Inspirational Geography

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Slides from an Update Me: Creative Approaches to Inspirational Geography delivered at the Royal Geographical Society in London and Nottingham in 2014 by David Rogers.

Whilst you have to be there for the delivery, and some features of the talk have been taken out, the main messages are below:

Get over Gove and get on with it.
A strong department vision and commitment to the basics of quality literacy and numeracy are needed to drive inspirational geography.
Inspirational geography is built upon simple yet effective ideas that drive sustainable change.
Guerrilla Geography goes to the heart of what geography is. More important than fieldwork is the subject’s unique position to all young people to understand their school and local context and actually change it. Geographers study people and places so that we may understand the world better, and then change it for the better.
Sometimes, some one needs to be prepared to go toe-to-toe with the Head.
Inspirational Geography is not about putting Restless Earth around options time or running overseas trips for a minority of students.
Inspirational geography is inclusive, challenging and depends on expert teachers with expert subject knowledge.
Sometimes, you need to go to the coffee house or pub for a two hour department meeting.

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  • Some really interesting ideas. Definitely going to integrate many of them in Sept. Thanks for sharing. Jon
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Inspirational Geography

  1. 1. Inspirational Geography David Rogers @davidErogers drogersmm@me.com davidrogers.org.uk
  2. 2. 1. Vision 2. Literacy and Numeracy 3. Floating Topicality 4. Guerrilla Geography 5. Life without Levels 6. Geocaching 7. Tools behind it
  3. 3. Photo Credit used through Creative Commons ‘…there was a clear tendency amongst best teachers to see the power of the humdrum, the everyday.’ Practice Perfect, Lemov, D; Woolway E; Yezzi, K p5-6
  4. 4. SnapshotSnapshot Narrative
  5. 5. Teachers are experts
  6. 6. Inclusive
  7. 7. It’s about learning Simple, effective ideas
  8. 8. Vision
  9. 9. Change is inevitable - except from a vending machine. ~Robert C. Gallagher He tells us what we can’t teach……..
  10. 10. ‘He told me very calmly that he had broken his leg. He looked pathetic, and my immediate thought came without any emotion, You’re f****d, matey. You’re dead… no two ways about it! I think he knew it too. I could see it in his face. It was all totally rational. I knew where we were, I took in everything around me instantly, and knew he was dead.’ Simon Yates in Joe Simpson’s Touching the Void.
  11. 11. A document is never going to be creative. Teachers are.
  12. 12. Teachers’ Standard 4
  13. 13. 4. Plan and teach well structured lessons promote a love of learning and children’s intellectual curiosity
  14. 14. A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the framework and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time. Purpose of study
  15. 15. A high-quality geography education should inspire in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Teaching should equip pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As pupils progress, their growing knowledge about the world should help them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the framework and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time. Purpose of study
  16. 16. Year 7 2013 Year 11 2018 Year 2 2008 Born 2002 Financial crisis Gordon Brown PM Banks part-nationalised My uni graduation 5 Years5 Years
  17. 17. A lack of vision is the problem in geography departments. Not government or SLT.
  18. 18. Year 7 below Level 4: 20% SEN: 20% School Action Plus and Statements twice national average. 20% MEG 16% EAL 30% Pupil Premium
  19. 19. Geography at Key Stage 3 : 1 hour per week Average number of classes per teacher: 17
  20. 20. Value added: School : 996 Geography : 1012 KS4 entries: 2008 – 21 2013 - 120
  21. 21. Literacy and numeracy
  22. 22. Location Sights (most important first) Physical features Human features Sounds / smells Feeling Thanks to: Noel Jenkins
  23. 23. Make this…. …from this
  24. 24. What can eyes measure accurately? Partner voice: 10 ideas that would count in your GCSE controlled assessment.
  25. 25. Eyes were invented before equipment / technology.
  26. 26. Photo Source http://www.flickr.com/photos/sunfox/9884985/ Do now – How can using washing machines make a country more developed? Using a washing machine means Therefore, GDP per capita increases and the country becomes more developed and has a higher standard of living (wealth)
  27. 27. 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 Link to sustainability Mixed land use Integrated public transport 4/5ths of population of England, Wales & Scotland live in urban areas Housing Minister Refer to data 2 Refer to data Link to sustainability National government 14’000 proposed new jobs Young adults traditionally migrate out of rural areas to urban Builders 3 Services (including health, shops, facilities) Refer to data Link to sustainability Residents (NIMBIES) Tram-to-town Transport costs account for half all money spent by rural households 4 Large areas of urban space used for leisure & agriculture Footpaths and cycle paths Local government Link to sustainability Refer to data 15’000homes built (4’5000 starter homes) 5 Opposition Shadow Housing Minister Working from home and self employment is above average in rural areas Reported crime levels are lower in rural areas Refer to data Link to sustainability Prince of Wales 6 Better internet access in rural counties Flying Club relocated Refer to data Architects Urban Home Owners Link to sustainability
