding used will be made from the desert rock excavated on-site.
  • 8. 7 Physic Garden Apart from the main Paleobotanic display the site has extensive external gardens. At this stage of the design I was charged with developing some of them further, including the Physic Garden. In addition to my existing knowledge of Photoshop, my AutoCAD skills were acquired quickly during this stage.
  • 9. 8 Garden of Sound & Light The Garden of Sound & Light is also one of the external gardens. I produced two sections to emphasize the theme of light: one showing the garden in the daytime; the other at night-time.
  • 10. 9 At the tender stage I coordinated the construction drawing sets, both A0 and A3 hardcopies and on DVDs, among all the consultants in the joint-venture, under the supervision of the project manager Orlando Bayne-Powell, for submission to the client. There were several submission packages, which enabled the client to check progress. In the submission packages I contributed to many of the CAD sections and plans, showing hardscape, setting out, levels and planting, as well as the landscape details. My dedication to the project even extended to personally packaging the A0 drawings into cardboard tubes and delivering them to the Cargo Terminal at Heathrow Airport for the flight to Riyadh, on several occasions. Competition Stage Design Development Stage Tender Stage
  • 11. 10 For the tender stage, many of the drawings produced at the design development stage were developed further. For the Maze Garden I produced planting, level, hardscape and setting out plans, as well as sections.
  • 12. 11 In addition to the main A0 drawing sets an A3 landscape details set was produced by my colleague Tracey McLaughlin and I. Over 100 drawings are included in the A3 package. All A0 landscape drawings are referenced to the relevant landscape details.
  • 13. 12 King Abdullah City for Atomic & Renewable Energy (KA-CARE) | Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 2010 Barton Willmore Client: Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia http://www.kacare.gov.sa One of twelve teams invited by the Saudi Government to design a world-leading sustainable community with the research and development of alternative energy technologies for the nation at its core. Our team’s approach was to promote ‘organic urbanism’ as the key vision for the site, catering for a population of 65,000 who live, work and study on-site and reducing the need to travel outside. Two main settlements were proposed, the lowland settlement where large format production and distribution facilities will be housed and the uplands settlement where corporate headquarters would be sited. I was involved throughout the competition, providng research and analysis of the site in the beginning, right through to the preparation of the final PowerPoint presentation and InDesign report.
  • 14. 13 Riyadh Today Riyadh - Future Growth Strategic Approach Towaiq National Park Concept The team started off with analysis of the site’s surroundings. I investigated the relationship between the site and Riyadh city. Together we developed the concept the Towaiq National Park, which encompasses the KA-CARE site, in additional to King Abdullah International Gardens (KAIG). This helps promote KA-CARE as a leisure destination and a desirable place to live and work.
  • 15. 14 Access & movement Slopes with gradient 1:2 to 1:3 Enhance wadi landscape Preserve existing stormwater course Retain and enhance escarpment Direction of stormwater discharge Protected views All site constraints An analysis of the site was conducted, highlighting the various constraints and opportunities that the site has. The conclusion is that the hilly terrain is difficult to build on, particularly the slopes. The escarpment should be protected and enhanced, whilst potential views from the high points should be protected and exploited.
  • 16. 15 A simplified masterplan shows the various components. The gross floor area pie chart shows the project’s intention of a mixed-use community, where residents live, work and play in the same place, thus reducing the need to travel. This contrasts with the zoning approach that separates functions and enourages commuting, particularly by car. Masterplan Areas Total Gross Floor Area
  • 17. 16 Upland Villages Large format single-storey production and distribution facilities in addition to the research and development functions more closely associated with the ‘heart’ of KA-CARE on the upland. The larger format employment functions are conceived as a ‘cracked earth’ concept, allowing the roofs to be insulated with the most appropriate material possible: the desert scree, or gravel, that the scheme springs from. The upland villages are scaled to fit the ‘fingers’ of upland area that avoid intrusion into the stormwater run-off system. This approach also respects the need to preserve and enhance the attractions and ecology of the existing environment, aiming to ensure that over-development does not occur. Lowland CommunityUpland Community A sustainable mixed-use development serving up to 25,000 people, offering all of the constituent functions of a balanced community and hosting the Heart of KA-CARE: the headquarters, conferencing, research and development functions of the principal organisation on the site. The masterplan is divided into three areas: the Upland Community, Lowland Community and the Upland Villages. The Upland and Lowland communities are the core settlements of the masterplan, while the Upland Villages are individual residential communities located on top of the valleys, which afford good views.
