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Charitable Giving 2011 Tax Tips, Techniques, Trends and Tomorrow<br />Russell James, J.D., Ph.D., CFP®<br />Associate Prof...
EncourageGenerosity.com<br />New Graduate Certificate in Charitable Financial Planning at Texas Tech University<br /><ul><...
No entrance exam (unless continuing for the M.S.)
On-campus or on-line</li></ul>Free CFRE or CFP continuing education hours online <br />Coming Soon: Research in Fundraisin...
2011 special tax opportunities<br />IRA qualified charitable distributions (QCDs)<br />Roth IRA conversions<br />Low inter...
Life stages of a retirement account<br />Early distribution (before 59 ½)<br />Regular distribution (59 ½ to 70 ½)<br />Re...
Giving after 70 ½ <br />After age 70 ½ participants must take required minimum distributions (account balance / remaining ...
Giving after 70 ½ <br />For 2011, congress extended the Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD): counts toward required mi...
Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD)<br />No private foundations, donor advised funds, charitable trusts, or charitable...
Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdr...
Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdr...
Roth conversions and charitable planning can work together to match<br />Deductions<br />Income<br />
Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdr...
Where can I find offsetting deductions?<br />
Where can I find offsetting deductions?<br /><ul><li>Direct charitable gift
Charitable remainder trust
Charitable lead trust (grantor)
Charitable gift annuity
Donor advised fund
Private foundation</li></ul>Or give a remainder interest in a residence or farmland to a charity<br />
Charitable deductions may be limited (with five year carryover) to 20%, 30%, or 50% of income depending on gift and recipi...
If I have unused deductions, how can I pull future income into current year?<br />
If I have unused deductions, how can I pull future income into current year?<br />With a Roth conversion<br />
Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdr...
Roth conversions and charitable planning can work together to match<br />Deductions<br />Income<br />
Where can I find offsetting deductions?<br /><ul><li>Direct charitable gift
Charitable remainder trust
Charitable lead trust (grantor)
Charitable gift annuity
Donor advised fund
Private foundation</li></ul>Or give a remainder interest in a residence or farmland to a charity<br />
Charitable gift of remainder interests in homes and farms<br />
A remainder interest gives the right to own the property after a set time or after the death of a person<br />OK, <br />yo...
Charitable Deduction<br />Interest Rates<br />
Deduction for remainder interest in $100,000 of farm land by <br />age 59 donor<br />1.8% (Dec 10) $68,233<br />11.6% (May...
Unlike a will, a remainder interest is not revocable, and can even be sold<br />Remainder  <br />Interest<br />
A deductible remainder interest in farmland or a home must be transferred by deed, not by  trust or contract<br />
A farm is any land and improvements used <br />(even by a tenant) <br />to raise crops or livestock<br />
A remainder interest in any part of a farm may be gifted<br /> (Rev. Rul. 78-303)<br />
12.5%<br />25%<br />Can I give a remainder interest of an undivided share in farmland?<br />
12.5%<br />25%<br />Yes, donor may deduct a remainder interest shared by charity and others as tenants in common (Rev. Rul...
12.5%<br />25%<br />However, IRS may deduct cost of partitioning (of forcing a sale or division)<br />
No deduction for remainder just in mineral rights because it is not a “farm” Reg. 1.170A-7(b)(4)<br />Can gift remainder i...
How do you calculate the deduction for a remainder interest in farmland?<br />Find the §7520 interest rate (http://www.irs...
Ex: A remainder interest in $100,000 of farmland given by a 59 year old donor 12/10<br />Find the §7520 interest rate (htt...
Ex: A remainder interest in $100,000 of farmland given by a 59 year old donor 12/10<br />Find the §7520 interest rate (htt...
Leaving land to charity<br />by will<br />Revocable<br />$0 income tax deduction<br />Impacts charity after death<br />Lea...
Because farmland can be gifted in parts, a donor could annually give remainder interests up to income limits or desired <b...
