Putting Partnership back at the     Heart of Development:          Canadian Civil Society        Experience with CIDA’s Ca...
Survey BackgrounderIn July 2010, the Minister of International Cooperation, the Hon. Beverley J. Oda, established new fund...
Survey Backgrounder (con’t)The survey had five goals:• Map the outcomes of the various calls‐for‐proposals and share these...
The RespondentsThis report is based on the responses of the 158 organizations that participated in the survey.109 proposal...
The Respondents (Con’t)60                                         7050                                       6040         ...
Outcomes of the Call for Proposals• Close to 25% of the 158   respondents had not applied to   any of the competitions, ei...
Outcomes of the Over/Under 2 M Calls• For the “Under $2 million”   competition there was a much                           ...
Impacts of the Call for Proposal System The vast majority of respondents raised serious concerns over a range of significa...
Impacts of the Call for Proposal SystemMore emphasis on              Need to restructure the        Reduction or end to lo...
Impacts of the Call for Proposal SystemCuts to public engagement      A chill on advocacy (PE) work, with 64% of         a...
Key ConclusionsA system that requires much improvementThe implementation of the new PWCB funding mechanism has been a diff...
Key Conclusions (con’t)Canadian public awareness of and active engagement in global poverty issues is at riskThe sudden el...
Key Conclusions (con’t)The domino effect of losing CIDA fundingThe loss of CIDA funding by so many organizations doesn’t j...
Key Conclusions (con’t)Learning from what worksIt seems that the specialized calls for proposals (Haiti, Muskoka) have wor...
Main Recommendations# 1    Produce clear and predictable annual timetables# 2    Create a two‐tiered process# 3    Make su...
Main Recommendations# 5    Establish a regular and formal mechanism for ongoing        dialogue# 6    Engage in a national...
Main Recommendations# 9     Create greater transparency prior to and during the         assessment process# 10        CIDA...
How can CCIC and the Provincial/Regional Councils be Helpful?• Advocacy ‐ Respondents felt that the  Councils are well‐pos...
THANK-YOU!
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Putting Partnership back at the Heart of Development

290

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
290
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Putting Partnership back at the Heart of Development

