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Brownfield + greenfield zones
 

Brownfield + greenfield zones

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Brownfield + greenfield zones Brownfield + greenfield zones Presentation Transcript

  • Brownfield + Greenfield zones Characteristics + land use change
  • Urban development
    • Urbanisation is the process of urban areas spreading + becoming bigger
    • As urban areas develop they sprawl outwards and in to areas that have not been built on before
    • Urban areas need access to space for housing/shops/roads/etc. – this has implications
  • Urban development
    • To protect land from being consumed by cities and developments there are laws to restrict land use
    • Green belts are areas of land around a city that form a boundary to development (housing and industry is severely restricted + the countryside is protected)
  • Planned new housing provision in England 1991-2011 Exam Qs: Housing development Questions: 1. Where are most houses planned to be built between 1991-2011? 2. Why do you think this is?
  • Brownfield or Greenfield – Which is best? Brownfield - A site that has been built on before and is ready for development. Normally associated with urban inner city areas Greenfield – A site that has not been built on before. Often rural/countryside areas. This includes the rural-urban fringe.
  • Brownfield + Greenfield
    • Greenfield vs Brownfield Sites2.flv
  • What are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Brownfield and Greenfield Sites? Disadvantages of Greenfield Sites Disadvantages of Brownfield Sites Advantages of Greenfield Sites Advantages of Brownfield Sites
  • Brownfield + Greenfield
    • Use the New Key Geography textbook to find a definition for Brownfield and Greenfield sites + copy down
    • Use p 175 to add to your own table to compare brownfield + greenfield sites. Consider positives + negatives for using each.
    • You need to understand these keywords and their characteristics for your controlled assessment.
  • Land use change: brownfield and greenfield areas
  • Gunwharf Quays – before its redevelopment
  • Gunwharf Quays 2010 – regenerated and redeveloped. Change of land use from industrial / military to recreational / commercial
  • Photograph Annotation Annotate the photograph of Gunwharf Quays prior to redevelopment? What evidence is there that this is a brownfield site?
  • Brownfield Sites
    • “ An area of land that has been built on in the past and can be used for redevelopment”
    • e.g. it may have had industrial buildings in the past which are derelict + can be knocked down and redeveloped
    • There is a brownfield site next to Commercial Road where industry used to be…this is a potential new housing area.
  • Greenfield Sites
    • “ An area of land that has never been developed before”
    • These areas are usually in the countryside + may be part of green belts.
    • This would include areas outside of Portsmouth, the council are currently considering an area West of Waterlooville and Hornsea
  • Greenfield v. Brownfield Issues
    • Brownfield redevelopment eases pressure on Greenfield sites and is more sustainable
    • Greenfield sites are often on the edge of towns and cities and may have better access, have less congestion, be in a more pleasant environment and have more space and room to expand
    • House prices would increase in inner city areas as people are encouraged back to the area. This might mean that local people can not afford the houses, and the council will have the problem of providing for them
    • Infrastructure already exists in urban areas- in Greenfield sites new drainage, electricity, roads etc. would all have to be produced
    • Light industry and things like Science Parks favour out of town locations on Greenfield sites-they prefer them to Brownfield sites, and crucially so do their workers who are happier to live away from urban areas
    • New employment opportunities if Brownfield sites are developed
    • New housing can lead to gentrification (old housing done up- area becomes more trendy and affluent) so the area will improve and things like crime rates will improve
    • New sites are easier to build on as there is a fresh start, where remains of previous land use do not need to be cleared and is more attractive to retail parks, housing developers etc.
    • Providing public transport networks is easier in central areas where the population densities are high- investment is focussed in central areas
    • There is an issue of contamination and making sites safe for development, given what the land may have been used for before
    • Towns and cities do not want their areas to decay- redevelopment results in more people coming to the area, which helps local businesses. Building on Greenfield sites ‘sucks’ out the core from towns as shop etc. locate on the edge of tons/cities
    • Using Greenfield sites is not sustainable- there is too much pressure on the rural-urban fringe and the use of Brownfield sites has to be a better option