Avoids risk of losing carryover deduction at death
Could use value of annual deductions to pay for ILIT life insurance passing tax free to heirs</li></li></ul><li>Donor can ...
Age 59 wealthy donor with $100,000 farmland on 12/10<br />remainder interest in farmland given to charity <br />will divid...
Gifts of remainder interests in personal residences can also be deducted<br />Remainder  <br />Interest<br />
Includes second homes, vacation homes, even a boat with bathroom, cooking, and sleeping facilities, if used by the donor a...
Deduction for a house is reduced because, unlike land, it is depreciable (it wears out) <br />Rules in IRS Pub. 1459 http:...
59 year old donor giving on 9/6/10<br />Remainder interest in $100,000 farm<br />.68233 x $100,000 <br />$68,233 Deduction...
Depreciation reduction factor<br />R factor age now – R factor age after useful life of house<br />D factor age now X Usef...
What if the donor leaves?<br />
What if the donor leaves?<br />Give life estate to charity<br />Agree with the charity to a joint sale and divide proceeds...
What if I make improvements to the property after giving a remainder interest?<br />
You can deduct the remainder value of major improvements as additional gifts <br />PLR 9329017; PLR 8529014<br />$8,000 fo...
Charitable Remainder Trusts<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />Paymen...
The donor sets aside money from which he takes payments, with any remaining amount going to charity<br />Anything Left at ...
Payments can go to the donor, other people, or other people and charity<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<...
Payments can be for donor’s life or for as many lives as desired or for 20 years or less<br />Anything Left at Death<br />...
Payments can be a fixed dollar amount: Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust (CRAT)<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial ...
Payments can be a fixed percentage (5%-50%) of all trust assets: Charitable Remainder UniTrust (CRUT)<br />Anything Left a...
The donor can give cash or property (usually appreciated securities)<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br ...
The rules of a Charitable Remainder Trust cannot be changed<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<b...
The donor may act as CRT trustee and manage the assets<br />
The donor may keep the right to change which charity receives money<br />
The donor receives an immediate tax deduction for the present value of the amount that may go to charity<br />Anything Lef...
With a charitable gift in a will, there is no income tax deduction<br />
There are no capital gains taxes when the donor makes a transfer to the CRT.<br />
A CRT is itself a nonprofit entity and pays no capital gains tax when it sells appreciated property<br />
A client holds a large, highly appreciated asset that generates little income (like developable land or non-dividend payin...
Option 1: Sell it. Pay the capital gains tax.  Invest the remaining amount.<br />$1,000,000 stock<br />   $900,000 gain (i...
Option 2: Transfer to a CRT<br />$1,000,000 stock<br />   $900,000 gain (if $100,000 cost)<br />_____$0 tax (CRT pays no t...
Charitable Lead Trusts<br />Initial Transfer<br />Anything <br />Left Over<br />CLT<br />Donor<br />Donor’s heirs<br />Pay...
Like a CRT where charitable and non-charitable beneficiaries switch places<br />Charitable Remainder Trust<br />Initial Tr...
A CLT locks in a stream of charitable gifting without requiring continuing requests<br />
Non-Grantor CLT: donor gives money from which charity receives payments, remaining amount returns to donor<br />Initial Tr...
The donor can immediately deduct the present value of all future projected payments to charity in a grantor CLT<br />Initi...
I give property to fund $10,000/year gifts for 20 years through a 20-year grantor CLAT that returns remainder to me.  I de...
Future demographic trends in estate giving<br />
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2011 Charitable Taxes & Trends

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A summary presentation to a local AFP chapter on taxes and demographic trends in 2011

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Transcript of "2011 Charitable Taxes & Trends"

  1. 1. Charitable Giving 2011 Tax Tips, Techniques, Trends and Tomorrow<br />Russell James, J.D., Ph.D., CFP®<br />Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Charitable Financial Planning<br /> Division of Personal Financial Planning - Texas Tech University<br />www.EncourageGenerosity.com<br />
  2. 2. EncourageGenerosity.com<br />New Graduate Certificate in Charitable Financial Planning at Texas Tech University<br /><ul><li>12 graduate credit hours
  3. 3. No entrance exam (unless continuing for the M.S.)
