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Northwestern msit kpmg discussion document vfinal

  1. 1. Northwestern UniversityMSIT/KPMG DiscussionBusiness Intelligence in Today’s EnvironmentMay 2009ADVISORY
  2. 2. Introductions Mitch Siewert George Haenisch Senior Manager Senior Manager Midwest BI Champion Midwest BI Champion Mitch is a Senior Manager in George has over 14 years of KPMG’s Advisory Services practice leadership and extensive technical with over 20 years of extensive expertise in Business Intelligence and functional and technical expertise. Performance Management. He has Mitch is a CPA and MBA with also assisted clients with Financial expertise in the CFO and Controller and Operational Planning, Budgeting functions, Governance, and Reporting, Data Warehousing, Organization Strategic Alignment, Enterprise Resource Planning, Business Intelligence delivery, Enterprise Architecture, IT Strategy, Statutory, Managerial and Customer Relationship Management, Performance Reporting, and Data Supply Chain Management, Service Integration and Management. Oriented Architecture, and Application Development . © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 1
  3. 3. Agenda• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 2
  4. 4. Today’s Environment Enterprises today are starved for information to manage their business• “More than 50% of the information they [Managers] obtain has no value to them” 1• 69% of all CFOs rank “Measuring/Monitoring Business Performance as their top priority 2• “Data Warehousing projects have a 70-80% failure rate” 3• “Organizations often fail to execute their strategy – failure rates may range from 60-90%.” 41 Source: Accenture study of over 1,000 managers of large companies in the UK and US, January 20072 Source: IBM CFO Study, December 20053 Source: Bill Inmon, “Information Management: Charting the Course: Little White Lies,” DM Review, August 20014 Source: R Kaplan and D P Norton, “Creating the Office of Strategy Management”, Harvard Business Review, April 2005 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 3
  5. 5. Gartner Predictions for Business Intelligence (2009)“The economic crisis will reveal which enterprises have a sound information infrastructure and which do not”* In 2009 o Collaborative decision-making will emerge as a new product category that combines social software with BI platform capabilities By 2010 o 20% of organizations will have industry-specific analytic application delivered as software-as-a service By 2012 o Business Units (not IT) will be held responsible for more than 40% of the total budget for BI projects o More than 35% of the top 5000 global companies will make uninformed decisions due to underinvestment in information infrastructure and business-user tools. o 1/3 of analytic applications applied to business processes will be delivered through large-grained application mashups *Source: L. McKay, “Gartner Gives BI a High 5”, destinationCRM.com, February 2009 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. 4 KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative.
  6. 6. Who is Affected? How are They Affected? CFO CMOFragmented reporting Critical functions often lack the Lack of agility in defining & managingCompliance (SOX etc.) data they need to make well marketing plansLimited forecasting capabilities informed management Lack of robust analytics Lack of customer relationship andTimeliness in Reporting decisions intelligence managementData Integrity Wasted communication based on poorLack of robust analytics informationSpreadsheet dependencyRedundant data marts CEOIneffective KPIs Inadequate performance insight Lack of data and information integrity Costly, manual reporting to get comprehensive view Risk of error and loss of economic value CIO What is BI? COORedundant data, multiple sources Lack of insight on operations cost – bigUser Security ‘hidden factory’Technology vs. Business requirement Multiple Transaction Systemsinterpretation Lack of intelligent, automatedToo many controls over data customer support servicesLack of planning & resources for Unable to monitor product landed costcoordinated BI strategy Not enough detail, need “drill-down” capabilities © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 5
  7. 7. Multiple Systems Supporting Multiple Functions Data is often available, but not integrated (or known)Enterprise Resource Customer Financial Systems Billing SystemsPlanning Instances Relationship Management Systems Contact Centers Unstructured Data 3rd Party Data Other Data Sources © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 6
  8. 8. Support for Decision Making Business Intelligence improves decision making and business agility Business Intelligence Adds Business Value and Enhances Agility © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 7
  9. 9. What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 8
  10. 10. What is Business Intelligence (BI)? Business Intelligence (BI) is a business capability.“Business Intelligence is the capacity to acquire, correlate and transform data intoinsightful and actionable information through analytics, enabling an organization and itsbusiness partners to make better, more timely decisions.” © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 9
