Nonprofit Death and IRS Form 990
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Nonprofit Death and IRS Form 990

on

  • 723 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
723
Views on SlideShare
719
Embed Views
4

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

1 Embed 4

http://www.linkedin.com 4

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Nonprofit Death and IRS Form 990 Nonprofit Death and IRS Form 990 Presentation Transcript

  • Russell James, J.D., Ph.D., Texas Tech UniversityPredictingNonprofitCrisis &Death 
  • Why would you care? • You or your client is  considering a  substantial charitable  gift • You work or want to  work for a nonprofit • You work for a  foundation that reviews  proposals from  nonprofit organizations
  • The tools for evaluating the stability of a non‐profit are similar to the tools for evaluating a for‐profit, with some variations
  • Similar to other companies we examine• Income and income  trends• Expenditure and  expenditure trends• Net income and net  income trends• Asset/debt and  Asset/debt trends• Cash and cash trends
  • We also must understand• Permanently restricted funds• Temporarily restricted funds• Unrestricted funds
  • A restricted asset is usually one received with a donor’s requirement that it be used for a particular purpose.  If the organization violates that instruction, the donor (or donor’s heirs) have the right to demand return of the money.
  • Temporarily restricted means that the funds  are being held temporarily until they  will be spent for a  designated purpose, such as constructing a  building.Permanently restricted  means that the funds  cannot be spent, but  typically the income can be used to support  certain programs. 
  • How do you get the financial information? In cases where you  don’t have access to  internal financial  statements, you can  get the IRS form 990
  • IRS Form 990• Nonprofits with  income >$25,000  (except churches)  must file annually• Nonprofits must  provide upon request  (else IRS fines)• Available online
  • Free online sources for IRS Form 990s • www.guidestar.org (free registration required)• foundationcenter.org/findfunders/990finder/• http://nccs.urban.org/ (click on “find an  organization”)• http://www.eri‐nonprofit‐salaries.com/index.cfm  (click on “Search Form 990s)
  • Historical 990s990 forms before 2001 are generally not available onlineYou can request these from the IRS using the form at  http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs‐pdf/f4506a.pdf
  • Let’s pick a nonprofit organization and learn about it
  • Finding the 990 FormFor this example we will use:foundationcenter.org/findfunders/990finder/
  • Enter  the name
  • We get  lots of  different nonprofits  with  “Texas  Tech” in the name. So, let’s  scroll  down to  the one  we are  most interested  in…
  • Here is the Texas Tech Foundation, with about ½ billion in assets. Click on the 2010 Form 990.Notice there is a lag between fiscal year and posting of about 18‐24 months.
  • This is page 1 of the Form 990.Let’s answer some questions about the organization.
  • This form covers what period of time?
  • This form covers what period of time?September 1, 2009toAugust 31, 2010
  • What does this organization do?
  • What does this organization do?It is the foundation for Texas Tech University. 
  • How much money did the organization raise in the current year?
  • How much money did the organization raise in the current year?
  • How does this compare with the previous year?
  • How does this compare with the prior year?
  • How much money did this organization get from operations (program service revenue)?
  • How much money did this organization get from operations (program service revenue)?This is a non‐operating organization.  It simply holds, invests, and distributes money.
  • How did investments do this year as compared with last?
  • How did investments do this year as compared with last?
  • Did assets go up or down? Liabilities? Net assets?
  • Did assets go up or down? Liabilities? Net assets?
  • More detail is provided in the balance sheet (here on page 11 of the form)
  • Here we see that most assets are held in publicly traded securities
  • About $40 million is in pledges.  Charitable pledges can be legally enforced, and so must be recorded as assets.
  • What does this mean?
  • The foundation  “has”  almost  $450  million.But, it only  has  spending  authority over about$13 million. 
  • How can you tell if an organization  is dying?
  • Most people die of the same cause – lack of oxygen to the brain.All business die of the same cause – they run out of access to cash.  Nonprofits run out of access to unrestricted cash.
  • Profit is opinion. Cash is reality. Many assets are  difficult to value, e.g.,  some real estate,  “good will”, future  income streams,  pledges, special  purpose entities, etc.  Before its collapse,  Enron had great  “profits” (using hard‐ to‐value assets) but  little cash.