  • 18. 17 I put together the final PowerPoint presentation, comprising all the analysis, concepts and masterplan. The presentation also included a 5 minute video, explaining the ‘organic’ nature of the development. Sustainability is at the core of the KA-CARE proposals. Our engineering partner Ramboll provided input, with site-wide sustainability strategies. I created these sustainability strategy diagrams and ensured that the followed our diagrams in terms of graphic consistency. Energy strategy Water supply strategy Transport strategy Waste water strategy
  • 19. 18 Salam Park Extension | Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 2010 - 2011 Barton Willmore Client: Arriyadh Development Authority http://www.ada.gov.sa The 33 hectare site is one of the few public spaces in Riyadh and is highly popular with families. This prestigious scheme aims to extend and enhance Riyadh’s main municipal park and provide better connections with the surrounding area. A new entrance plaza, axial promenade and and central spire landmark form the basis of the proposals, along with a new wilderness garden and other smaller attractions. Beginning at the design development stage of the project, my role expanded greatly at the tender stage, where I greatly contributed to the contruction drawings.
  • 20. 19 Concept Development Stage Design Development Stage Tender Stage I was brought in at the design development stage in a small capacity where I created coloured site-wide sections. The drawings were incorporated into the final A3 report for submission to the client. the final design of salampark.
  • 21. 20 The top section is the Wilderness Garden, which aims to be a wetland oasis for birds and thus will be surrounded by trees. The section below shows the axial promenade and shows how the entrance plaza is linked to the central spire landmark.
  • 22. 21
  • 23. 22 I was heavily involved at the tender stage where I helped coordinate the construction drawing sets, both A0 and A3 hardcopies. The landscape details package was divided between myself and my colleague Tracey McLaughlin. My experience from KAIG greatly aided me during this project, not only in the use of CAD, but also the management of drawing sets. As previously in the KAIG project I was responsible for several of the individual gardens. Each garden had a set of hardscape, setting out, planting and levels plan, as well as section. Concept Design Stage Design Development Stage Tender Stage
  • 24. 23 Water Play & Adventure Garden - Section Garden of Giants - Section
  • 25. 24 The landscape details package was a set of A3 drawings, which was divided between myself and Tracey. All hardscape plans have references to the relevant landscape detail drawing in this package. All detail drawings come with notes and dimensions.
  • 26. 25
  • 27. United Kingdom Experience
  • 28. 28 Leyton Mills Retail Park Redevelopment | London, United Kingdom 2010 Barton Willmore Client: Land Securities The proximity of Leyton Mills Retail Park to the London Olympic Park provides an opportunity to create a pedestrian link between Leyton and the Olympic stadium, along with a redevelopment of the site. Proposals included new homes above retail units and a central public space on a podium, creating a vibrant new community. The pedestrian link to the Olympic site, along with improved public realm, would increase accessibility to the site.
  • 29. 29 Option 2 Option 1 Apart from the long-term redevelopment plans, I produced public realm studies, showing two options for temporary improvements in time for the 2012 London Olympics.
