Tarik Weekes - The Violence Prevention Alliance- Jamaica

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Conflict, Crime & Violence Indicators at a Local Level: Lessons on Common Indicators from the Kingston West Crime Observatory (KWCO) …

Conflict, Crime & Violence Indicators at a Local Level: Lessons on Common Indicators from the Kingston West Crime Observatory (KWCO)

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  • 1. CONFLICT, CRIME & VIOLENCE INDICATORS AT A LOCAL LEVEL: LESSONS ON COMMON INDICATORS FROM THE KINGSTON WEST CRIME OBSERVATORY (KWCO) Presented by Tarik Weekes The Violence Prevention Alliance- Jamaica Geneva, June 2013
  • 2. OUTLINE OF PRESENTATION  Objectives  Background on Jamaica  Defining: The Kingston West Crime Observatory  Focus Areas of the KWCO  Members of the KWCO  Systems of/for Reporting and Sharing Data  Visualizations ( Maps)  Challenges  Outcomes  Impact  Concluding Thoughts
  • 3. OBJECTIVES  To raise awareness of the work of the Kingston West Crime Observatory  To highlight the use of indicators and data by the Kingston West Crime Observatory to inform violence prevention programming.
  • 4. THE KINGSTON WEST CRIME OBSERVATORY- JAMAICA  Operates within one police division based in Kingston in Jamaica. An area of high levels of homicide with police and community commited to solving the problem of crime  Meets once a month with members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force, state ministries, non- governmental organizations and groups within the police division interested in violence prevention, intrested in abuilding safe communities and achieving crime reversals.  Collects data from the police- serious crimes and hospitals- violence related injuries, analyses and shares with members of the Crime Observatory Meeting Group.
  • 5. DATA COLLECTION, VALIDATION & ANALYSIS  Primary Indicators •Number of Violence Related Injuries (VRIs) include: ( relationship)where (street/home) why(fight) •Eg flight at a geographic location, with and acquataince on a the street •Number of Serious Crimes: Murder, Shooting, Rape, Robbery, Carnal Abuse. Other Indicators • Ballistics data/ data on firearm usage increases/reduction • Data from the Registrar General Department (RGD) on deaths • Increases, decreases in violent incidents within schools • Presence vs decline of involvement of gangs
  • 6.  Members of the Kingston West Crime Observatory include:  The Jamaica Constabulary Force: Community Safety Branch, Criminal Investigative Branch  The National Housing Trust  Community Development Organizations working n the division  The Ministry of Health  The Ministry of National Security  The Jamaica Fire Service  The Peace Management Initiative  Representative from the Town Council (KSAC)  Social Development Fund  Jamaica Council of Churches.  IDPs
  • 7. SYSTEMS OF/FOR REPORTING  Police Personnel working in the Divisional Intelligence Units (DIU) of the police division attend the meeting and present a data report on serious crimes committed, happening within the month.  Members of the group comment on data, forecast based on the knowledge of community stakeholders, police local knowledge and arrive at conclusions for follow thru activities and interventions.  Hotspots maps are also used to get visualization of crimes.  Newsletters
  • 8. CHALLENGES  The inability of the parish hospitals due to capacity, technology to use VRI data and access reports.  Little use of lesson learned from KWCO in guiding development of National Observatory.  The absence of a Memorandum of Understanding that would allow data to be shared within and across ministries, and housed within a single space or ministry.  Cultural factors that prevent the proper collection of data and sharing of data at the divisional level.  Technological constraints with storing and reporting on data especially at the hospital and the policy level.
  • 9. OUTCOMES  The use of VRIs total changed the complexion of crime management at the community and divisional level assisting in providing risk profiles to guide development of the police in that division with community policing and community safety strategies. Also a better understanding of the interplay between homicides and VRIs.  Increase in data on violence against women and children from hospital data.  Increaased buy in of community members as a major partner in reducing crime.  Increased training and emphasis on use of GIS by police officers at the DIU level.
  • 10. IMPACT  Increased emphasis by local authorities on the need to harmonize all data and programmes relevant to violence prevention programming.  The Establishing of a National Crime Observatory in the Ministry of National Security which presently looks at homicides per 100000 as an indicator. Capacity for further data capture to include VRIs for instance is being worked on.  Working relationship with the police and VPA/ Academicsto carry out joint operational reseach eg gang mapping
  • 11. CRIME OBSERVATORY NEWSLETTER WWW.VPAJAMAICA.COM
  • 12. WAY FORWARD  Need to use the University / Local Academics to run a reseach arm of the Observatory, The roles would include data quality control, training, monitoring and evaluation.  Need to develop rapid output from the Observatory to meet the needs of the end users on the ground, police at high command, divsional level, station level and community council level