QR CODES IN AN ACADEMIC SETTING
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

QR CODES IN AN ACADEMIC SETTING

on

  • 2,623 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,623
Views on SlideShare
2,551
Embed Views
72

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
126
Comments
0

2 Embeds 72

http://godick.maxcell.org 71
http://www.twylah.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Introduce yourself
  • Intro slide (Missy): How many people in the room have a smart phone?
  • Add slideshare QR Code at the top of this slide
  • If your library uses Google Analytics, you can look under VISITORS  MOBILE  MOBILE DEVICES to see how many people are visiting your site using smartphones. As you can see here, mobile phones account for over 24 thousand visits, which is only 0.79% of the site total.
  • The number of new iPhone visitors more than doubled; the number of people accessing the site via Android grew by over 300%. This screen shot is sorted by Visitor type, then operating system.
  • Now, this leads us to our first question: if the only people who can use QR codes are those with smartphones, how big an audience are we talking about? How can you get a feel for who would be reading these codes and how they would be accessing your site?
  • Scott
  • They can be displayed on those floors with no service desks. For those times of the year when every computer is taken, but what the student needs can easily be accessed via phone People who will not stop to write down a long URL will take 15 seconds to snap a picture on their phone For instance, many students’ phones do double-duty as an mp3 player, complete with earbuds—why not take advantage of that with audio tours? Paper bookmarks, flyers, newspaper ads—all are commonly used in the presence of a phone, but not necessarily a computer.
  • Scott
  • Scott
  • http://catalogue.library.ryerson.ca/search/X?SEARCH=The+Blank+Swan http://www.ryerson.ca/library/qr/ n the Library catalogue, scanning the QR code will let you quickly capture the title, location and call number of any item you wish to find and save it on your phone.
  • http://catalogue.library.ryerson.ca/search/X?SEARCH=The+Blank+Swan http://www.ryerson.ca/library/qr/ n the Library catalogue, scanning the QR code will let you quickly capture the title, location and call number of any item you wish to find and save it on your phone.
  • http://www.qrchocolates.com/
  • Scott

QR CODES IN AN ACADEMIC SETTING QR CODES IN AN ACADEMIC SETTING Presentation Transcript