  11. 11. Types of Business Intelligence There are 3 main types of BI: Strategic, Tactical and Operational Strategic BI Tactical BI Operational BI Business Achieve long-term Manage tactical Manage and optimize Focus business goals initiatives to achieve daily business strategic goals operations Primary Users Executives & Executives, analysts Analysts, LOB business analysts & LOB leaders managers, operational users & operational processes Timeframe Months to years Days to weeks to Intra-day months Data Historical data Historical data Real-time, low latency & historical data © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 10
  12. 12. Business Intelligence is More Than an IT SolutionGovernance, like BI Competency Centers (BICC), help set BI standards and priorities,evangelize BI plans and capabilities, and train end-users. © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 11
  13. 13. If BI is So Important, Why is it So Hard to Get it Right?• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 12
  14. 14. Where Companies Struggle on BI Projects There are a number of reasons that organizations struggle with BI projects Lack of Sponsorship, Data Issues (Data Organizational Quality, Standards) Politics Poor Planning, Poor Choice of Scope Creep Technology Resource Inadequate UserConstraints, Lack Involvement, of Funding AdoptionLimited Access to Trying to Do Data Everything at Once © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 13
  15. 15. Critical Success Factors• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Lessons Learned• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 14
  16. 16. Critical Success Factors, continued We have found the following to be critical success factors in BI/Business Performance Management engagements Clear Linkage between Strategic Timely Information Planning, Operational Planning, Focus on Business CriticalDelivery – Internal and External and Budgeting Processes Governance and Scalable, Cost-Effective TechnicalCommunication/Risk Management Architecture High Quality Data © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 15
  17. 17. Leading Practices• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 16
  18. 18. Leading Practices, continued How do you avoid project failure?• Define your BI vision and roadmap upfront to determine the best overall solution• Adopt an integrated solution (planning, reporting, analytics, scorecards, modeling) that best supports your performance management and BI process• Avoid the ‘Big Bang’ approach!• Engage the business users during the planning and selection phase• Ensure the solution and data architecture are scalable and flexible• Assessing a software vendor: – Test Vendor candidates with real business scenarios and data sets – Ensure the vendor uses the best database and data transformation technology to meet your business requirements © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 17
  19. 19. KPMG BI Framework• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 18
  20. 20. KPMG Framework In developing a BI vision and roadmap, frameworks help define and communicate the complex nature of BI initiatives. © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 19
  21. 21. How the Framework is Used Frameworks can be leveraged to:• Establish a starting point for common terms and definitions• Map concepts and initiatives to benchmark maturity• Gather and categorize findings by layer• Enable visioning sessions by focusing on specific framework components• Define roadmap projects to achieve the complete framework © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 20
  22. 22. How Do You Assess Your Organizational BI Capabilities?• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 21
  23. 23. How Do You Assess Your Organizational BI Capabilities?, continuedAn organizations BI capabilities should be assessed in the “Plan” phase of large-scaleBI initiatives Plan Analyze Design Implement Maintain• Determine which layers in the framework need to be addressed• Conduct surveys and inventories for each layer to determine the current state – Surveys of key stakeholders provide feedback on current capabilities/proficiencies and the importance of that capability to the future – Inventories provide information on the systems and resources currently available and utilized in support of BI• Determine gaps between current state and desired future state © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 22
  24. 24. How Do You Assess Your Organizational BI Capabilities?, continuedFeedback in the surveys and inventories determine where along the BI capabilitiesspectrum organizations fall © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 23
  25. 25. How Do You Assess Your Organizational BI Capabilities?: Observations Organizational BI maturity can be gauged according to specific criteria Organizations with Immature BI Organizations with Mature BI Capabilities CapabilitiesLevel of Analysis Static operational reports provided Analytical services providedProvidedFocus of Analysis Focus on historical trends Focus on optimizing processesData Architecture Inflexible data architecture Flexible data architectureFlexibilityData Management Multiple data silos Centralized data management (silosOrganization eliminated)Project Success Projects fail as a result of poor data Projects successfully delivered to meetRate quality and overambitious scope or exceed expectationsAlignment of Divergence between expectations and BI team anticipates businessExpectations results requirements (proactive)Organizational BI activities seen as a cost center BI activities seen as strategicView of BI • High costs, small to negative ROI • High ROI © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 24