  4. 4. On-campus or on-line</li></ul>Free CFRE or CFP continuing education hours online <br />Coming Soon: Research in Fundraising Podcasts<br />
  5. 5. 2011 special tax opportunities<br />IRA qualified charitable distributions (QCDs)<br />Roth IRA conversions<br />Low interest rates<br />
  6. 6. Life stages of a retirement account<br />Early distribution (before 59 ½)<br />Regular distribution (59 ½ to 70 ½)<br />Required minimum distribution (after 70 ½) <br />
  7. 7. Giving after 70 ½ <br />After age 70 ½ participants must take required minimum distributions (account balance / remaining life expectancy) or pay 50% penalty<br />$10,000<br />IRA<br />$10,000 income<br />
  8. 8. Giving after 70 ½ <br />For 2011, congress extended the Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD): counts toward required minimum distribution without income or deduction<br />$0 income<br />$0 deduction<br />IRA<br />$10,000<br />
  9. 9. Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD)<br />No private foundations, donor advised funds, charitable trusts, or charitable gift annuities<br />IRAs or IRA rollovers only; no 401(k), 403(b), SEP, SIMPLE, pension or profit sharing plans<br />Participant 70 ½ or older<br />$0 income<br />$0 deduction<br />IRA<br />$100,000 per person maximum<br />$10,000<br />
  10. 10. Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdraws are tax free)<br />In 2011 no income limits for Roth conversions<br />
  11. 11. Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdraws are tax free)<br />Conversion creates $1MM in immediate taxable income<br />
  12. 12. Roth conversions and charitable planning can work together to match<br />Deductions<br />Income<br />
  13. 13. Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdraws are tax free)<br />Conversion creates $1MM in immediate taxable income<br />
  14. 14. Where can I find offsetting deductions?<br />
  15. 15. Where can I find offsetting deductions?<br /><ul><li>Direct charitable gift
  16. 16. Charitable remainder trust
  17. 17. Charitable lead trust (grantor)
  18. 18. Charitable gift annuity
  19. 19. Donor advised fund
  20. 20. Private foundation</li></ul>Or give a remainder interest in a residence or farmland to a charity<br />
  21. 21. Charitable deductions may be limited (with five year carryover) to 20%, 30%, or 50% of income depending on gift and recipient<br />
  22. 22. If I have unused deductions, how can I pull future income into current year?<br />
  23. 23. If I have unused deductions, how can I pull future income into current year?<br />With a Roth conversion<br />
  24. 24. Tax Free<br />Roth Conversion<br />Taxable<br />$1MM in standard IRA (withdraws are taxable)<br />$1MM in Roth IRA (withdraws are tax free)<br />Conversion creates $1MM in immediate taxable income<br />
  25. 25. Roth conversions and charitable planning can work together to match<br />Deductions<br />Income<br />
  26. 26. Where can I find offsetting deductions?<br /><ul><li>Direct charitable gift
  27. 27. Charitable remainder trust
  28. 28. Charitable lead trust (grantor)
  29. 29. Charitable gift annuity
  30. 30. Donor advised fund
  31. 31. Private foundation</li></ul>Or give a remainder interest in a residence or farmland to a charity<br />
  32. 32. Charitable gift of remainder interests in homes and farms<br />
  33. 33. A remainder interest gives the right to own the property after a set time or after the death of a person<br />OK, <br />you can have my stuff now.<br />Charles A. Donor<br />
  34. 34. Charitable Deduction<br />Interest Rates<br />
  35. 35. Deduction for remainder interest in $100,000 of farm land by <br />age 59 donor<br />1.8% (Dec 10) $68,233<br />11.6% (May 89) $15,684<br />
  36. 36. Unlike a will, a remainder interest is not revocable, and can even be sold<br />Remainder <br />Interest<br />
  37. 37. A deductible remainder interest in farmland or a home must be transferred by deed, not by trust or contract<br />
  38. 38. A farm is any land and improvements used <br />(even by a tenant) <br />to raise crops or livestock<br />