  28. 28. Geography in the news: What questions do you have about this image? Can you guess what’s going on? What? When? Who? Where? Why? Where on earth is Rocinha and what is it like to live there? Wednesday, 09 July 2014
  29. 29. Learning objectives • Interpret geographical information in order to describe Rocinha in detail, using geographical words and data. • Make a conclusion based on information. • Write about different points of view. • Make links to other geographical topics.
  30. 30. Describing Rocinha Location Sights (most important first) Physical features Human features Sounds / smells Feeling
  31. 31. Where is Rocinha? N England’s Training Base 1 mile Write a description on the sheet: • Continent • Country • Cardinal • City
  32. 32. What is Rocinha Like? Scary 1 5 10 Safe Protected 1 5 10 Unprotected Flat 1 5 10 Steep Rural 1 5 10 Urban Rich 1 5 10 Poor Full 1 5 10 Empty Attractive 1 5 10 Ugly Interesting 1 5 10 Boring Add any other words to the circle:
  33. 33. What is Rocinha like? • Make a conclusion based on information. • Write about different points of view. • Make links to other geographical topics.
  34. 34. favela Rocinha environment urban population LEDC steep North, South, infrastructure communications sprawling crime pride in addition to likewise on the other hand unlike whereas contrasting to however despite because so as to therefore Rocinha is located in… The favela is most famous for…. Its main sights are…… The area is surrounded by the following physical features… When in the favela, a person would be surrounded by… The landscape of Rocinha is very….. There are mixed feelings about Rocinha…… Officially, the favela has a population of 70,000, but in reality… Evidence to support me includes… The decision of the Army to take over the area is… Some may disagree / agree because… Stuff Things It People Better Q: What is Rocinha like and what is it like to live there? ocabulary onnectives peners anned
  35. 35. What’s the story?
  36. 36. Listen • List the hazards. • Imagine, what would you be thinking, feeling, doing if you lived in New Jersey?
  37. 37. Imagine this is your house. Describe how you would be feeling. Imagine this was your house. Describe how you would be feeling..
  38. 38. Rank these 7 images in order, MOST EXTREME to LEAST EXTREME. Annotate (Label) each photo to justify your decision. A B E D GF C
  39. 39. Location: Sights: Physicalfeatures: Human features:Sounds / Smells: Feelings:
  40. 40. Guerrilla Geography
  41. 41. gapingvoid.com
  42. 42. What is the point of Guerrilla Geography? Covert action Creative Thought provoking
  43. 43. Little Notices
  44. 44. Geography / EAL Mashup
  45. 45. CLAP
  46. 46. Young people who do not have access to the internet at home or in schools — and who lack the support that comes from parents or teachers equipped with strong digital skills — will not develop the necessary social, learning and technical skill sets for success in a wired global economy. The State of the World’s Children 2011, UNICEF Thanks to John Connell
  47. 47. http://www.flickr.com/photos/audrix/2043561356/ 1. Creation of an acceptable use policy in social time linked to Rights, Respects and Responsibilities framework.
  48. 48. http://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/4592915995/ Article 16 1. No child shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his or her privacy, family, or correspondence, nor to unlawful attacks on his or her honour and reputation. 2. The child has the right to the protection of the law against such interference or attacks.
  49. 49. 3. Best interests of the child 12. Respect for the views of the child 13. Freedom of expression 17. Access to information; mass media 28. Right to education 29. Goals of education: ‘develop each child’s personality, talents and abilities to the fullest.’
  50. 50. Levels are gone
  51. 51. Can potential be measured?
  52. 52. Thanks to Patcham High’s Art department and @PrioryGeography
  53. 53. Do now: Thunk: Discuss using partner voice. How do you know an island exists when you haven’t been there?
  54. 54. Bing
  55. 55. Bing Maps OS Layer
  56. 56. Photosynth
  57. 57. newtools.org
  58. 58. Living Schemes of Work
  59. 59. Student curriculum hackers
  60. 60. Communities http://staffrm.io/
  61. 61. Is your curriculum full of JONK?
  62. 62. “Your are not here merely to make a living. You are here to enable the world to live more amply, with greater vision, and with a finer spirit of hope and achievement. You are here to enrich the world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget this errand.” Woodrow Wilson.
  63. 63. Opportunities
  64. 64. ‘What gets you out of bed in the morning and in to school?’ @davidErogers

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