  • 30. 30 A11 A12 A12 A11 SITE 2 Zone A Stratford New Town Zone B Leyton Zone C North Leyton/ Lea Bridge N O R T H E R N O L Y M P I C F R I N G E Stratford Stratford International DLR under construction Bow Church Bow Road Pudding Mill Lane Stratford High Street Under construction Abbey Road Under construction West Ham DLR under construction Maryland Hackney Wick Homerton Leyton Midland Road Leytonstone High Road Leyton Leytonstone Hackney Marshes Victoria Park RiverLea RiverLea RiverLea River Lea River Lea Mabley Green Clapton Park STRATFORD BOW WEST HAM PLAISTOW HACKNEY HOMERTON HACKNEY WICK LOWER CLAPTON OLD FORD LEYTONSTONE MILE END RiverLea O L Y M P I C P A R K Key Main pedestrian routes (proposed) Secondary pedestrian routes (proposed) The Leyton Mills scheme falls within the joint planning framework of the London Boroughs of Newham and Hackney, due the area’s proximity to the the Olympic Park in London’s East End. Planning Context Existing Site Analysis Land Ownership
  • 31. 31 Level 0 Level 3 Level 1 Level 4+Level 2 Several options were developed, including the one shown here. The main concept was a mixed-use podium development with shopping on the lower levels, supporting several apartment towers. A bridge across the railway line to the Olympic Park was also envisaged. Key
  • 32. 32 Ebbsfleet Valley Masterplan | Kent, United Kingdom 2009 - 2011 Barton Willmore Client: Land Securities The location of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link station at Ebbsfleet has created an enormous opportunity to regenerate this largely industrial part of north Kent. The international station lies at the heart of the planned new town of 420 hectares in size, with the Fast Track guided bus system connecting with Bluewater Shopping Centre and the wider area. The proposed mixed-use development will have 9 million square feet of office, retail, leisure and community space. Combined with 10,000 new homes, this new vibrant community will allow residents to live minutes away from their place of work. With an international rail service to continental Europe, the promoters of the development intend to attract multinational companies to locate at Ebbsfleet.
  • 33. 33 George has worked on and off the Ebbsfleet project, including a site visit. At the later stages various options were developed for the business quarter, following research of precedent office developments, including BA Waterside and Chiswick Park.
  • 34. 34 South Acton Estate Regeneration Masterplan | London, United Kingdom 2010 Barton Willmore Client: London Borough of Ealing Design competition to regenerate the run- down and disconnected South Acton Estate in West London. Shortlisted to the final stages by the London Borough of Ealing. The overall masterplan & landscape strategy provides a series of legible safe neighbourhoods which reconnects South Acton with the high street and the nearby tube and overground stations and local buses. A new community hub will be located at the centre of three new parks providing activities and meeting spaces for all ages and members of the local community. Local residents, schools and community groups have been involved throughout the consulation process. I have worked throughout the stages of the process, including site analysis drawings through to CAD layouts with different house types; street and parking standards were adopted from the DfT’s Manual for Streets publication.
  • 35. 35 Green spaceConnections Community facilities Views and legibility Public transport Land use The proposals seek to repair the connections through the estate, creating new green spaces in the process.
  • 36. 36 Colindale Hospital Site Redevelopment | London, United Kingdom 2007 - 2008 Barton Willmore Client: Fairview Homes Redevelopment of the 5 hectare Colindale Hospital site with a high quality sustainable scheme comprising of 735 new homes, a healthcare facility, an aparthotel, retail and commercial space, a new transport interchange and a public square. High quality public realm is one the key principles of the development. I have worked on the public realm sections, illustrating the nature of proposed spaces in the development, particularly the central square.
  • 37. 37 Shared Surface Section Central Square Section
  • 38. 38 Waverley Business Park Masterplan | Sheffield, United Kingdom 2008 Barton Willmore Client: Helical Governetz and UK Coal Plc http://www.waverleycommunity.com This former 300 hectare mining site in South Yorkshire will be transformed into a new sustainable community with 4,000 new homes along with shops, schools, leisure facilities and offices. Our team worked on the development of the business park quarter, Highfield Commercial, which offers 60,000 square metres of high quality offices which seeks to attract government and civil service occupants. The buildings will adopt BREEAM standards in line with the development’s sustainble principles. Site analysis plans, which I produced, illustrate the constraints of the site, highlighting the topographical and ground constraints of this former mining site. Access to the site also shows the site’s relative isolation from the surrounding area. Topography Ground conditions Pedestrian and cycle routes Bus routes Vehicular routes Site location A618 A630A57 A57 A57 A61 A630 A61 A6102 33 M1 M1 M1 M18 32 31 Rotherham Sheffield Site Central Handsworth Woodhouse Swallownest Treeton Catcliffe Rother Valley Lake River Rother River Don Darnall Meadowhall Kiveton Bridge
  • 39. 39 Proposed Building Heights Proposed Vehicular Routes Proposed Public Transport Routes Proposed Pedestrian Routes Proposed Cycle Routes Proposed Land Use The masterplan elements were explained through a series of diagrams showing land use, building heights and access routes, all of which I illustrated.
