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Lesson 1   intro to urban land use
 

Lesson 1 intro to urban land use

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    Lesson 1   intro to urban land use Lesson 1 intro to urban land use Presentation Transcript

    • Unit 2: Settlement Welcome back! (Did you do your Christmas work?)
    • Land use in urban areas
    • What does ‘land use’ mean? How is land used in cities?
    • How is land used in urban areas? Starter: Complete the following table by adding the terms below to the correct columns Shops Dockyards Banks Factories Houses Flats Parks Restaurants Cinemas Offices Residential Entertainment Open Space Industrial Commercial
    • Key words Urban – A built up area (area with lots of buildings), with a high population, for example a town or city Land-use – The way in which land is used Urban land-use – The way land is used in a town or city Commercial – eg. shops, offices, banks Residential – different types of housing (residence) Entertainment – eg. bowling, cinema, restaurants Open space – eg. parks, lakes Industrial – eg. factories, naval dockyards Services – schools, hospitals, government, etc. Copy down the definitions
    • Name the land use shown in the photo
    • Enquiry Task: Who was Mr Burgess and what did he have to say about land use in cities? Use the textbooks to answer the question. Include a diagram. Geog.GCSE p179 (New Key Geog p156 – but be careful of the keywords)
    • Land-use can be divided into 5 different zones In some cities, the simple Burgess model like this works…. Outer Suburbs Inner Suburbs Inner City/ Twilight Zone Industrial Zone CBD
    • Urban land-use can be divided into 5 different zones CBD – Central Business District Outer Suburbs Inner Suburbs Twilight Zone (Inner City) Industrial Zone
    • 6. Semi-detached houses with gardens 11. Lots of public transport links 10. Parks and open spaces 18. Modern out-of -town shopping centres 16. Terraced housing 17. Some garages 9. High-rise flats may now replace some run-down areas 5. Shops and Offices 13. Tall high density buildings 1. Leisure and entertainment facilities 15. Land is cheaper 14. Cheapest housing 19. High-value land 3. Very few driveways 2. Large detached houses with garages 8. Grew in response to increased car ownership 12. Oldest 4. Most expensive houses 20. Industry 7. Newest
    • Match it up! Colour code the statements to fit the 5 categories: - CBD - - Inner City/Twilight Zone - - Industrial Zone - - Inner Suburbs - - Outer Suburbs - Remember to use a key
    • 6. Semi-detached houses with gardens 11. Lots of public transport links 10. Parks and open spaces 18. Modern out-of -town shopping centres 16. Terraced housing 17. Some garages 9. High-rise flats may now replace some run-down areas 5. Shops and Offices 13. Tall high density buildings 1. Leisure and entertainment facilities 15. Land is cheaper 14. Cheapest housing 19. High-value land 3. Very few driveways 2. Large detached houses with garages 8. Grew in response to increased car ownership 12. Oldest 4. Most expensive houses 20. Industry 7. Newest 6. Semi-detached houses with gardens 11. Lots of public transport links 10. Parks and open spaces 18. Modern out-of -town shopping centres 16. Terraced housing 17. Some garages 9. High-rise flats may now replace some run-down areas 5. Shops and Offices 13. Tall high density buildings 1. Leisure and entertainment facilities 15. Land is cheaper 14. Cheapest housing 19. High-value land 3. Very few driveways 2. Large detached houses with garages 8. Grew in response to increased car ownership 12. Oldest 4. Most expensive houses 20. Industry 7. Newest
    • Maps from memory: How is land used in Portsmouth? Try to draw a sketch of Portsmouth from memory showing the different zones.
    • What land uses can you identify?
    • Exam Questions Why are there lots of tall buildings in the CBD? (2marks) Why do businesses want to set up their offices in the CBD? (2marks) 3. Why do you think there are very few driveways in the area surrounding Priory? (1mark) 4. Why do you think driveways become more common as you move away from the city centre? (2marks) 5. If out-of-town shopping centres (like retail parks) increase, what problems might be caused? (3marks)
    • Homework Go for a walk around Portsmouth (ooooh, exciting!) Take a series of photos to demonstrate different land use that you find Try to take photos that prove which urban zones you see, (e.g. a street of terraced housing for inner city) You can use your phone or a camera for photos. Then print out as a collage / poster / map with annotations. Due:
    • A4 poster Make notes / revision points / sketches to describe what the different land-use zones are like: - CBD - Industrial zone - Inner City (Twilight Zone) - Inner Suburbs - Outer Suburbs New Key Geog p158-162, Geog.GCSE p178
    • Urban land use: Zone 1 CBD = Central Business District The CBD is at the heart of a town or city and usually has great accessibility, large shopping and banking areas, and government buildings