  • QR Codes in an Academic Setting University of Central Florida Libraries Aysegul Kapucu & Rebecca Murphey August 12, 2011
  • Agenda
    • INTRODUCTION:
      • What do they look like?
      • What are QR codes?
    • Who is your audience?
      • Smartphone users
        • your students
        • & you
        • How do you read them?
      • QR code readers apps
      • Demonstration
      • What can a QR code do?
      • How do you make them?
      • QR code generator
    • How are libraries using QR codes?
      • UCF Libraries’ QR Code Examples
      • Other Libraries’ Examples
    • Pros, Cons & Issues
    • Best Practices
    • Additional Resources
  • What do they look like? HOW TO: Make Your QR Codes More Beautiful http://www.sq1agency.com/blog/?p=2719
  • What are QR Codes?
    • QR = “Quick Response”
    • Created by a Toyota subsidiary in 1994; used for tracking automobile parts
    • QR codes are read in two directions, store more data
      • Linear=up to 20 digits
      • QR=over 4000 characters
    • Free to use and create
    Background How it works The Nuts and Bolts of #QR Codes David Hopkins Bournemouth University
  • Know your audience
    • Google Analytics can help!
  • See the increase in one year! 49% of American ages 18-24 now own a smartphone! PewInternet.org, July 11, 2011
  • What about you?
    • Who here has a smart phone?
    • Who has some kind of barcode reader app on their phone?
    • Who has read a QR code on their phone?
    • Who has created a QR code?
  • How do you read them?
    • There is an app for that….
    • People with smart phones and an internet connection can take a snapshot of the code and find out what it says.
    • Get a smartphone
    • Get a barcode reader
    • Scan the barcode
    • See what happens!
  • #2 Get a barcode reader
    • Make sure you get one that fits your operating system (OS) AND your phone make and model.
    • iCandy – Commercially tagged codes
    • BarDeCo – Decoder app for Chrome
    • QRreader —requires Adobe AIR + webcam
    • QuickMark —1D and 2D code support, webcam, drag-n-drop or screen capture
    Desktop Readers/decoders
    • See http://www.mobile-barcodes.com/ to see what is most compatible with your phone
    • Apple App Store
      • NeoReader, Optiscan, Zappit
    • Android Market
      • Zxing Barcode Scanner
    • Multiple OS
      • Kaywa , i-nigma , QuickMark
    Smartphone Readers
  • Demonstration
  • What can a QR code do?
      • Point to a URL (web address)
      • Text
      • Phone number
      • SMS/Text Message
      • vCard
      • Geolocation
      • Wifi login
      • Social (e.g.,Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn)
  • So why use QR codes?
    • For places in the library with no computers
    • For times when computers are inaccessible
    • For people on-the-go
    • For directing people to resources that are best used on a mobile device
    • For making the most of your print media
  • Why would you NOT use them?
    • Many people still are not using smartphones—would you be alienating that portion of your clientelle?
    • Will they still be around in 5 years? 5 months?
      • PRNewser poll (pictured, left) is undecided.
  • Just go ahead and DO IT
    • QR codes are the only thing you’ll find where you can have all three!
  • How do you make them?
    • Users can generate and print their own QR codes for others to scan and use by visiting one of several free QR code generating sites.
      • Browser plug-ins usually generate code with no analytics available
      • Websites often require registration, and provide limited analytics for free
          • Bit.ly
          • goo.gl URS Shortener
          • createqrcode
          • Zxing
          • Kaywa
          • Beetag
          • Snap-Vu
          • Qrstuff
    QR Code Generators
    • Firefox: QR Link Maker
    • Chrome: QR Code Tag Extension
    Generator Browser Plug-Ins
  • UCF Libraries
    • QR codes examples
  • Mobile Friendly Library Website
  • Browsing Collection: QR codes on books
  • Browsing Collection: QR codes on books
  • Browsing Collection: QR codes on books
  • New Books shelf
  • PURL database
  • Exhibits
  • Internal Signage
  • Special Events: Birthdays
  • Special Events: MLIS Day Event
  • Other Libraries
    • QR codes examples
    Library Catalogue Records Audio Tours Directions to Library Group Study Room Reservations Scavenger Hunts Subject Guides Staff directory information Stack signage
  • QR codes in the Library Catalogue
    • Ryerson University Library Catalogue
  • Using QR codes for downloadable audio tours
    • Ryerson University Library Audio Tour Online
  • Library QR code in Google Maps
    • Boise State University Library QR code in Google Maps
  • Group Study Room reservations
    • Brigham Young University's Harold B. Lee Library uses QR codes for its library audio tour and for Group Study Room on-the-spot reservations ( http://lib.byu.edu/sites/qrcodes /).
    • Each Group Study Room has a QR code by its number plate.  By taking a photo of these codes with a QR code reader you will be directed to a page to reserve that or another Group Study Room in the library.
  • Staff Directory pages and Research Guides
    • The San Diego State University Library is using QR Codes in its library catalog , on staff directory pages and on research guides .
    • Half Hollow Hills Community Library uses datamatrix codes on end stacks to lead patrons to subject guides on the web.
    • Lafayette College Library used QR codes for their 2010 Open House event geared to first year students, "Where in the Library is Carmen Sandiego: An Interactive Mystery Game" . Students had to collect QR coded-clues from librarians stationed throughout the library.
  • Just for fun : QR Chocolates
    • Chocolate QR Codes
    • There is no need to write vital details down. A simple scan will steer to or capture exactly what you want reader to see.
    • Reduce paper work .
    • Points to content optimized for smartphones (audio, phone#)
    • Peak an interest in technology.
    • Access to networks and hardware-potential cost to students
    • Not for those timid with technology use-know your students’ skill levels
    • Size and density of the codes
    • Overuse
    Pros & Cons Pros Cons/Potential Issues
  • QR code best practices
    • QR codes should link to an action-oriented activity, such as a survey, mailing list signup, or Facebook like, not simply a website
    • Place QR codes where they are easily visible
    • Optimize your website or any landing page your QR code links to for mobile devices
    • Consider late-adopters; try to also include an SMS component in your project
  • QR Code best practices
    • Test, test, test! Try Android, iPhone, Blackberry, Windows, and different browsers, as well as multiple brands of scanners.
    • Less dots=more readable. Shorten long URLs to give your QR code better resolution.
    • Put instructions on scanning adjacent to the code itself.
    • Track analytics and measure results to see what works for your audience.
    • Continued
  • Additional Resources
    • Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki – QR Codes
    • HOW TO: Make Your QR Codes More Beautiful
    • Education QR Codes
    • 2d code: QR code and two dimensional bar codes, news, views, and analysis
    • QR Code Best Practices for Gov 2.0
    • Articles & Presentations:
    • Ashford, R. (2010) QR codes and academic libraries CR&L News, 71 (10): 526-530.
    • Walsh, A. (2009) Quick response codes and libraries. Library Hi Tech News, 26 (5/6) 7-9.
    • Whitchurch, M. (2011) QR Codes and the Library: The Library Audio Tour. ACRL 2011 (Philadelphia, PA). 363-368.
  • Questions & Answers
  •