  • A collapsing nonprofit will burn through available cash.  Side effects include:• Spending down liquid  assets• Borrowing money• Paying bills later• Lack of investing in  tangible assets
  • Nonprofit organizations are notoriously slow at downsizing.  Consequently, falling income is particularly dangerous for nonprofits.  Watch for: • Program service revenue trends • Contributions trends • Net income trends
  • Even if a nonprofit is collapsing, it still has opportunities to turn itself around before the time runs out, depending upon its unrestricted net assets.
  • A rare, but extremely concerning, sign is the use of accounting gimmicks to present a stronger balance sheet, ex:• Assets or income  improving not from cash  but from hard‐to‐value  forms• Avoiding foreclosure  through sale and  leaseback, showing  profit from deed‐in‐lieu  of foreclosure, showing  gift income from debt  forgiveness due to  collection concerns
  • Research on   predicting  nonprofit  financial  distress
  • Tuckman & Chang  Predictor Variables• net assets / total revenues [+]• revenue concentration index defined  as [‐]• net income /total revenues [+]• administrative expenses / total  revenues [+]Tuckman, H., Chang, C., 1991. A methodology for measuring the financial vulnerability of charitable nonprofit organizations. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 20(4), 445‐ 60.
  • Altman Predictor Variables• working capital / total assets (+)• net assets divided by total assets (+)• earnings before interest and taxes / total assets (+)• total revenue / total assets (+)A model used to predict corporate bankruptcies from Altman, E., 1968. Ratios, discriminant analysis, and the prediction of corporate bankruptcy. Journal of Finance, 23(4), 589‐609.
  • Ohlson Predictor Variables• working capital / total assets [+]• size  =  ln(Total Assets/GDP price index) [+]• total liabilities / total assets [‐]• current liabilities / current assets [‐]• net income / total assets [+]• (pre‐tax income + depreciation + amortization) / total  liabilities [+]• net Income was negative for the last year [‐]• (NIt‐NIt‐1)/(|NIt|+|NIt‐1|) scaled net income growth [+]A model used to predict corporate bankruptcies from Ohlson, J., 1980. Financial ratios and the probabilistic prediction of bankruptcy. Journal of Accounting Research 18 (1), 109‐31.
  • What is the best predictor?
  • What is the best predictor?In a simultaneous test of the previous measurements, the only one that was highly significant and consistent across 4 types* of nonprofit disruption risk was negative net income in the previous year. *(1) Insolvency risk represents negative net assets  (2) Financial disruption risk represents a 25% or  more decline in net assets (3) Funding disruption  risk represents a 25% or more decline in total  revenues (4) Program disruption risk represents a  25% or more decline in program expenses; from  Elizabeth K. Keating, Mary Fischer, Teresa P. Gordon,  Janet Greenlee. (2005). Assessing Financial  Vulnerability in the Nonprofit Sector 
  • What is the best predictor?In a simultaneous test of the previous measurements, the only one that was highly significant and consistent across 4 types* of nonprofit disruption risk was negative net income in the previous year.
  • Let’s look at a small college that closed in 2008.  What early trends were cause for concern?
  • 2003Annual deficit, assets dropping, liabilities rising, unrestricted net assets becomes negativePuget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • 2004Contributions falling, program revenue falling, annual deficit, rising liabilities, falling assetsPuget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • 2005Huge contributions, Huge surplus… Really?Puget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • 2005  Religious loan provider takes deed to campus  and “gifts” the difference by forgiving the loanPuget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • 2006 New Life?  (Operating at a surplus, right?)Puget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • 2006Notice the contributions that are “non‐cash”.  What would the “surplus” have been without these?Puget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • 2006Compare the non‐cash contributions to a normal year such as 2003 or 2004, … new accounting strategy?Puget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • 2007The final year of operation.  Sale of the recently acquired property.Puget Sound Christian College (in $ thousands) Moved Closed FY  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Contributions 804 541 1,924 867 558 Cash Contributions 804 534 914 442 558 Program Service Revenue 1,519 1,361 1,212 1,282 1,176 Total Revenue 2,483 2,003 3,686 3,011 1,892 Total Expenses 3,173 2,760 2,275 2,962 2,085 Excess/Deficit ‐691 ‐757 1,412 50 ‐193 Total Assets 4,609 4,015 3,490 1,925 2,123 1,268 Total Liabilities 3,813 3,910 4,234 1,258 1,405 743 Unrestricted Net Assets 30 ‐872 ‐1765 ‐255 ‐200 ‐392 Temp Restricted 154 352 396 297 291 291 Perm Restricted 612 625 624 625 626 625