  26. 26. Vendor Landscape• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 25
  27. 27. BI TechnologyThe State of Enabling Technologies Major themes that have arisen for BI software over the past 3 years: Enterprise Scale Platform Multi-faceted Applications • Highly scalable to thousands of users • Drillable Dashboards, Scorecards, and Ad-hoc • Localization reporting • Enterprise technology interoperability (security, • Single entry points for access to all applications standards, etc) • Role base reporting portals Pre-built Models Technical Complexity • Industry based models for quick deployments • Increasing need for dedicated IT team • Functional models for organization specific needs • Large footprint of computing power (i.e. Workforce Management and planning) • Multiple Complex technologies, and n-tier • External reporting, and financial consolidation architecture Standards Based Components Source Neutrality • XML, XBRL, BPRL, SOAP and SOA • Foundational data and metadata integration platforms • Can retrieve data from any type of store or unstructured source © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 26
  28. 28. BI TechnologyHow Has the Vendor Landscape Changed? Vendor landscape is shrinking as a result of vendor consolidation$15 B in consolidations over the last 2 years:Market share was dominated in the BPM space by Hyperion, and Cognos.SAP Business Warehouse & BPS/CPS, Business Objects, and Microsofts AnalysisServices were a close second.We have interpreted what has happened:• Application Completeness Play• Toolset Play (blur between pure play and in-depth applications) © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 27
  29. 29. Case Studies• Today’s Environment• What is Business Intelligence (BI)?• If BI is so important, why is it so hard to get it right?• Critical Success Factors• Leading Practices• KPMG Framework• How do you assess your Organizational BI capabilities?• Vendor Landscape• Case Studies• BI Trends• Questions © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 28
  30. 30. Client Case StudiesPharmaceutical Company (Global Health Sciences Company)Client Background and ChallengeOur client was in the process of consolidating multiple global ERP platforms down to four regionalinstances.The key benefit of this initiative was increased business intelligence (BI) capabilities, providingtransparency in reporting.In order to achieve this benefit, the client faced numerous challenges:• Lack of a comprehensive strategy for reporting across multiple ERP and other source systems• Lack of alignment between business and IT around enterprise business strategy• Maintenance, support and integration of: – Multiple disparate Data Warehouses/Marts, and spread marts – Multiple disparate systems and separate reporting environments/strategies – Multiple enterprise application integration tools• Master data not defined in a centralized fashion or at consistent levels• Inability to drill-down and through to the source data in transaction and operational data stores• Inability to seamlessly integrate supply chain data with financial data © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 29
  31. 31. Evolution of the StrategyThe establishment of the Global Health Sciences Company Global BI Frameworkand Strategy is the first element in the evolution to the end state Provide Establish Implement Feedback Global BI Strategy Foundation Framework Evangelize Communicate Foster interaction; inform end users of the goals, direction and available functionality of the BI programDefine Vision Define the Future Prepare for Success Empower Users EnhanceEstablish the vision: Identify the roadmap: Build foundational Think Big, Act Local Continuous• Establish BI guiding • Assess current elements including: • Tactical pilots Improvement principles state • Architecture/tools driving business • Capture feedback• Provide high-level • Define conceptual • Resources/skill sets results and early • Analyze root direction of BI end-state success causes • Governance and environment • Define roadmap to ownership • On going • Make course (people, process, achieve implementations corrections technology) • Change Management © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 30
  32. 32. Executive SummaryGlobal BI FrameworkA framework is used to communicate the various components of BI. This Global BIFramework is comprised of 6 layers, spanning business and technical areas. • Create ubiquitous accessibility to integrated transparent information • Alignment to Business Strategy • Standardization and simplification of tools, processes and models • Empowerment of end-users, flexibility, and easy of use • Plan, Govern, and Evangelize Success • Executive Sponsorship • Global standard template w/flexibility both regionally and locally © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 31
  33. 33. Global BI Framework Business StrategyBusiness Strategy Alignment AlignmentAlignment of Business Intelligence to enterprise strategy will drive consistencythrough the organization. • BI initiatives will align with IT strategies, Business strategies, and Corporate Goals • BI initiatives will be evaluated based on their alignment, both in-flight/planned and Model 1 new initiatives • ERP Transactional Reporting will be pulled directly from JDE; other reporting will be pulled from BI applications Model 2 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 32
