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Positive xternalities

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  • 1. Positive Externalities AS Microeconomics
  • 2. A quick recap on externalities An externality exists when the action of one agent unavoidably affects the welfare of another agent. The affected agent may be a consumer, giving rise to a consumption externality, or a producer, giving rise to a production externality
  • 3. What are positive externalities? Positive externalities create benefits to third parties Activities said to generate positive externalities include:  Social returns from investment in education & training  Benefits from high quality public service broadcasting  Positive benefits from health care and medical research  Benefits from vaccination and immunization programmes  Flood protection systems & fire safety equipment  Restored historic buildings and monuments  Social benefits from protecting environmental resources
  • 4. Social benefits Where there are positive externalities the social benefit of production and/or consumption exceeds the private benefit
  • 5. Social benefits explained Private + External benefits = Social Benefits Benefits Benefits to Benefits to others of Total benefits to individual individual society of aconsumers or consumers or firms given economic firms of their economic activity activity economic activity Benefits to Benefits to third Total benefitsfirst parties - parties - others to society – individuals everyone
  • 6. Positive spill-overs Flood protection schemes, immunization and galleries and museums all provide external benefits Left to itself, would the free- market fail to provide sufficient products that yield positive externalities?
  • 7. Positive externalities from educationand training Improved social skills and awareness of citizenship Greater long-term contribution to the economy  Higher productivity  Diffusion of knowledge and understanding  Improved employability / reduced risk of structural unemployment Impact on international competitiveness from an improvement in human capital All of the above should help to contribute to a higher trend rate of growth Higher expected earnings might provide increased tax revenues for the government
  • 8. Positive externalities and market failureCostsandBenefits Marginal Private Cost = Marginal Consumer Social Cost Surplus Margin Produce al r Surplus Social Benefit Margin al Private Benefit Equilibriu Q1 Q2 Output m output
  • 9. Positive externalities and market failureCosts Gain toand otherBenefit peoples Marginal Private Cost = Marginal Consumer Social Cost Surplus Margin Produce al r Surplus Social Benefit Margin al Private Benefit Equilibriu Q1 Q2 Output m output
  • 10. Positive externalities and market failureCostsandBenefits Marginal Private Cost = Marginal Social Cost Margin al Social Benefit MarginIn a free market alconsumption will be at Q1 Privatebecause Demand = Supply Benefit(private benefit = privatecost ) Q1 Q2 Output
  • 11. Positive externalities and market failureCostsandBenefits Marginal Private Cost = Marginal Social Cost Margin al Social Benefit MarginHowever this is socially alinefficient because Social PrivateCost < Social Benefit. BenefitTherefore there is underconsumption of the Q1 Q2 Outputpositive externality
  • 12. Positive externalities and market failureCostsandBenefits Marginal Private Cost = Marginal Social Cost Margin al Social Benefit MarginSocial Efficiency would aloccur at Q2 where Social PrivateMarginal Cost = Social BenefitMarginal Benefit Q1 Q2 Output
  • 13. Positive externalities and market failureCosts Welfare loss fromand the good beingBenefit under-consumeds Marginal Private Cost = Marginal Social Cost Margin al Social Benefit MarginUnder-consumption of alproducts with positive Privateexternalities leads to a net Benefitloss of social welfare –shown in the diagram above Q1 Q2 Output
  • 14. Encouraging supply to reap social returns
  • 15. Government intervention options Government subsidy either to producer or consumer  Reduce private cost of consumption or reduce cost of supply  Lower costs should cause an expansion of demand  E.g. Student grants and low-cost loans?  Subsidies to fund free entrance to museums and heritage sites  Providing free vaccines at the point of use Command and Control techniques  Minimum school leaving age  Compulsory health immunisation programmes Improved information flows to potential consumers  Health awareness programmes  Goods with positive externalities are often public goods – e.g. Investment in reduction programmes for communicable diseases
  • 16. A subsidy to the producerCosts Welfare loss fromand the good beingBenefit under-consumeds MPC=MSC MPC with subsidy MSBA producer subsidy would MPBcut the marginal cost ofsupplying to the consumer –a lower price would bringabout an expansion of Q1 Q2 Outputdemand towards the sociallyoptimal level
  • 17. Evaluation points Often difficult to identify the positive externalities and then put a market value on them People/organisations may have an incentive to over-estimate the spill-over benefits when lobbying for financial assistance Providing services ‘free at the point’ of need may cause over-consumption Subsidies always carry an opportunity cost Regulation consumption involves a cost too
  • 18. Tutor2u Keep up-to-date with economics, resources, quizzes and worksheets for your economics course.

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