  • 40. 40 The Norwich City Centre Conservation Area Appraisal was commissioned by Norwich City Council, and went out to public consultation from February to June 2007. The area covers the city of Norwich within the historic city walls. This two-part document begins with an assessment of the Conservation Area at the strategic city level, outlining the architectural history, public realm and building materials typical of Norwich, as well as strategic landmarks and vistas. Strategic management guidelines were suggested to maintain and enhance the heritage of the city as a whole. The second part of the document outlines more detailed analysis and guidance at the neighbourhood level. This was dealt with by dividing the Conservation Area into ‘character areas’, picking out buildings, public realm, open spaces and other features which make a positive contribution, as well as those which detract from the built environment. Each character area has detailed management guidelines for future development. My role began with background research prior to starting the project and a site visit throughout much of the city centre, taking photos and extensive notes on a map marking out important features which feature in the character area assessments. Much of the map work was carried out by me. Norwich City Centre Conservation Area Appraisal | Norwich, United Kingdom 2006-2007 QuBE Planning Ltd Client: Norwich City Council
  • 41. 41 PAGE 4 // NORWICH CITY CONSERVATION AREA APPRAISAL Height (metres) Mousehold Heath RiverWensum Ber Street escarpment Castle St. Benedict’s Street KingStreet St. Crispin’s Road MagdalenStreet Bishopgate Pottergate Prince of Wales Road ChapelFieldRoad Tombland RouenRoad Colegate Fishergate OakStreet St. Stephen’s Street St.Augustine’s Street DukeStreet Queen’s Road BerStreet St. Giles Street Gas Hill St. James Hill Height in metres 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 The underlying geology of Norwich is chalk (with flint and occasionally sand- stone deposits) though glacial sand and gravel up to 7m thick form terraces in the river valley bottom. There are two areas of relatively high ground; Mousehold Heath to the north and east and the Ber Street escarpment to the south and west which forms a prominent and quite steeply wooded ridge be- tween Rouen Road and King Street. Norwich is a surprisingly hilly city. Streams (known locally as ‘cockeys’), with their own small valleys, fed the River Wensum and although they have now been culverted and some levelling has taken place over the years, their influence remains in the line of streets such as Red Lion and White Lion Streets. Mousehold Heath is an extremely important element of the city’s setting and one which features heavily in the work of English land- scape painters. The heath is the remnant of a broad tract of land which ran eastwards as far as South Walsham. The wooded slopes at the western end of the heath can be seen from the City Centre Conservation Area. In the C18, Thomas Fuller described Norwich as ‘either a city in a orchard or an orchard in a city…’ and the city today continues to enjoy a well-wooded setting with over 200 acres of publicly-owned woodland within the city boundary. The ridges, created by the cutting of valleys by the Rivers Yare and Wensum, are generally well wooded and are particularly important to the setting of the city centre. Within the central area, the River Wensum is the most important natural feature. Land adjacent to the river was marshland during Saxon times. The area around the Cathedral Close remains a functional flood plain today and so is not highly developed. Even where the river is more tightly lined by buildings, there are often groups of good mature trees lining the banks which enhance the appearance of both the river and the buildings along it and make walks beside the river particularly pleasant. The City Centre has several parks, open spaces and school recreation grounds which contribute greenery and open space. In addition, most of the historic churches in the city centre have churchyards. Although many of these are quite small, they often contain mature trees and provide green oases in otherwise tightly-defined streets. Around the edge of the city centre, some o the stretches of surviving city wall also have attractive