  34. 34. Global BI Framework GovernanceGovernanceGovernance provides oversight, direction, and accountability to the enterprise, thisis facilitated through a Business Intelligence Competency Center (BICC) • BICC formalizes BI oversight, governance, and prioritization of initiatives • BICC supports end-users and promotes BI efforts to the organization • BICC communicates member activity Model 3 and data governance standards • BICC to align with ERP governance while leverage existing knowledge • BICC will have IT and business representation supported through executive sponsorship Model 4 • BICC will not centralize all resources © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 33
  35. 35. Global BI Framework PerformancePerformance Mgmt Process and Reporting Mgmt Process and ReportingMetrics and KPIs gauge strategic and operational performance; Building Blocks willfoster data transparency through standard, regional, and local BI applications. Performance Management process discipline provides aligned metrics for each level of the organization. This defines executive, management, analysis and operational metrics globally, regionally and locally. Model 5 • BI Applications ( or building blocks) which are used by all the regions are defined as “standard” BI applications • Regional and local BI Applications will be defined based on the standard template • Reconciliation occurs amongst all applications Model 6 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 34
  36. 36. Global BI Framework IntegratedIntegrated Information Management Information MgmtIntegration Information Management is the process and technology that ensures thedata foundation is trusted and traceable to the source. • A Global BI Data Model will be determined at the global level • Conformed dimensions transform data into global, regional and local information Model 7 Model 8 • Aligned with the Global IT MDM initiative, the Master Data System feeds regional and global warehouses with ERP and non-ERP Master Data. • Metadata is centralized into one Model 9 Metadata Management application, providing both business and technical data references • Global Metadata is managed at the global level; region specific metadata is managed at the regional level (including Model 10 in-region local metadata) © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 35
  37. 37. Global BI Framework Business IntelligenceBusiness Intelligence Platform PlatformThe Business Intelligence Platform provides the right information in the right toolthrough the right channel. • Aligns with and utilize the Global Information Platform (GIP) • Global Health Sciences Company tool usage conforms to Global Health Sciences Company standards Model 11 Model 12 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 36
  38. 38. Global BI Framework InfrastructureInfrastructureInfrastructure delivers trusted, secure, integrated data infrastructure for analysisand decision making. • Global data warehouse contains summary information from regional data warehouses • Regional Warehouses contain detailed (transactional) level data from regional source systems • Global and regional warehouses strive Model 13 for daily data refresh and are in-sync at summary levels. • The BI Data model is replicated into each regional warehouse • Within the warehouse(s), data is organized by Subject Areas to support functional areas Model 8 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 37
  39. 39. Client Case Studies: Global Health Sciences Company Approach: Establish BI Framework The BI Strategy is based on a framework with 6 layers Current complexity Future BI StateBusiness Strategy Alignment Few Metrics defined, no Alignment of Metrics alignment No Global GovernanceGovernance Some Regional BICC GovernancePerformance Management Process No Standard Applications Standard Building Blocks / Applicationsand Reporting (“Applications”) Leverage Specific data models.Integrated Information Management Some Data Masters but not One single data model /(“Data”) MDM (Master Data Mgt) for all Leverage Cognos understood as the Standard tools already definedBusiness Intelligence Platform standard, but not used in a by GIP (Global Information(“Tools”) consistent way Platform) Leverage 4 Regional Data WarehousesInfrastructure No standards around data 1 Summary Global Data(“Data Warehouse Infrastructure”) warehouse Warehouse Complex environment and structure Organized simplified environment © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 38
  40. 40. Client Case Studies: Global Health Sciences CompanyApproach: Create a Future State VisionThe regional template provides a consistent approach across the regions and a structurethat can be leveraged in development. Below is the source to decision model for a typicalregion © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 39
