www.studentpirgs.org/open-textbooksGeoff CainCollege of the Redwoods
Godin, Seth. (2010) “The Coming Melt-Down in Higher Education (as seen by a marketer)http://sethgodin.typepad.com/
Prices rising  2x the rate of  inflation
Students average$750 - $900  per year on   textbooks
Part 1:    Flawed market structure gives publishers too much    power                                  Publisher          ...
Part 2:Self-destructive business model drives unstable model                               Publisher  Each textbook is bou...
HighPrice  s       only        $238.95
NewEditions      new 6th           used 5th edition            $81.78                   $213.95
Biology, 8e          with CengageNOW, Personal Tutor          with SMARTHINKING, InfoTrac 2-          Semester Printed Acc...
Who Pays for Textbooks?•   Students•   Parents•   EOPS•   Board of Gov.•   Financial Aide
The solution must:   1. Utilize open, non-commercial licenses   • Texts must be easily editable   • Come from the academic...
Redefine the model and the “text.”
Whatmakes atextbook open?
An “Open Text” is free of copyrightconstraints.• Public Domain• Creative Commmons  o   Attribution (by)  o   Share Alike (...
Open licenses legally grant the right to:• Make copies and change formats• Distribute copies• Create customized versions
A good way to think about open licenses:© Some Rights Reserved (vs. All RightsReserved)
Content is like traditional textbooks:• Table of contents, chapters, index• Written by expert author• Edited and peer-revi...
Formats go beyond traditional textbooks:• Accessible free online by the public• Downloadable,  typically as a PDF• Availab...
CollaborativeStatisticsByBarbara Illowsky and Susan Deancnx.org/content/col10522
Download PDF   or print Read online   version Purchaseprinted copy
Purchasing a hard copy throughprint on demand publisher QOOP
Click here to  print outNavigate table of contentsKey term links to definition
Benefits for students:• Students choose their preferred format (print,  PDF, online, etc.)• Online access is free• Other f...
Benefits for instructors:•   All students have immediate access to the text•   New editions are optional•   Ability to cus...
Benefits for Colleges• Greater access to education for more students• Save money• Textbooks customized to  a specific popu...
The Downside…• Can require organized, coordinated effort• Books need reviewers• Possible hidden infrastructure costs (host...
Individual authors• Personal motivations• Sabbatical time/grant funding• Count open textbooks toward tenure?
Institutional projects• A consortium of 80+ community colleges is  pooling resources to write and review texts• Rice Unive...
Government funding• A new bill introduced by Sen. Durbin (D-IL) would  create a federal grant program to create open  text...
What About "Open" Commercial Publisherslike Flat World Knowledge?This is a failed model because:• It is how we got into tr...
The Long Tail                The same area
Benefits of this publishing model:• Used books aren’t a big threat, since new books  are affordable• Digital and print-on-...
Remember, the solution must:  1.Utilize open, non-commercial licenses  • Texts must be easily editable  • Come from the ac...
Instructors can•   Seek & consider open textbooks•   Participate in open communities•   Promote open textbooks at their co...
Students can• Speak to their professors and encourage them to  consider open textbooks• Promote open texts on campus thoug...
Colleges can• Offer support to faculty interested in adopting or writing  open textbooks• Consider textbook authoring in t...
Some Specific Examples • OpenStax - Free, openly licensed, peer-reviewed books. • Methods of Discovery: a guide to researc...
Open Textbooks, Open Doors -  2012
Open Textbooks, Open Doors -  2012
Open Textbooks, Open Doors -  2012
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Open Textbooks, Open Doors - 2012

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This is our most current presentation on open textbooks.

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  • I don't know if this image is clear or not but the bottom green line represents the rise in the cost of living, the yellow line, rising medical costs, and the orange line the rise in college tuition and fees. 
  • Textbook costs are rising at twice the rate of inflation. 
  • According to Student Pirgs, college students average $900 a year on textbooks. 
  • Open Textbooks, Open Doors - 2012