green settings which are useful in visual and amenity terms. Just as important to the character of centra Norwich as the greenspaces are the ‘plains’ These vary in scale from the recently laid- out Millennium Plain to St Catherine’s Plain TOPOGRAPHY & LANDSCAPE Topography & Landscape Topography The document begins with the planning and location context, followed by topography and landscape of Norwich, which is the result of my research and mapwork. Topography PAGE 5 / 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 9 (Finkelgat former se widened s roads or j of church of narrow important a location TOPOGRAPHY & LANDSCAPE Public spaces and plains 1. Anglia Square 2. St. Martin at Palace Plain 3. Tombland 4. St. Andrew’s Hall Plain 5. Market Place 6. Millennium Plain 7. Hay Hill 8. Orford Hill 9. Chapelfield Shopping Centre Key open spaces 10. St. Martin’s at Oak Wall Lane 11. Gildencroft 12. Playground 13. Space adjacent to Fye Bridge Street 14. Riverside Walk 15. Lifes Green 16. The Cloisters 17. Upper Close 18. Lower Close 19. James Stuart Garden 20. Riverside Walk 21. Riverside Walk 22. Castle Meadow 23. Chapelfield Gardens 24. The Wilderness Playing fields 25. Hospital Meadow 26. St Helen’s House 27. Green Yard 28. Tennis Courts 29. The Close 30. St. Catherine’s Hill Wooded slope 31. Richmond Hill Public spaces and plains Key open space Playing fields Wooded Slopes Landscape Landscape 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 13 22 23 30 9 TOPOGRAPHY & LANDSCAPE Public spaces and plains 1. Anglia Square 2. St. Martin at Palace Plain 3. Tombland 4. St. Andrew’s Hall Plain 5. Market Place 6. Millennium Plain 7. Hay Hill 8. Orford Hill 9. Chapelfield Shopping Centre Key open spaces 10. St. Martin’s at Oak Wall Lane 11. Gildencroft 12. Playground 13. Space adjacent to Fye Bridge Street 14. Riverside Walk 15. Lifes Green 16. The Cloisters 17. Upper Close 18. Lower Close 19. James Stuart Garden 20. Riverside Walk 21. Riverside Walk 22. Castle Meadow 23. Chapelfield Gardens 24. The Wilderness Playing fields 25. Hospital Meadow 26. St Helen’s House 27. Green Yard 28. Tennis Courts 29. The Close 30. St. Catherine’s Hill Wooded slope 31. Richmond Hill Public spaces and plains Key open space Playing fields Wooded Slopes Landscape PAGE 1 // NORWICH CITY CONSERVATION AREA APPRAISAL INTRODUCTION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 River Yar e River Wens um B1108 A140 A147 A140 A47 River Yare The Norwich City Centre Conservation Area was created in October 1992 to cover the whole of the city within the medieval city walls. Previously separate Conservation Areas covered different parts of the area; the first being designated in 1970 and various modifications have been made to the boundary as recently as 2003. There are 16 other Conservation Areas within the Norwich City Council administrative area. Conservation Areas are defined as ‘areas of special architectural or historic interest, the character and appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance’. When a Conservation Area is designated, the Council has a duty to ‘draw up and publish proposals’ for its preservation and enhancement. This document aims to fulfil that duty. Norwich has a unique character which is a product of its location and history. The first part of this document therefore summarises the issues which have influenced Norwich’s form and considers the key characteristics which define the city we see today. Key Issues and Guidelines are then set out to show the key characteristics that will be maintained and enhanced. The Conservation Area covers over 230ha (570 acres). Within the boundary are several distinct ‘character areas’. These are identified in this document and their special characteristics defined. Policies and proposals for the specific management of each character area are then provided. 