  41. 41. Client Case Studies: Global Health Sciences CompanyApproach: Create a RoadmapA roadmap serves as a guideline for when each element of a BI solution should beimplemented LA Interim Solution UCAN Interim Solution RE APAC Interim Solution Potential EU Interim Solution LA UCAN Canada ERP Global Regional APAC Argentina Australia Model Model Spain EU BICC BICC /Data BICC /Data Gov Management initiation Gov Build out Gov Implemen’n BICC BI Strategy Evangelization and Integration Plan Roadshow Building Blocks Global Building LA - Building Validation Blocks Dev Blocks Dev Standardization UCAN –Building Blocks Dev. Building Blocks Enhancements APAC –Building Blocks Dev. EU -Building Blocks Dev. Data Model DW MDM & BI GDW Combination Template Coordination Build RDW- LA Dev Foundation RDW- UCAN Dev DW Enhancements RDW- APAC Dev RDW- EU Dev Q1 09 Q2 09 Q3 09 Q4 09 Q1 10 Q2 10 Q3 10 Q4 10 Q1 11 Q2 11 Q3 11 Q4 11 Q1 12 Q2 12 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 40
  42. 42. Client Case StudiesPharmaceutical Company (Global Health Sciences Company International)Client Outcomes• The end of the project was only the beginning of the journey. The client is now in the process of implementing the ERP, as well as the BI components.• The BI strategy enabled the client to identify the proper stakeholders, and people structure to understand how to extract value from the ERP consolidation.• It also enabled the unlocking of key data in the organization and modifying the culture to become more decision oriented, rather than report focused.• The global nature of the project led to greater collaboration between all regions, and fostered shared innovation across each region.• The enhanced visibility will be realized some time in 2011, however foundational components and change agents have already set in. © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 41
  43. 43. Client Case StudiesFinancial Services (Global Payment Transfer Company International)Client Background and ChallengesOur client was in the process of implementing a new transaction system, as well asdeveloping and data warehouse and reporting solution. The perceived benefits werestandardized and more efficient business processes, improved standard reporting, and theability to make better business decisions through the use of a global ad-hoc query tool.The challenges facing the client included: • Lack of a comprehensive strategy for reporting across multiple ERP and other source systems • Highly customized, in process, Oracle implementation • Significant project leadership changes resulting in multiple project restarts • Implementation of a data warehouse and operational data store while simultaneously implementing a new source system • No data warehouse experience, no experience with governance or change management techniques • Highly leveraged to outside consultants (60+%) • Void in communication between business stakeholders and IT developers © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 42
  44. 44. Client Case Studies: Global Payment Transfer CompanyApproach: Develop Reporting Change Management and Governance Process © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 43
  45. 45. Client Case Studies: Global Payment Transfer CompanyApproach: Communicate Path to Data Governance Function Long-Term Short –Term Data Steward Council (peer group) Data Steward SME’s/BA’s Active now Today 12/4/08 © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 44
  46. 46. Client Case Studies: Global Payment Transfer CompanyApproach: Define BI Roles and Responsibilities Business DW Reporting Governance Board Executive ROLE Business Data Stewards Data Users (RGB) SponsorsPrimary Report/Data user, Gatekeeper of the Department; Determine validity of Review and prioritize requests/issues. Approve with Set policy, ensureActivities communicate requests, Qualify the need, escalate to RGB if Enterprise; Communicate changes; Manage Change compliance, serve as needs/issues requirement outside existing DW ultimate authority • Adhere to • Communicate business requirements to technical • Meet regularly to review change requests • Approve or deny established developers and be able to translate technical submitted by Data Stewards change requests reporting and solutions to the business user community • Prioritize incoming requests based on business escalated by Data data usage • Serve as gatekeeper of the department which they need Stewards and policies represent; determine if user requests have Reporting Governance • Identify if impact analysis needs to be done; Board • Communicate business value and escalate to appropriate assign tasks as needed reporting and governing body as needed • Define/update data issues to • Forward complete requests (following successful enterprise reporting • Identify and support technical resources in their impact analysis) to MGI Compliance Council assigned Data governance and Responsibilities area (data tools like – Report Studio and Query Steward; Studio users) • Approve or deny requests based on the reporting communication policies provide governance policy defined by Executive Sponsors • Communicate policy documentation • Prioritize report and data requests within their as required departments • Escalate requests to Executive Sponsors when a changes to the RGB for consensus cannot be reached or the change impact analysis and • Review and approve reports & queries submitted conflicts with existing policies communication to the for publication within their departments enterprise • Communicate request status, impact, and priority • Consistently interact and collaborate with Program to all affected parties in accordance with the Management, technical architects, developers and reporting communication policy testing teams • Maintain central repository of requests and • Assess and communicate impact of namespace provide tracking statistics (i.e., total number of changes on their departments requests, number open, number approved, etc.) • Communicate upcoming changes to their departments • Ensure users are compliant with MGI User Security policies and procedures • Serve on the Data Stewardship Committee • Review access request by user constituency and approve request, etc.Role –Legend(see A B C Dprocessflow) © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 45
