• Save
Mark Bellis -  Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Mark Bellis - Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University

on

  • 728 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
728
Views on SlideShare
572
Embed Views
156

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 156

http://www.genevadeclaration.org 155
http://genevadeclaration.org 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • How many assaults are outside of our bars and clubsCritical as if you want other services than police to be involved you need to work in the community not the location of violence

Mark Bellis -  Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University Mark Bellis - Center for Public Health, Liverpool John Moores University Presentation Transcript

  • Violence in Perspective Views from a NationalPublic Health Observatory Professor Mark A. BellisWHO Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention Public Health Observatories of England Liverpool John Moores University
  • Centre for Public Health NationalStakeholders Observatory Public Health Observatories Network Public of England WHO Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention World Health Specialist Areas Organization Violence Alcohol Drugs National Stats Health Criminal Hospital Treatment Crime DataData Populations Emergencies Prison Deprivation and Income Deaths Sentencing Ethnicity Births Project Evaluations Surveys Drug/Alcohol Treatment British Crime Surveys Health Surveys
  • Age, Sex and Hospital Admissions for Violence 700 Deprived Males Affluent Males 600 Deprived Females hospital admissions per 100,000 per year 500 400 300 Assault and Abuse up to 10 200 times higher in poorest areas in early childhood and 100 parenting ages 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 Age Bellis et al, 2011
  • Hospitalisation for Sharp Object or Gunshot Wounds Males, rate per million population, by age and deprivation 1600 Men Deprivation quintileSharp object or gunshot wounds, rate per IMD1 deprived) 1 (least 1400 IMD2 2 1200 IMD3 3 IMD4 4 million population 1000 IMD5 deprived) 5 (most IMD5 5 (Women) 800 600 400 200 0 <15 15-24 25-34 35-54 >55 Age group Draft Analysis, HES 2000-2009
  • Assault Location Number 1-2 3-5 6-10 Area of residence Number 1-4 5-9 >10RoyalLiverpoolAED (TIIG 2008) 20% European nightlife users involved in violence - last 12 months
  • Violence - Part of a Public Health Syndrome 9.2 per 18.1 per 27.1 perViolent crime 1000 1000 1000Infant deathsChildren in povertySchool achievementTeenage pregnancyAlcohol harm(hospital stays)Mental illnessHomelessnessEarly death(heart disease/stroke)Bellis et al, Health & Place, 2011
  • Primary PreventionRisk factors for Youth Violence Key Prevention Strategies• Poor relationships with parents 1. Developing safe and stable• Child maltreatment relationships• Low academic achievement 2. Developing life and social• Low self esteem skills• Cultural tolerance of violence 3. Challenging cultural and social• High community violence norms that support violence• Easy access to weapons 4. Reducing access to lethal• High levels of weapon ownership means• Easy access to alcohol 5. Reducing availability and• Heavy alcohol use harmful use of alcohol
  • Violence Indicator Profiles for English RegionsWWW.PREVENTVIOLENCE.INFO
  • Summary• Provision of data on violence and linking violence to other key public health issues• Opportunity for services other than criminal justice to operate in prevention• Identification of social determinants in violence prevention• Provision of evidence based primary prevention• Linking of violence prevention with immediate and long term costs to health and the economy Professor Mark A. Bellis m.a.bellis@ljmu.ac.uk