Teacher Artist Partnership Programme: international seminar introduction, 28th April 2007

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Introduction to the UK context for creative and cultural partnership, for an international seminar in London as part of the Teacher-Artist Partnership programme (www.tapprogramme.org)

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  • Teacher Artist Partnership Programme: international seminar introduction, 28th April 2007

    1. 1. TEACHER ARTIST PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMME International Seminar 26 - 28 April 2007
    2. 2. The UK: education policy <ul><li>Different frameworks in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland </li></ul><ul><li>National curriculum 5 - 16 years Strong focus on measuring attainment, assessment by testing and performance indicators </li></ul><ul><li>Public examinations every 2/3 yrs from age 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development linked to teacher workforce ‘standards’ (implications for pay and conditions) Government policy - ‘Every Child Matters’ and ‘Extended Schools’: New Labour rhetoric of ‘social inclusion’, enterprise, ‘active citizenship’ and partnership </li></ul><ul><li>Now ‘creativity’ has been added to the mix </li></ul>
    3. 3. Educational Structures in the UK <ul><li>Early years (2 -5): mixture of provision: private, voluntary, state </li></ul><ul><li>Primary schools 5 - 11 </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary schools 11 - 16 or 11 - 18. Diverse range of types of schools - increasingly ‘specialist’ but generally non-selective. Not everyone goes to their local school. Rhetoric of ‘parental choice’ can lead to problems of equity and equal opportunity. </li></ul><ul><li>Further education 16 - 19 - stronger focus on learning skills for work </li></ul><ul><li>Big investment in new buildings and resources with ‘partnership’ one of the key words </li></ul><ul><li>Education is a massive part of the UK economy </li></ul>
    4. 4. Underlying agendas… <ul><li>Considerable pressure from government to diversify sources of income, develop public-private partnerships and involve business in education. Continual qualifications reform. </li></ul><ul><li>Funding comes through local authorities but schools are expected to raise money from other sources </li></ul><ul><li>Arts education more central than it used to be, but questions of creative learning remain… </li></ul><ul><li>How to develop a ‘relevant’ curriculum which responds to cultural diversity and socio-economic inequality, particularly in complex urban settings like London </li></ul>
    5. 5. creative partnerships in education
    6. 6. different contexts, different rhetorics… but becoming more prominent in policy. So… more money? more professional development? more research needed?
    7. 7. Provided by: Arts Education Agencies Schools. Colleges and universities Creative Partnerships Community organisations Artists and arts organisations Cultural and creative industries Funded by: Central government schemes Arts Council England Trusts & Foundations Urban Regeneration Initiatives Local Education Authorities EU resources
    8. 8. Creative partnerships in the networked city take many different forms, for example… <ul><li>Museum and gallery ‘outreach’ </li></ul><ul><li>Work in neighbourhoods for festivals and events </li></ul><ul><li>Educational work in hospitals, prisons and social services </li></ul><ul><li>Work designed to support the school curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Projects designed to develop innovation and imaginative play </li></ul><ul><li>New media creates possibilities for rapid communication and connectivity </li></ul>
    9. 9. Policy & Practice: dilemmas <ul><li>What is creativity in education for ? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the roles of the artist in school? </li></ul><ul><li>Who gets to be an artist in school? Children? Teachers? Visiting artists? How do we make those relationships work? </li></ul><ul><li>Where can learning in the arts take place? How can a school connect with cultural organisations and the work of artists? </li></ul><ul><li>What do teachers, artists and students need to let creativity flourish? </li></ul>
    10. 10. policy and practice: what is needed <ul><li>Partnerships - to take learning beyond the classroom setting </li></ul><ul><li>Creating more ‘authentic’ contexts for learning </li></ul><ul><li>new ways of thinking about teaching, learning and leadership </li></ul><ul><li>New models for professional development of artists and teachers, working together on shared questions and concerns </li></ul>
    11. 11. This has major implications for how cultural learning happens both in schools and other institutions - museums, galleries, theatres, etc. This means: <ul><li>focusing on quality of relationships (building trust) open and flexible institutions people need skills in connecting, brokering, mediation, conflict resolution </li></ul><ul><li>new kinds of cultural and educational organisations that enable people to make connections and which work through networks in cities and communities </li></ul>
    12. 12. Some implications: we need to <ul><li>understand organisational and interpersonal dynamics and motivations acknowledge power relationships, be prepared to be self-critical and engage strategically with policy and politics from where we are </li></ul><ul><li>be flexible but not exploitative with time, space and staffing </li></ul><ul><li>have a commitment to collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>be analytical about what we mean by ‘partnership’ </li></ul>
    13. 13. the TAPP approach… <ul><li>Partnership learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative and interdisciplinary arts practice </li></ul><ul><li>Principle of experimentation and reflection, rather than fixed outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Learning through projects which take place over time </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities for professional learning and exchange at every level - staff and students </li></ul><ul><li>International dimension - building networks for change </li></ul><ul><li>Develops learner flexibility, collaboration and risk-taking..teachers, artists and students learning together </li></ul>
    14. 14. Issues… <ul><li>Funders/policy makers have difficulty matching this level of integration - causes tensions and difficulties </li></ul><ul><li>Reconciliation of democratic values and collaborative practices with target driven accountability cultures of public services </li></ul><ul><li>Starting small and working at an appropriate scale, but sharing knowledge widely </li></ul><ul><li>How to take appropriate risks in a risk-averse public sector culture </li></ul>
    15. 15. TAPP - A year-long action research programme 12 teaching sessions (one residential) 12 teachers/12 artists personalised learning observations of practice artists and teachers in a joint programme cerebral/theoretical content international exchange tutorial support portfolio submissions accredited by institute of Education, University of London
    16. 16. Who is TAPP? <ul><li>London International Festival of Theatre </li></ul><ul><li>Guildhall School of Music and Drama </li></ul><ul><li>Newham Sixth Form College </li></ul><ul><li>CapeUK </li></ul><ul><li>Animarts </li></ul><ul><li>Proactive Learning from Early Years </li></ul>… and a network of practitioners, artists and teachers working … funded by a mixture of government, trusts and foundations … involved in these debates and issues in many different settings
    17. 17. TAPP <ul><li>Deliberately brings people together across different sectors of education (early years, primary, secondary, further education and universities) </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberately encourages artists and teachers with different disciplinary backgrounds to discuss shared concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Is committed to the principle of collaborative and student-centred learning, with participants’ own creativity at the centre of the learning experience </li></ul>
    18. 18. The purpose of this seminar… To exchange perspectives on and experiences of arts education in Europe To seed new collaborations and dialogues To work within a shared learning framework To explore what creative pedagogy means To explore how partnerships between teachers and artists work in a wide variety of settings
    19. 19. For TAPP Beth Martin Coordinator Jenny Maddox Administrator Anna Ledgard Lead Tutor Graham Jeffery Tutor Tony Fegan Tutor Lesley Hutchison research/evaluation David Jenkins research/evaluation Aylwyn Walsh research assistant/Lift Placement Pat Cochrane CAPEUK Lesley Burgess Institute of Education Alessio Romani Interpreter Emma Pooley Volunteer Ines Tercio Interpreter Rachel Fell Interpreter www.tapprogramme.org [email_address]

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