  1. 1. Putting Partnership back at the  Heart of Development: Canadian Civil Society  Experience with CIDA’s Call‐ for‐Proposal Mechanism,  Partnerships with Canadians Branch
  2. 2. Survey BackgrounderIn July 2010, the Minister of International Cooperation, the Hon. Beverley J. Oda, established new funding mechanisms for Canadian civil society organizations (CSOs) through Partnerships with Canadians Branch (PWCB), moving from responsive programming to a competitive process. In January 2012, the Canadian Council for International Co‐operation (CCIC) and the Inter‐Council Network of Provincial/Regional Councils for International Cooperation (ICN) undertook a detailed survey to assess the experience of CSOs with six call‐for‐proposal competitions and to evaluate the impacts on the sector.
  3. 3. Survey Backgrounder (con’t)The survey had five goals:• Map the outcomes of the various calls‐for‐proposals and share these  with our constituencies;• Assess both the positive and negative aspects of the new process,  including the outcomes from the new mechanism; • Draw concrete recommendations that can be presented to CIDA and  other key decision makers to improve the competitive mechanism or  to re‐evaluate the use of the competitive process;• Use the findings to develop a collective response for the sector to  the current challenges faced by organizations with this new system;  and,• Identify a network of organizations that would be willing to share  their lessons learned with others on their submissions.
  4. 4. The RespondentsThis report is based on the responses of the 158 organizations that participated in the survey.109 proposals (52.4%) out of 208 presented to the Under and Over $2 million competitions are included in the survey. This makes it a significant sample of those most directly involved in and affected by the calls‐for‐proposals mechanism.
  5. 5. The Respondents (Con’t)60 7050 6040 50 4030 3020 2010 10 0 0 No  1‐2 3‐5 6‐15 More  Paid  than  Staff 16Number of Respondents by Staff Size Number of Respondents by Income Scale
  6. 6. Outcomes of the Call for Proposals• Close to 25% of the 158  respondents had not applied to  any of the competitions, either  • More than 70% of the sample  because they already had an  applied to one or more of the six  active contribution agreement  PWCB competitions.  with CIDA or because they were  planning to do so in the future. • Organizations that applied to more  than one competition were notably • A smaller number (11,7%) of  more successful than those that  organizations that didn’t apply  applied to only one.  say they no longer plan to seek  funding from CIDA or found the  • Both the staff size and total income  new funding  of an organization also correlate with  mechanism success.  too much work for the  • Fifteen organizations reported that  expected  they had submitted proposals as a  outcome. consortium and of these, only two  were successful. 
  7. 7. Outcomes of the Over/Under 2 M Calls• For the “Under $2 million”  competition there was a much  • For the “Under $2 million”  larger number and proportion of  competition, size and income scale  unsuccessful proposals  are less correlated to success. • The analysis of the “Over $2  • Almost all the proposals in both  million” and “Under $2 million”  competitions had a  very high  results highlights the importance  concentration in CIDA’s thematic  of staff size and income scale,  priorities but less in the countries of  particularly for the former  focus competition.
  8. 8. Impacts of the Call for Proposal System The vast majority of respondents raised serious concerns over a range of significant  and negative impacts of the new call‐for‐proposals mechanism, including:Reduced credibility of the  Pressure to change the  A heavy investment in organization with partners  organization’s priorities in  proposal development, and volunteers because of  order to meet criteria and  including consultants, the delays in funding  the need for an  overseas consultations, announcements, lack of  “acceptable” proposal,  with no assurance of any success, very significant  including restructuring  positive outcomefunding disruptions and a  overseas partnerships;reduced ability of the organization to program effectively;
  9. 9. Impacts of the Call for Proposal SystemMore emphasis on  Need to restructure the  Reduction or end to long‐fundraising in a difficult  organization, including  standing partnerships environment, with 18% of  reduction in staff and  (reported by 22 respondents having no idea  overseas activities, due to  organizations) abroad yet how they will make up  an unsuccessful proposal.  which are at the center of the loss of revenue from  civil society’s approach and CIDA; unique contribution to  development;
  10. 10. Impacts of the Call for Proposal SystemCuts to public engagement  A chill on advocacy (PE) work, with 64% of  activities as a result of the respondents indicating that  widely shared perception they would not or could  that CIDA looks unfavorably not replace previous CIDA  on organizations that do funding for PE with their  policy and advocacy work.own resources; and
  11. 11. Key ConclusionsA system that requires much improvementThe implementation of the new PWCB funding mechanism has been a difficult and challenging experience for most Canadian CSOs involved in international developmentPutting organizations, partnerships and development results in jeopardyThe sudden and drastic reduction of funds coming from CIDA – compounded by long delays in announcing funding decisions and the large number of organizations that were unsuccessful in seeing their proposals approved‐ has meant that dozens of Canadian organizations now have to reduce or end partnerships with local organizations in developing countries.
  12. 12. Key Conclusions (con’t)Canadian public awareness of and active engagement in global poverty issues is at riskThe sudden elimination of the 10% of budget previously allowable for public engagement workin the PWCB contribution agreement, and of long‐standing responsive public engagementfunding mechanisms will have significant and adverse effects on many Canadianinternational development organizations and their efforts to build awareness and sustainmeaningful engagement with Canadian citizens on global poverty issues.Recognizing the role of CSOs – development actors in their own right?Civil society organizations contribute to development in very unique, innovative and essentialways. 
  13. 13. Key Conclusions (con’t)The domino effect of losing CIDA fundingThe loss of CIDA funding by so many organizations doesn’t just impact a percentage of an Organization’s budget: it will most likely have a knock‐on effect in terms of the amount of funds that organizations can subsequently leverage from other donors: multilateral, provincial, individuals, etc..Hitting smaller organizations harder: level playing field?Smaller organizations are being hardest hit by the new funding mechanism. The survey clearly shows that organizations that have fewer staff, lower budgets and limited capacity for producing proposals, are less successful with the new PWCB mechanism.
  14. 14. Key Conclusions (con’t)Learning from what worksIt seems that the specialized calls for proposals (Haiti, Muskoka) have worked better in terms ofturn‐around‐time and improving the system as it goes. We are hoping that the same happensfor the next round of calls for proposals for the Under and Over 2 Million projects.What happened to partnerships?In the new call for proposals mechanism, not enough value is put on trust and on pre‐existingrelationships between CIDA and Canadian civil society organizations, nor on existingpartnerships between Canadian organizations and developing countries organizations.
  15. 15. Main Recommendations# 1 Produce clear and predictable annual timetables# 2 Create a two‐tiered process# 3 Make sure that the calls for proposals are more inclusive# 4 Increase opportunities to engage with CIDA
  16. 16. Main Recommendations# 5 Establish a regular and formal mechanism for ongoing  dialogue# 6 Engage in a national consultation with CIDA CSO partners  on Public Engagement mechanisms# 7 Re‐establishing some responsive programming# 8 Improve the proposal guidelines
  17. 17. Main Recommendations# 9 Create greater transparency prior to and during the  assessment process# 10 CIDA should organize capacity‐building training programs on  the calls for proposals mechanism and competitive  processes more generally# 11 Develop a CIDA policy on CSOs and development, both in  Canada and abroad# 12 Undertake a full evaluation of the impact of the call‐for‐ proposals mechanism
  18. 18. How can CCIC and the Provincial/Regional Councils be Helpful?• Advocacy ‐ Respondents felt that the  Councils are well‐positioned to represent the  voices of smaller CSOs and their southern partners to CIDA. • Training ‐ Respondents wanted the Councils to provide training or education,  particularly on proposal‐writing and navigating CIDA processes. • Communication ‐ Respondents wanted the Councils to communicate with members  and keep them updated on developments in the granting process and on what  is happening with CIDA. • Information and Analysis ‐ Further surveys and analysis by the Councils in order to  collect aggregate information on behalf of the sector.
  19. 19. THANK-YOU!
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×