1. City Centre 2. Bracondale 3. Newmarket Rd 4. Heighham Grove 5. Thorpe 6. Sewell 7. Eaton 8. Trouse 9. Earlham 14. Thorpe Ridge 15. Unthank & Christchurch 16. Hellesdon Village 17. St Matthews 10. Old Lakeham 11. Bowthorpe 12. Mile Cross 13. Thorpe Hamlet Introduction Norwich stands at the heart of East Anglia and is a major regional city with a population of 200,000. The presence of the Rivers Wensum and Yare was at the heart of the city’s early development allowing it to flourish as a trading centre particularly with the Low Countries. Today the rivers link into the Norfolk Broads waterway network and bolster Norwich’s increasing popularity as a tourist destination. Norwich’s economy was originally based on the woollen industry and the city developed as a regional service provider for the rural hinterland. By the C18 a number of manufacturing industries developed including shoemaking and, later, iron foundries. Several companies such as Colmans, and Boulton and Paul became household names; the former becoming the largest employer in the city in the late C19. Norwich today is well-known for its financial services though these too have their origins in the C18. Whilst many of LOCATION & CONTEXT Riv erYare River Wensum Great Yarmouth NorwichSwaffham Cromer Norfolk Broads Lowestoft Thetford Diss Cambridge, London (via M11) A140 A47 A47 A140A11 Location & Context Conservation Areas in Norwich Location Height (metres) Mousehold Heath RiverWensum Ber Street escarpment Castle St. Benedict’s Street KingStreet St. Crispin’s Road MagdalenStreet Bishopgate Pottergate Prince of Wales Road ChapelField Road Tombland RouenRoad Colegate Fishergate OakStreet St. Stephen’s Street St.Augustine’s Street DukeStreet Queen’s Road BerStreet St. Giles Street Gas Hill St. James Hill Height in metres 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 The underlying geology of Norwich is chalk (with flint and occasionally sand- stone deposits) though glacial sand and gravel up to 7m thick form terraces in the river valley bottom. There are two areas of relatively high ground; Mousehold Heath to the north and east and the Ber Street escarpment to the south and west which forms a prominent and quite steeply wooded ridge be- tween Rouen Road and King Street. Norwich is a surprisingly hilly city. Streams (known locally as ‘cockeys’), with their own small valleys, fed the River Wensum and although they have now been culverted and some levelling has taken place over the years, their influence remains in the line of streets such as Red Lion and White Lion Streets. Mousehold Heath is an extremely important element of the city’s setting and one which features heavily in the work of English land- scape painters. The heath is the remnant of a broad tract of land which ran eastwards as far as South Walsham. The wooded slopes at the western end of the heath can be seen from the City Centre Conservation Area. In the C18, Thomas Fuller described Norwich as ‘either a city in a orchard or an orchard in a city…’ and the city today continues to enjoy a well-wooded setting with over 200 acres of publicly-owned woodland within the city boundary. The ridges, created by the cutting of valleys by the Rivers Yare and Wensum, are generally well wooded and are particularly important to the setting of the city centre. Within the central area, the River Wensum is the most important natural feature. Land adjacent to the river was marshland during Saxon times. The area around the Cathedral Close remains a functional flood plain today and so is not highly developed. Even where the river is more tightly lined by buildings, there are often groups of good mature trees lining the banks which enhance the appearance of both the river and the buildings along it and make walks beside the river particularly pleasant. The City Centre has several parks, open spaces and school recreation grounds which contribute greenery and open space. In addition, most of the historic churches in the city centre have churchyards. Although many of these are quite small, they often contain mature trees and provide green oases in otherwise tightly-defined streets. Around the edge of the city centre, some of the stretches of surviving city wall also have attractive green settings which are useful in visual and amenity terms. Just as important to the character of central Norwich as the greenspaces are the ‘plains’. These vary in scale from the recently laid- out Millennium Plain to St Catherine’s Plain TOPOGRAPHY & LANDSCAPE Topography & Landscape Topography 10 23 TOPOGRAPHY & LANDSCAPE Public spaces and plains 1. Anglia Square 2. St. Martin at Palace Plain 3. Tombland 4. St. Andrew’s Hall Plain 5. Market Place 6. Millennium Plain 7. Hay Hill 8. Orford Hill 9. Chapelfield Shopping Centre Key open spaces 10. St. Martin’s at Oak Wall Lane 11. Gildencroft 12. Playground 13. Space adjacent to Fye Bridge Street 14. Riverside Walk 15. Lifes Green 16. The Cloisters 17. Upper Close 18. Lower Close 19. James Stuart Garden 20. Riverside Walk 21. Riverside Walk 22. Castle Meadow 23. Chapelfield Gardens 24. The Wilderness Playing fields 25. Hospital Meadow 26. St Helen’s House 27. Green Yard 28. Tennis Courts 29. The Close 30. St. Catherine’s Hill Wooded slope 31. Richmond Hill Public spaces and plains Key open space Playing fields Wooded Slopes Landscape
