Restoration The Process 030209

395 views

Published on

A brief over view of the photo restoration process

Published in: Art & Photos
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
395
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
70
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Restoration The Process 030209

  1. 1. DIGITAL photo restoration “...a shoe box full of memories” The process George Ross's repair-photo.com
  2. 2. Find the old shoe box with your favorite photo This photograph was taken in 1949 and has been hand-touched by a photo artist: eyelashes, eyeliner, beauty spot, necklace. Taken in a style that is now out of fashion, sadly, this image has sections missing, is cracked and stained. What can be done?
  3. 3. Digitize the photo <ul><li>Scan the photo using an EPSON V700 Perfection scanner </li></ul><ul><li>Over-scan at 1200dpi (dots per inch)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>Normal photo resolution is 240dpi but by over-scanning we can work on very fine detail and reduce resolution when finished </li></ul>
  4. 4. Storing the photos <ul><li>The original photo is stored in a fire-proof box </li></ul><ul><li>The original scan is stored both on the Mac which will do the work and in a DROBO which is a multi-drive storage Robot (similar to RAID) guaranteeing the safety of the digital images </li></ul>
  5. 5. It's all about things called 'pixels' – photo restorers rearrange and replace pixels <ul><li>Digital photos are made up of of little dots (pixels) which are so small that you cannot see them -the greater the number of pixels in a photo the higher the resolution. 240 to 300dpi is photo quality. </li></ul><ul><li>To complicate it further, each pixel has a color depth. A high color pixel has 16 bits (16bpp) of color per pixel. As you know all colors are constructed from Red, Green and Blue – so 16bpp has 5 bits for red and blue and 6 for green </li></ul>
  6. 6. 3D to 2D <ul><li>An interesting aspect of the digitizing process is that 3-dimensional flaws (delamination in this example) are converted to 2D permitting the pixels to be rearranged and repairs to be executed in a flawless manner </li></ul>
  7. 7. Getting to work <ul><li>Using Photoshop CS3 digital image editor we can change and rearrange the pixels to restore photos to their former glory. </li></ul><ul><li>Sound easy, huh? </li></ul><ul><li>It requires a painstaking attention to detail and the patience of a saint :)‏ </li></ul>
  8. 8. Voila- returned to its former beauty
  9. 9. What do my clients receive when the project is complete? <ul><li>Both the original 1200DPI scan and the fully restored imaged @ 300PDI on a CD (archival quality disc are optional)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>A restored print of the original size of the image </li></ul><ul><li>Return of the original photograph </li></ul><ul><li>The before and after photos posted to your own web gallery </li></ul>I look forward to working on your restoration project : [email_address]

×