    1. 1. www.studentpirgs.org/open-textbooksGeoff CainCollege of the Redwoods
    2. 2. Godin, Seth. (2010) “The Coming Melt-Down in Higher Education (as seen by a marketer)http://sethgodin.typepad.com/
    3. 3. Prices rising 2x the rate of inflation
    4. 4. Students average$750 - $900 per year on textbooks
    5. 5. Part 1: Flawed market structure gives publishers too much power Publisher Student Professor
    6. 6. Part 2:Self-destructive business model drives unstable model Publisher Each textbook is bought and sold several times, but the publisher only profits on the first sale Bookstore used books Students
    7. 7. HighPrice s only $238.95
    8. 8. NewEditions new 6th used 5th edition $81.78 $213.95
    9. 9. Biology, 8e with CengageNOW, Personal Tutor with SMARTHINKING, InfoTrac 2- Semester Printed Access Card Costly $213.95Bundles
    10. 10. Who Pays for Textbooks?• Students• Parents• EOPS• Board of Gov.• Financial Aide
    11. 11. The solution must: 1. Utilize open, non-commercial licenses • Texts must be easily editable • Come from the academic community • Include peer-review and editing • Provide free options for students • Create a useable, accessible repository • Utilize an efficient distribution and print-on-demand system
    12. 12. Redefine the model and the “text.”
    13. 13. Whatmakes atextbook open?
    14. 14. An “Open Text” is free of copyrightconstraints.• Public Domain• Creative Commmons o Attribution (by) o Share Alike (sa) o Non-Commercial (nc) o No Derivative Works (nd)
    15. 15. Open licenses legally grant the right to:• Make copies and change formats• Distribute copies• Create customized versions
    16. 16. A good way to think about open licenses:© Some Rights Reserved (vs. All RightsReserved)
    17. 17. Content is like traditional textbooks:• Table of contents, chapters, index• Written by expert author• Edited and peer-reviewed
    18. 18. Formats go beyond traditional textbooks:• Accessible free online by the public• Downloadable, typically as a PDF• Available in print
    19. 19. CollaborativeStatisticsByBarbara Illowsky and Susan Deancnx.org/content/col10522
    20. 20. Download PDF or print Read online version Purchaseprinted copy
    21. 21. Purchasing a hard copy throughprint on demand publisher QOOP
    22. 22. Click here to print outNavigate table of contentsKey term links to definition
    23. 23. Benefits for students:• Students choose their preferred format (print, PDF, online, etc.)• Online access is free• Other formats are optional and fairly priced
    24. 24. Benefits for instructors:• All students have immediate access to the text• New editions are optional• Ability to customize• Corrections are immediate
    25. 25. Benefits for Colleges• Greater access to education for more students• Save money• Textbooks customized to a specific population
    26. 26. The Downside…• Can require organized, coordinated effort• Books need reviewers• Possible hidden infrastructure costs (hosting, printing, distribution, etc.)
    27. 27. Individual authors• Personal motivations• Sabbatical time/grant funding• Count open textbooks toward tenure?
    28. 28. Institutional projects• A consortium of 80+ community colleges is pooling resources to write and review texts• Rice University founded CNX.org, a platform that hosts numerous open textbooks• Hewlett & Maxfield Foundations funded the creation of a new open textbook
    29. 29. Government funding• A new bill introduced by Sen. Durbin (D-IL) would create a federal grant program to create open textbooks through the NSF• The WA community college system received state funding to create open curriculum & texts for the 80 highest enrollment courses.
    30. 30. What About "Open" Commercial Publisherslike Flat World Knowledge?This is a failed model because:• It is how we got into trouble in the first place• It sets up a commercial intermediary between the students and content• Tends to create proprietary interfaces (reader software) that costs money• Costs inevitably go up
    31. 31. The Long Tail The same area
    32. 32. Benefits of this publishing model:• Used books aren’t a big threat, since new books are affordable• Digital and print-on-demand distribution is far more efficient• No need for excessive restrictions to prevent piracy - the book is already available for free!
    33. 33. Remember, the solution must: 1.Utilize open, non-commercial licenses • Texts must be easily editable • Come from the academic community • Include peer-review and editing • Provide free options for students • Create a useable, accessible repository • Utilize an efficient distribution and print-on-demand system There are models that do this now!
    34. 34. Instructors can• Seek & consider open textbooks• Participate in open communities• Promote open textbooks at their colleges• Negotiate electronic rights
    35. 35. Students can• Speak to their professors and encourage them to consider open textbooks• Promote open texts on campus though student govt.• Get involved with Student PIRGS
    36. 36. Colleges can• Offer support to faculty interested in adopting or writing open textbooks• Consider textbook authoring in tenure• Provide stipends and sabbatical• Join other colleges in joint OER efforts
    37. 37. Some Specific Examples • OpenStax - Free, openly licensed, peer-reviewed books. • Methods of Discovery: a guide to research writingOpen Textbook Collections • OER Commons - There are a lot of textbooks here that will be of interest to us. Under recommended resources click on "textbooks.“ • Connexions - This is a site that features reusable modules and learning objects as well as some textProject Sites for OER and Open Textbooks • Sophia Open Content Initiative - This is from De Anza and a good example of a grant-driven project in California. • Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources - This project site has a lot of useful links. • Open Education Resources Center for California - This is a good site for more information and resources in California.More information on OER at Brainstorm in Progress.Adapted from a presentation by The Student PIRGsIllustrations from www.studentpirgs.org and http://commons.wikimedia.org unless otherwise noted.

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