  • Once a nonprofit institution hits negative unrestricted assets, the time for a turnaround is relatively short
  • But a turnaround is still possible.
  • Central Christian College, Moberly, MO ended FY 1999 with negative unrestricted net assets after operating losses in 10 of previous 11 years.  I took over as president in the following year (FY 2000) and stayed until the first part of FY 2006. (in $ thousands)           FY  1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Contributions 1395 1660 1135 1484 1735 1087 992Program Service Revenue 1048 1079 1648 2102 2873 5500 6520 Total Revenue 2541 2882 2866 3678 4704 6721 7662 Total Expenses 1689 2114 2732 3232 3556 5573 6849 Excess/Deficit for year 852 768 134 445 1148 1148 815 Total Assets 2465 3205 4139 4345 4824 6596 7487 9079 Total Liabilities 1663 1551 1717 1789 1823 2447 2189 2966 Unrestricted Net Assets ‐10 461 1176 1811 1987 3348 4459 5242 Temporarily Restricted 237 600 536 41 293 42 47 36 Permanently Restricted 575 593 712 704 722 760 793 836
  • How financially stable are most nonprofit organizations?
  • Number of months of operating  expenses available by nonprofitsFrom: Financial Literacy and the Nonprofit Sector. (2012) The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University
  • Nonprofit Financial Vulnerability Financial  Funding  Program  Firms Insolvency Disruption disruption DisruptionArts 28,320 5.90% 16.16% 15.31% 10.88%Education 44,912 3.54% 14.23% 13.14% 9.21%Health 47,870 7.55% 13.93% 11.33% 9.74%Human  105,730 10.49% 13.99% 9.37% 7.09%ServicesReligious 13,972 5.15% 17.89% 14.79% 10.93%Other 49,775 3.82% 14.14% 18.47% 12.74%Total 290,579 7.08% 14.44% 12.67% 9.38%(1) Insolvency represents negative net assets (2) Financial disruption risk represents a 25% or more decline in net assets (3) Funding disruption risk represents a 25% or more decline in total revenues (4) Program disruption risk represents a 25% or more decline in program expenses; From: Assessing Financial Vulnerability in the Nonprofit Sector (2005) Elizabeth K. Keating, Mary Fischer, Teresa P. Gordon, Janet Greenlee
  • The Bottom LineOrganizations that consistently take in less cash than they put out are in the process of dying.  A variety of measurements can indicate trouble, but some can be intentionally skewed.  Focus on changes in cash and debt.
  • Graduate Studies inCharitable Financial Planningat Texas Tech UniversityThis slide set is from the curriculum for the Graduate Certificate in Charitable Financial Planning at Texas Tech University, home to the nation’s largest graduate program in personal financial planning.To find out more about the online Graduate Certificate in Charitable Financial Planning go to www.EncourageGenerosity.comTo find out more about the M.S. or Ph.D. in personal financial planning at Texas Tech University, go to www.depts.ttu.edu/pfp/
  • About the Author  Me (about 5 years ago)Russell James, J.D., Ph.D., CFP® is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies in Charitable Planning in the Departmentof Personal Financial Planning at Texas Tech University.  He graduated, cum laude, from the University of Missouri School of Law where he was a member of the Missouri Law Review. While in law school he received the  Lecturing in Germany.  75 extra students United Missouri Bank Award for Most  showed up.  I thought it was for me until I Outstanding Work in Gift and Estate Taxation  found out there was free beer afterwards.and Planning and the American Jurisprudence Award for Most Outstanding Work in Federal  At Giving Korea 2010.  I Income Taxation. After graduation, he worked  didn’t notice until later as the Director of Planned Giving for Central  the projector was Christian College, Moberly, Missouri for six  shining on my head years and also built a successful law practice  (inter‐cultural height limited to estate and gift planning. He later  problems).served as president of the college for more than five years, where he had direct and supervisory responsibility for all fundraising. Dr. James received his Ph.D. in Consumer & Family Economics from the University of Missouri where his dissertation was on the topic of charitable giving.  Dr. James has over 100 publications in print or in press in academic journals, conference proceedings, professional periodicals, and books.  He has been quoted in a variety of news outlets including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, U.S. News & World Reports, Associate Press, and USA Today.