    • Characteristics of a CBD Old Core - often narrow streets / historical core (e.g. Old Portsmouth) - Very Accessible - major rail and road routes (often find public transport stations meet here - e.g. railway stations / bus stations) Entertainment - restaurants, clubs, etc Historical buildings (e.g. museums, castles, etc.) Government buildings (e.g. councils) Many have covered shopping centres (e.g. Cascades) Traffic Restrictions e.g. pedestrian areas (like Commercial Rd) Land has very high value - due to lack of space and competition for land Many National Chain stores (attract larger numbers of customers + can afford the high land cost/rent - e.g. M&S; WHS; Topshop Little/ No Residential because so expensive, maybe some flats above shops Banks, building societies, Estate Agents – where they can receive more customers
    • Zone 2: Inner City What is the Inner City? The Inner City is the land-use zone around the city centre, it is also known as the twilight zone or zone of transition. When did the Inner City grow up? Inner city areas grew up in the 19th century as towns increased rapidly due to the Industrial Revolution. This led to the growth of factories and low-cost terraced housing around what is now the city centre.
    • Characteristics of the Inner City High density 19th Century housing and manufacturing. Housing is usually linear, back to back and terraced This area tends to be run down unless housing has been redeveloped Land values are lower than those in the CBD . However, they still remain high. Houses are cheaper to buy / rent Population density in the inner city is very high as houses have been squeezed in. Crowded areas with little open space Front doors open straight on to the pavement No front or back gardens (just a small back yard) factories providing employment for residents Social Problems - high crime rates, above average concentrations of low-income citizens
    • CBD (CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT) 1. Leisure and entertainment facilities 5. Shops and Offices 11. Lots of public transport links 12. Oldest 13. Tall high density buildings 19. High-value land INDUSTRIAL ZONE 20. Industry TWILIGHT ZONE (INNER CITY) 3. Very few driveways 9. High-rise flats may now replace some run-down areas 14. Cheapest housing 16. Terraced housing INNER SUBURBS 6. Semi-detached houses with gardens 8. Grew in response to increased car ownership 17. Some garages OUTER SUBURBS 2. Large detached houses with garages 4. Most expensive houses 7. Newest 10. Parks and open spaces 15. Land is cheaper 18. Modern out-of -town shopping centres How is land used in urban areas? Use the Venn Diagram to classify each land-use statement (1-20) into social , economic or cultural Social Cultural Economic
    • 1. & 2. Tall buildings are located in the ………….. because land prices are very …………………………… here and so it is much cheaper to build upwards. Many businesses choose to set up their offices in the CBD because this is generally the most ………………………… part of a city, meaning people can travel here to work easily. Most major shopping chains also choose to locate in the CBD for the same reasons. Also, if shops are in a more accessible area then this is likely to attract more …………………………, which brings in more ……………………... 3. & 4. Priory is surrounded by lots of …………………………… houses which tend not to have driveways. This is partly due to limited ……………………………. in this …………………………….. location. Additionally, inner city housing in Portsmouth, like that surrounding Priory, was originally built a long time ago to house ………………………………………………... At this time very few people owned ……………………….. and residents could walk to work. Therefore there was no need for houses to have driveways. As you move away from the inner city towards the ………………………. the number of driveways …………………………... This is because the suburbs grew in response to an increase in car ownership, meaning people could travel longer ………………………… to work and could therefore live further away. Hence, since the suburbs grew in response to increased car ownership, ………………… houses have driveways as you move ……………………………………… from the city centre. 5. An increase in the number of out-of-town shopping centres may lead to a ………………………. in the number of people travelling to the CBD, resulting in shops in the CBD …………………….. customers and therefore money. If shops are losing money they may reach a point where they can no longer afford to remain …………………, meaning that shops in the CBD may begin to close and therefore the CBD may become run-down and suffer ………………………………. – a process whereby a town or city falls into a state of disrepair, resulting in unemployment, abandonment of shops, etc. losing; money; suburbs; urban decay; further away; space; dockyard workers; accessible; cars; CBD; terraced; shoppers; expensive; more; open; inner city; distances; increases; decline;
    • How is land used around Priory School Which zone does Priory belong to?
    • How is land used around Priory School Which zone does Priory belong to?
    • How has land use changed? 1999
    • How has land use changed? Dec 2005
    • How has land use changed? 2010