  39. 39. A remainder interest in any part of a farm may be gifted<br /> (Rev. Rul. 78-303)<br />
  40. 40. 12.5%<br />25%<br />Can I give a remainder interest of an undivided share in farmland?<br />
  41. 41. 12.5%<br />25%<br />Yes, donor may deduct a remainder interest shared by charity and others as tenants in common (Rev. Rule 87-37) <br />
  42. 42. 12.5%<br />25%<br />However, IRS may deduct cost of partitioning (of forcing a sale or division)<br />
  43. 43. No deduction for remainder just in mineral rights because it is not a “farm” Reg. 1.170A-7(b)(4)<br />Can gift remainder in entire “fee simple” farm (even if land and mineral rights go to separate charities) PLR 8316037<br />Can gift remainder in farm without mineral rights if you don’t owned them <br />mineral rights<br />
  44. 44. How do you calculate the deduction for a remainder interest in farmland?<br />Find the §7520 interest rate (http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=112482,00.html)<br />Multiply value of land by remainder percentage in IRS Pub. 1457 (one or two lives or specific term) (http://www.irs.gov/retirement/article/0,,id=206601,00.html)<br />
  45. 45. Ex: A remainder interest in $100,000 of farmland given by a 59 year old donor 12/10<br />Find the §7520 interest rate (http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=112482,00.html)<br />1.8%<br />
  46. 46. Ex: A remainder interest in $100,000 of farmland given by a 59 year old donor 12/10<br />Find the §7520 interest rate (http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=112482,00.html)<br />Multiply value of land by remainder percentage in IRS Pub. 1457 (one or two lives or specific term) (http://www.irs.gov/retirement/article/0,,id=206601,00.html)<br />1.8%<br /> $100,000<br /> X 0.68233 <br />= $68,233<br />
  47. 47. Leaving land to charity<br />by will<br />Revocable<br />$0 income tax deduction<br />Impacts charity after death<br />Leaving land to charity<br />by remainder interest<br />Irrevocable<br />$68,233 immediate income tax deduction<br />Impacts charity after death or immediately if charity sells remainder interest<br />
  48. 48. Because farmland can be gifted in parts, a donor could annually give remainder interests up to income limits or desired <br />marginal tax rate<br /><ul><li>Allows for increasing valuation each year
  49. 49. Avoids risk of losing carryover deduction at death
  50. 50. Could use value of annual deductions to pay for ILIT life insurance passing tax free to heirs</li></li></ul><li>Donor can use money from remainder tax deduction to buy tax free life insurance (ILIT) for children’s inheritance<br />IRS <br />Cash Back<br />Tax Free From ILIT<br />
  51. 51. Age 59 wealthy donor with $100,000 farmland on 12/10<br />remainder interest in farmland given to charity <br />will divides farmland 10% to charity 90% to children<br />$68,233 tax deduction x 35% combined tax rate = $23,881<br />$23,881 buys est. $70,000 paid up ILIT life insurance<br />farmland worth $125,000 at death<br />children receive $70,000 <br />(tax free from ILIT)<br />charity receives $12,500 <br />(10% x $125,000)<br />children receive $50,625 <br />(90% x 125,000 = 112,500, less 55% for post ‘12 estate taxes)<br />charity receives $125,000 farmland <br />
  52. 52. Gifts of remainder interests in personal residences can also be deducted<br />Remainder <br />Interest<br />
  53. 53. Includes second homes, vacation homes, even a boat with bathroom, cooking, and sleeping facilities, if used by the donor as a residence<br />
  54. 54. Deduction for a house is reduced because, unlike land, it is depreciable (it wears out) <br />Rules in IRS Pub. 1459 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p1459.pdf<br />
  55. 55. 59 year old donor giving on 9/6/10<br />Remainder interest in $100,000 farm<br />.68233 x $100,000 <br />$68,233 Deduction <br />Remainder interest in $100,000 home<br />.68233 x $20,000 (land)<br />.68233 x $10,000 (salvage)<br />.41412*x $70,000<br />$49,458 Deduction<br />*.68233 less .26821 depreciation <br />reduction<br />calculated<br />on next<br />slide<br />