  • 42. 42 Map 6 - 2006 figure ground Map 5 - 1905 figure ground Holmstrete Southgate Colegate St.Faith’sLane Sandgate Skeythgate Holgate Hoystergate Pottergate Berstrete Conesford Gate King Street Gate Berstrete Gate Swinemarket Gate The Brazen Doors Nedham Gate St Stephen’s Gate Newport Gate St Gile’s Gate Coslanye Gate St Martin’s Gate St Augustine’s Gate Fybriggate Gate Magdalen Gate Barregate Gate Pockthorpe Gate Fybriggate Snailgate Muspolgate Gildencroft Westwyk Gate St. Benedict’s Gate Castle Cathedral Grey Friars Great Hospital Austin Friars Chapel in the field White Friars Norman’s Hospital Black Friars provision market Cow Tower Helgate Heigham Gate Bishop Gate Fishergate Black Tower Tombland Boom Towers Medieval Norwich My research also tracked the development of Norwich through the ages, from Roman and Medieval to modern times. Figure ground analysis diagrams reveal the extent of the changes to the urban morphology of the Colegate area. Much of the changes were due to post-war rebuilding and the construction of St Crsipin’s Road as part of the ring road. This has led to the lose of architectural character. Bishop Bridge St.Faith’sLane FRENCHBOROUGH Holmstrete Fishergate Berstrete Colegate Cowgate Southgate Fybriggate Sandgate Castle Cathedral Market Place Tombland Music House Norman Town Road Marshland New Norman settlements Existing Saxon settlements Jewish quarter Church Norman Town Bishop Bridge St.Faith’sLane FRENCHBOROUGH Holmstrete Fishergate Berstrete Colegate Cowgate Southgate Fybriggate Sandgate Castle Cathedral Market Place Tombland Music House Norman Town Road Marshland New Norman settlements Existing Saxon settlements Jewish quarter Church Colegate Area 1905 Colegate Area 2006
  • 43. 43 According to the methodology established by the team, we divided tbe Conservation Area into Character Areas, each of which was analysed according to several criteria. Elm Hill & Maddermarket - Appraisal Map Elm Hill & Maddermarket - Buildings Map
  • 44. 44 A follow-up report with proposals for landscaping improvements to the town square. The previous report recommended locations in the town which would most benefit from improvements. The square is a prominent landmark in the town which is where the war memorial is located. Landscape improvements include new paving, grass areas and new trees. Flitwick War Memorial | Flitwick, Bedfordshire, United Kingdom 2006 QuBE Planning Ltd Client: Flitwick Town Council Bowling Green 5 3 95 3 1 4 2 1 2 4 Church Works THE AVENUE Bank Ramp, steps and wall Cashpoint Pole Cobbles Slabs Cobble & Concrete tiles (600mm x 600mm) Concrete slabs Red brick Concrete Kings Road StationRoad Benches Litter bin Bollards 0 2 4 6 8 10 metres Not to scale Chain link fence
  • 45. 45 This project was one of the earliest where I used Sketchup, giving the opportunity to develop and refine my skills in this area.
  • 46. China Experience
  • 47. 48 Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant Masterplan | Haiyan, Zhejiang, China 2012-2013 Tianhua Client: Qinshan Nuclear Power Ltd As part of China’s ambitious plans to build and expand nuclear power production, Qinshan Nuclear Power Ltd held a competition to develop the front entrance at its nuclear power plant with new offices and dormitories for its maintenance workers, and partly redevelop another site some 8 kilometers away in Haiyan Town which houses the main dormitories for its permanent workers. Our submission took a holistic and integrated approach to both sites, combining work, living and tourism. For the main site new offices, a campus and a wetland park were proposed, while additional housing and new canalside public realm were to be located at the residential site.