  • 18. Redeveloping Brownfield sites can bring a ‘dead’ area back to life 17. Large family houses with gardens are more likely to be able to be built on Greenfield sites – often not enough space for this in Brownfield areas 16. Wildlife may suffer when Greenfield land is built on – may lose habitats, trees may have to be cut down, etc 15. Building on Greenfield sites may reduce traffic and congestion in cities 14. In Greenfield sites new drainage, electricity, roads, etc would all have to be produced 13. Increased house prices due to inner city redevelopment might mean that local people cannot afford the houses, and the council will have the problem of providing for them 20. People may protest to Greenfield developments 19. Clearing rubbish from Brownfield areas is expensive 12. Using Greenfield sites is often not sustainable 11. Towns and cities do not want their areas to decay – redevelopment results in more people coming to the area, which helps local businesses 10. There may be an issue of contamination and making sites safe for development, given what the land may have been used for before 9. Providing public transport networks is easier in central areas where the population densities are high – investment is focused in central areas 8. New sites are easier to build on as there is a fresh start, where remains of previous land-use do not need to be cleared, and is more attractive to retail parks, housing developers, etc 7. New housing can lead to gentrification (old housing done up – area becomes more trendy and affluent) so the area will improve and statistics like crime rates will improve 6. New employment opportunities if Brownfield sites are developed 5. Building on Greenfield sites ‘sucks’ out the core from towns as shops, etc locate on the edge of towns/cities 4. Infrastructure already exists in urban areas 3. House prices would increase in inner city areas as people are encouraged back into the area 2. Greenfield sites are often on the edge of towns and cities and may have better access, have less congestion, be in a more pleasant environment and have more space to expand 1. Brownfield redevelopment eases pressure on Greenfield sites and is more sustainable – Its good to reuse land
  • 18. Redeveloping Brownfield sites can bring a ‘dead’ area back to life 17. Large family houses with gardens are more likely to be able to be built on Greenfield sites – often not enough space for this in Brownfield areas 16. Wildlife may suffer when Greenfield land is built on – may lose habitats, trees may have to be cut down, etc 15. Building on Greenfield sites may reduce traffic and congestion in cities 14. In Greenfield sites new drainage, electricity, roads, etc would all have to be produced 13. Increased house prices due to inner city redevelopment might mean that local people cannot afford the houses, and the council will have the problem of providing for them 20. People may protest to Greenfield developments 19. Clearing rubbish from Brownfield areas is expensive 12. Using Greenfield sites is often not sustainable 11. Towns and cities do not want their areas to decay – redevelopment results in more people coming to the area, which helps local businesses 10. There may be an issue of contamination and making sites safe for development, given what the land may have been used for before 9. Providing public transport networks is easier in central areas where the population densities are high – investment is focused in central areas 8. New sites are easier to build on as there is a fresh start, where remains of previous land-use do not need to be cleared, and is more attractive to retail parks, housing developers, etc 7. New housing can lead to gentrification (old housing done up – area becomes more trendy and affluent) so the area will improve and statistics like crime rates will improve 6. New employment opportunities if Brownfield sites are developed 5. Building on Greenfield sites ‘sucks’ out the core from towns as shops, etc locate on the edge of towns/cities 4. Infrastructure already exists in urban areas 3. House prices would increase in inner city areas as people are encouraged back into the area 2. Greenfield sites are often on the edge of towns and cities and may have better access, have less congestion, be in a more pleasant environment and have more space to expand 1. Brownfield redevelopment eases pressure on Greenfield sites and is more sustainable – Its good to reuse land
  •  
  • Brownfield or Greenfield – Which is best? What do you think? Copy and complete the speech bubble stating your opinion. I think that …………..field is best because………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
  • Questions 1. What do you think the most important advantage is for:- a) Greenfield sites b) Brownfield sites Give reasons for your choices 2. What do you think the most important disadvantage is for:- a) Greenfield sites b) Brownfield sites Give reasons for your choices 3. What does gentrification mean? 4. Can you think of a real example of this found in Portsmouth?
  • Extension Use the textbook, pages 190-191 to help Many people are choosing to move out of city locations and into the countryside 1. Identify 3 groups of people who support this decision and 3 groups who are against this. Explain why each group feels the way they do 2.Explain what is meant by the term ‘Green Belt’ 3. What problems exist with Green Belts?