  47. 47. Client Case Studies: Global Payment Transfer CompanyApproach: Develop Communication Plan Timing/Frequency Audience Audience Trigger Message Method/ Frequency Pre-Go Live Post-Go Live Count Channel (Guess) Project Steering 6 RGB Change Management metrics i. Performance Metrics Email (groundwork); Weekly Regularly-scheduled n/a Committee ii. Policy Changes Consensus work via team meetings iii. Status team meetings (monthly) All Stakeholders 25 Scope Change i. Metrics Meeting Ad-Hoc as required Scope Change n/a Change Management ii. Scope Change Processes & Procedures ii. Change Management Processes & Core Project Team 75 Project Status Report i. Project progress Team meetings, task- Ad-Hoc as required Regularly-scheduled Bi-monthly Task-related details ii. Task-related details related meetings; Weekly (minimum) team meetings (daily,P Milestones iii. Milestones Individual meetings; weekly, monthly); Andr Dependencies iv. Dependencies Task/review-specific as neededo emailje DW Partners (Oracle 5 Scope change i. Scope change Meeting; Ad-Hoc as required As Required As Requiredc Apps, Jaros, Cognos, Business process change ii. Business process changet legacy apps) Data element request iii. Data element request Email Table structure changes iv. Table structure changess ETL changes v. ETL changesum MGIDW Data 10 Project overview & progress i. Project overview & progress Email Ad-Hoc as required With each major As Requiredm Management milestone or at leasti every 3 months andt with in 3 weeks of go MGI – Cognos User 5 Project overview & progress i. Project overview & progress Email Ad-Hoc as required Beginning 3 months As Required Security Project deliverables ii. Project deliverables before go live, as Changes to sensitive field list and data iii. Changes to sensitive field list and needed model changes depending on types of ??? data model changes depending on types of security implemented MGI IT User Security 2 Project overview & progress i. Project overview & progress Email Ad-Hoc as required Within 3 months of go- As Required (Privacy) Cognos user roles ii. Cognos user roles live and as needed User access permissions Project iii. User access permissions deliverable overview IT Service 1 Specifics re: impact on workstations (new i. Project deliverable overview Email Ad-Hoc as required 3-to-5 weeks before As Required Center/Infrastructure DLLs, Plug-Ins, etc.) ii. Specifics re: impact on go-live and prior to (Help Desk/Network-LAN) Changes affecting helpdesk workstations (new DLLs, Plug-Ins, Query/Report Studio etc.) training iii. Changes affecting help desk Procedures © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 46
  48. 48. Client Case Studies: Global Payment Transfer CompanyApproach: Develop Communication Plan, continued Timing/Frequency Audience Audience Trigger Message Method/ Frequency Pre-Go Live Post-Go Live Count Channel (Guess) MGI Executive Committee 5 Policy presentation for approval i. Policy presentation for approval ESLT meeting Monthly As Required As RequiredNG DW Users 250 Project overview & progress i. Project overview & progress Email Ad-Hoc as required With each major As RequiredI Project deliverables ii. Project deliverables milestone, within three Any changes visable to iii. Any changes visible to users months of go-live, then as needed General MGI Brief description with pointers to project i. Brief description with pointers to Newsletter Monthly Monthly Quarterly page, demo site, “how to” page & ??? project page, demo site, “how to” page & contact info SOx Advisory Council 5 Project overview & progress i. Project overview & progress Council Meeting; Ad-Hoc as required With each major With each majorG (Internal Audit) Business overview controls ii. Business process controls One-on-One meetings, Weekly (minimum) change request or change requesto Application controls iii. Application controls Email scope changev Automated controls affected iv. Automated controls affected by Board/Council meetinge request (new or change)rn Governing Boards (RGB, 5 Project overview (basic understanding, i. Project overview (basic Board/Council meeting Monthly Within 3 months of go- With every changea ESC, Compliance) high level timeline) understanding, high level timeline) live, ad-hoc as requestn requiredce Data Steward Council 20 Project overview & progress i. Project overview & progress Data Steward Council Quarterly With each major With every change Policy design or change ii. Policy design or change meeting milestone; Scope request Enterprise level changes iii. Enterprise level changes change; Enterprise Entity level control requirement iv. Entity level control requirement Change Request; considerations considerations and/or changes Every 3 months (minimum); More often during testing phases © 2009 KPMG LLP, a U.S. and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved. KPMG and the KPMG logo are registered trademarks of KPMG International, a Swiss cooperative. 47

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