  56. 56. Depreciation reduction factor<br />R factor age now – R factor age after useful life of house<br />D factor age now X Useful life of house<br />Appraiser can estimate. IRS examples use 45 years.<br />263478.6-60.91156<br />21825.1-45<br />=.26821<br />Table C at http://www.irs.gov/retirement/article/0,,id=206601,00.html<br />
  57. 57. What if the donor leaves?<br />
  58. 58. What if the donor leaves?<br />Give life estate to charity<br />Agree with the charity to a joint sale and divide proceeds<br />Give life estate to charity in exchange for a gift annuity<br />Rent property<br />Sell life estate<br />
  59. 59. What if I make improvements to the property after giving a remainder interest?<br />
  60. 60. You can deduct the remainder value of major improvements as additional gifts <br />PLR 9329017; PLR 8529014<br />$8,000 for new HVAC <br />
  61. 61. Charitable Remainder Trusts<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />Payments During Life<br />Dr. Russell James<br />Texas Tech University<br />
  62. 62. The donor sets aside money from which he takes payments, with any remaining amount going to charity<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />Payments During Life<br />
  63. 63. Payments can go to the donor, other people, or other people and charity<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />5% of trust assets<br />
  64. 64. Payments can be for donor’s life or for as many lives as desired or for 20 years or less<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />Payments during life or lives<br />
  65. 65. Payments can be a fixed dollar amount: Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust (CRAT)<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />$1,000 Per Year for Life<br />
  66. 66. Payments can be a fixed percentage (5%-50%) of all trust assets: Charitable Remainder UniTrust (CRUT)<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />5% of trust assets<br />
  67. 67. The donor can give cash or property (usually appreciated securities)<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />5% of trust assets<br />
  68. 68. The rules of a Charitable Remainder Trust cannot be changed<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />5% of trust assets<br />
  69. 69. The donor may act as CRT trustee and manage the assets<br />
  70. 70. The donor may keep the right to change which charity receives money<br />
  71. 71. The donor receives an immediate tax deduction for the present value of the amount that may go to charity<br />Anything Left at Death<br />Initial Transfer<br />Donor<br />Charity<br />CRT<br />Payments During Life<br />
  72. 72. With a charitable gift in a will, there is no income tax deduction<br />
  73. 73. There are no capital gains taxes when the donor makes a transfer to the CRT.<br />
  74. 74. A CRT is itself a nonprofit entity and pays no capital gains tax when it sells appreciated property<br />
  75. 75. A client holds a large, highly appreciated asset that generates little income (like developable land or non-dividend paying stock). How can she convert it to income generating property?<br />
  76. 76. Option 1: Sell it. Pay the capital gains tax. Invest the remaining amount.<br />$1,000,000 stock<br /> $900,000 gain (if $100,000 cost)<br />$135,000 tax (15% fed)<br />$865,000 left to invest<br />
  77. 77. Option 2: Transfer to a CRT<br />$1,000,000 stock<br /> $900,000 gain (if $100,000 cost)<br />_____$0 tax (CRT pays no tax)<br />$1,000,000 left to invest<br />
  78. 78. Charitable Lead Trusts<br />Initial Transfer<br />Anything <br />Left Over<br />CLT<br />Donor<br />Donor’s heirs<br />Payments for Life/Years<br />Charity<br />Dr. Russell James<br />Texas Tech University<br />
  79. 79. Like a CRT where charitable and non-charitable beneficiaries switch places<br />Charitable Remainder Trust<br />Initial Transfer<br />Anything <br />Left Over<br />Charity<br />Donor<br />Donor or heirs<br />Payments for Life/Years<br />Initial Transfer<br />Anything <br />Left Over<br />Donor or heirs<br />Charitable Lead Trust<br />Donor<br />Payments for Life/Years<br />Charity<br />