  • 48. 49 典型核电站的功能 Functions of a Typical Nuclear Power Plant 核岛 常规岛 ·反应堆厂房 ·燃料厂房 ·安全保卫厂房 ·核辅助厂房 ·通道厂房 ·放射性废物厂房 ·热洗衣厂房 ·热机修车间、仓库及 去污厂房 ·柴油发电机厂房 ·流出物罐 ·汽轮机厂房 ·电气厂房 ·气体绝源开关设备 厂房 ·变压器厂房 核电厂配套设施 ·冷却水泵房 ·消防泵房 ·除盐水厂房 ·辅助锅炉厂房 ·氢储存设备 ·氧储存设备 ·化学品储存设备 运营服务中心 ·办公楼 燃气及辅助厂房 ·临时乏燃料储存设备 ·临时中放废物储存设备 ·低级废物中间集结区 辅助建筑 ·主要通道建设 ·访问控制建筑 ·辅助行政中心 ·食堂 ·医学中心 ·公共信息中心 ·培训中心 电网变电站 ·气体绝源开关设备大堂 ·继电器室 ·设施建筑 Qinshan Nuclear Power Group Masterplan & Design Strategies 180秦山核电有限公司厂区行政区方案设计 I carried out research around the general requirements of nuclear power stations and also about the local area, all of which informed the rationale behind the project. Qinshan local context Typical nuclear power plant layout
  • 49. 50 统一总图 可居住地带 可居住地带 居住北区 草地及沿海开放 式空间及设施 山坡、森林及 湿地开放式空 间及设施 居住南区 入口广场 整合规划 公共空间 重建潜力区 提供开放的空 间和现场设施 景观缓冲地带 功能性绿色 空间 有活动的开放 式公共空间 被动式绿色 空间 分区规划 配套设施 行政区 宿舍区 开发式空间 及景观暖冲地带 整合规划 分区规划 配套设施 行政区 宿舍区 开发式空间 及景观暖冲地带 道路交通 73 道路交通 73 One of the key strategies was integrate the power plant with the local communities and surroundings without compromising safety and security. The creation of a Coastal Campus is part of a waterfront route for visitors to enjoy, while the Wetland Park, which is located outside the security zone, is open to the park. Coastal Campus - key principles Wetland Park - key principles
  • 50. 51 Sustainability strategies include rainwater harvesting and using solar power to provide hot water.
  • 51. 52 Beifeng Phase 1 Landscape Design | Quanzhou, Fujian, China 2013 Tianhua Client: China Vanke Following Tianhua’s successful completion of the overall masterplan, the company was commissioned to design the landacape of one of the blocks. A swimming pool for adults and one for children lie at the centre of the podium garden, catering for residents. For this project I illustrated site sections and other drawings for the design development stage.
  • 52. 53
  • 53. 54 Beitun New City Masterplan | Xinjiang, China 2007 - 2009 Barton Willmore Client: Altay Prefecture Government Located in a remote part of north west China, the local government seeks to transform this frontier town into a major landlocked ‘port’ for transporting goods through China to its neighbouring Central Asian countries. Under the proposals the population will increase from 30,000 to 250,000 and is proscribed in China’s 5 year National Plan. The scheme aims to achieve 60% renewable sources of energy, including hydro-electricity and wind power, and 10% water recycling. The proposals seek to exploit the site’s proximity to neighbouring Kanas Lake, with its outstanding scenery, to launch an eco-tourism strategy for the region. I was involved at the early stages of the project, assisting in the strategic planning.
  • 54. 55 Topographical context Proposals in planning context Landscape strategy I provided research and analysis of Beitun and its location in region.
  • 55. 56 Fuhai New City Masterplan | Xinjiang, China 2009 - 2011 Barton Willmore Client: Altay Prefecture Government Following our work on the Beitun masterplan, we were commissioned to conceive an overall masterplan for the neighbouring city of Fuhai, including regeneration of the old town and a new urban extension. Covering 48km² with a projected population of 300,000, it aims to be a centre of industry, trade, tourism and education for this part of Xinjiang. With core sustainable design principles, the new city aims to be an eco-city. I have worked on the design code, specifically helping to develop housing typologies. House Type 1 - Staircase access apartment
  • 56. 57 House Type 3 - Detached houseHouse Type 2 - Terraced house
  • 57. 58 Vehicular movement Non-potable waterLocal energy Drainage Cycling routesPublic transport Potable water Transport, energy and water strategy diagrams were produced by myself with the help of Buro Happold, our joint venture partners.
  • 58. 59
  • 59. Designed by George Lau Waiming Man, 2013 19 Monmouth Road, Hayes, UB3 4JQ, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)20 8573 0736 Mob: +44 (0)7905 170936 E-mail: georgelwman@yahoo.co.uk