  80. 80. A CLT locks in a stream of charitable gifting without requiring continuing requests<br />
  81. 81. Non-Grantor CLT: donor gives money from which charity receives payments, remaining amount returns to donor<br />Initial Transfer<br />Anything <br />Left Over<br />CLT <br />(Grantor)<br />Donor<br />Payments for Years<br />Charity<br />
  82. 82. The donor can immediately deduct the present value of all future projected payments to charity in a grantor CLT<br />Initial Transfer<br />Projected Value of Future Charitable Gifts<br />Anything <br />Left Over<br />Donor<br />Payments for Life or Years<br />Charity<br />
  83. 83. I give property to fund $10,000/year gifts for 20 years through a 20-year grantor CLAT that returns remainder to me. I deduct present value of $10,000/year for 20 years based on §7520 rate.<br /> At 2%, deduction is $163,515<br /> At 8%, deduction is $98,181<br />Initial Transfer<br />Anything <br />Left Over<br />Donor<br />$10,000 Payments for 20 years<br />Charity<br />
  84. 84. Future demographic trends in estate giving<br />
  85. 85. The Fall and Rise in Live Births - US<br />
  86. 86. Dramatic increases on the horizon<br />Temporary drop in key demographic population<br />
  87. 87. Charitable Estate Planning among US Adults Aged 55-65<br />
  88. 88. Increases in charitable planning are driven by increases in childlessness and education<br />Time trend disappears when including childlessness and education<br />Time trend exists<br />Probit analysis of all respondents age 55-65 in 1996-2006 HRS. Outcome variable is the presence of charitable estate planning. <br />
  89. 89. Among Donors ($500+) with an Estate Plan<br />
  90. 90. Regression: Compare only otherwise identical people <br />Example: The effect of differences in education among those making the same income, with the same wealth, same family structure, etc.<br />
  91. 91. Likelihood of having a charitable plan(comparing otherwise identical individuals)<br />Graduate degree (v. high school) +4.2 % points<br />Gives $500+ per year to charity +3.1 % points<br />Volunteers regularly +2.0 % points<br />College degree (v. high school) +1.7 % points<br />Has been diagnosed with a stroke +1.7 % points<br />Is ten years older +1.2 % points<br />Has been diagnosed with cancer +0.8 % points<br />Is married (v. unmarried) +0.7 % points<br />Diagnosed with a heart condition +0.4 % points<br />Attends church 1+ times per month +0.2 % points<br />Has $1,000,000 more in assets +0.1 % points<br />Has $100,000 per year more income not significant<br />Is male (v. female) not significant<br />Has only children (v. no offspring) -2.8 % points<br />Has grandchildren (v. no offspring) -10.5 % points<br />
  92. 92. Find your estate donor…<br />
  93. 93. An Australian study by Christopher <br />Baker including 1729 wills:<br />“Australian will-makers without surviving children are ten times more likely to make a charitable gift from their estate”<br />
  94. 94. Both childlessness and college education among women entering the 55-65 age group over the next decade will be substantially higher<br />
  95. 95. After making their plan, charitable estate donors grew their estates 50%-100% faster than did others with same initial wealth<br />
  96. 96. Big trend “take-aways”<br />Don’t recruit estate givers just by giving level, also know your childless donors<br />After making their intention, charitable estate donors grew their estates 50%-100% faster than did others<br />Future demographics are positive based on population, childlessness, and education<br />
  97. 97. Check out the new program! <br />EncourageGenerosity.com<br />Online Graduate Certificate in Charitable Financial Planning<br />Free CFRE & CFP Continuing Education<br />Coming Soon: Latest Academic Research and Theory in Fundraising<br />Russell James, J.D., Ph.D., CFP®, Associate Professor, Texas Tech University<br />
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