Module in Geog 412:Geography and NAtural Resources of the Phils

  • 383 views
Uploaded on

This is an approved module submitted to the Committee on Instructional Materials of ASSCAT,Bunawan, Agusan del Sur

This is an approved module submitted to the Committee on Instructional Materials of ASSCAT,Bunawan, Agusan del Sur

More in: Education , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
383
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 1 Lesson 1: The Five Themes of Geography Duration: 6 hours Learning Objectives: After completing this lesson, you should be able to accomplish the following: 1. define location, place, interaction, movement, and regions, 2. differentiate location from interaction, 3. compare and contrast two types or techniques in location, 4. identify different physical and human characteristics of places in the world, 5. investigate the relationship between places, 6. use a map scale to determine the distance between two places, 7. identify the relationship between people and the environment, Reference: Baerwald, T.J. and Fraser, C.(1995). “The Five Themes of Geography”.World Geography, A Global Perspective. Prentice Hall,Inc. A Division of Simon and Schuster.Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 07632 pp. 1–15 1. Location 2. Place 3. Interaction 4. Movement 5. Regions Let us read and comprehend on the definition of each theme of geography. Are you excited? Good! 5 Themes of Geography
  • 2. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 2 Definition: The “address” of a place, either absolute or relative. Example: This scientist is conducting research in Antarctica, the continent located at the South Pole. Location can be expressed in two ways, absolute and relative. Knowing the absolute location of places is like knowing the alphabet before you begin to read. If students know that Brazil is located astride the Equator, they can then investigate how that location affect Brazil’s climate. Knowing a place’s relative location provides information about its independence with other counties. Singapore’s relative location makes it a trading hub, for example. The theme of location is use when a country’s location is critical to understanding its character. Definition: The physical and human characteristics of a place that make it unique. Example: Sydney Opera House is a unique human characteristic of Sydney, Australia. Each place differs from the next in its physical and human characteristics. Asking students to describe the characteristics that make a place unique requires them to consider landforms, water bodies, climate, soils, and natural vegetation. They must also consider such human characteristics as the population, settlement patterns, culture, political systems, architecture, economic activities, and transportation and communication networks. Physical and human characteristics form “geographic signatures” that make a place unique. Such signatures pave the way to greater understanding of a place.
  • 3. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 3 Definition: How people and the environment affect each other. Example: The people of the Philippines raise rice on level terraces carved into mountains. Interaction focuses on the relationship between people and the environment. All places on earth have advantages and disadvantages for human settlement and survival. The more advantageous places usually have higher population densities than less advantageous places, such as deserts. In response to environmental shortcomings, human populations have learned to modify their environment. Interaction examines how people have changed the environment, and the consequences of those changes. Interaction is particularly useful when studying a country such as the Netherlands, which has dramatically added to its own space by building polders. Definition: How, people, goods, and ideas move from place to place. Example: Millions of people use the Los Angeles highway system for transportation. Using the theme of movement helps student investigate the relationships between places. What happens in one place affects another. With technological improvements in transportation and communication, places are fast becoming connected in an expanding network of global interdependence. Studying how people, goods, information, and ideas travel shows how places change over time. The theme of movement is use when analyzing how technological advances have changed a country’s relationship to the rest of the world.
  • 4. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 4 Definition: The human and physical traits that distinguish one area from another. Example: Zimbabwe is a tropical region with a climate suitable for producing tea. Particular regions are areas with human and/or physical traits that distinguish them from other areas. The theme of regions provides a context from making comparisons. For example, it is much easier to understand China if you consider its drier, less populated western regions separately from its wetter, more populated eastern regions that if you simply study a variety of places in China. We often use the theme of regions when a country is very large or diverse. Did you know that Philippines particularly Mindanao is divided into six regions? 
  • 5. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 5 Activity 1. Choose a place of your preference particularly in your locality. Have a picture of that place and explain the relationship of man as to: the location, place, interaction, movement, and region. Paste the picture in the box below. (Paste the picture here) _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ Did you enjoy your reading? Good! Now, let us check your understanding on the subject.
  • 6. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 6 Activity 2. Below is the Economic Map of Bunawan, Agusan del Sur. Look for the major product of each barangay. Then, explain why people of that barangay choose to grow such product. Write your answer on the box below. *Reference: Ajeto, JE.(2011).Bunawan economic maps.Welcome to Bunawan Agusan del Sur Philippines: The Gateway to Agusan Marsh. Available @ http://www.geocities.ws/buhaypinoy/Maps.html __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________
  • 7. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 7 Lesson 2: Basic Geography Skills Duration: 6 hours Learning Objectives: After completing this lesson, you should be able to accomplish the following: 1. define longitude, latitude, Equator, and Prime Meridian, 2. use latitude and longitude to locate a place's absolute location, 3. compare and contrast four types of map projections, 4. identify a map key and use it to locate features on a map, 5. use cardinal directions, 6. use a map scale to determine the distance between two cities, 7. distinguish between a political and a physical map, 8. identify different types of graphs to select which is appropriate for different situations. Figure 1.1. Western Hemisphere (left) and Eastern Hemisphere (right). © iStockphoto/Anton Seleznev. Are you ready to explore and enjoy our next lesson? Very good! This time you are about to develop your map skills. First, let us find out how geographers study our physical world. a. Globes and Map Projections a.1 Hemispheres
  • 8. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 8 The word hemisphere means "half sphere." Geographers make up imaginary lines to divide the Earth into halves. One line is the Equator, which circles the middle of the Earth. Everything north of the Equator is in the Northern Hemisphere, and everything south of the Equator is in the Southern Hemisphere. Another imaginary line that geographers use is called the Prime Meridian, which divides the world into the Eastern and Western Hemispheres. Which hemisphere do you live in? Later in this course, knowing how to divide the Earth into Eastern and Western Hemispheres will help you understand more about the region of the world that you are studying. For example, it is interesting to note that the Far East (China and other Asian nations) derives its name from its location within the Eastern Hemisphere. Lines of latitude are designated as parallels. A helpful aid is to remember that these lines are parallel to the Equator. In other words, each forms a line that is an equal distance from the Equator at all points. Students also have come up with another way to remember which are the lines of latitude: think, "lat. is fat." This refers to lines of latitude as being "wide" around a globe. Latitude is always expressed as a number of degrees between 0 and 90, either north or south of the Equator. In Chapter 1 of the textbook, you will learn about how the position of Earth in relationship to the sun determines the seasons and climate we experience. Two important parallels, the Tropic of Cancer at 23½° N and the Tropic of Capricorn at 23 ½° S, help us measure the Earth's position. You can also find the Arctic Circle at 66½° N latitude and the Antarctic Circle at 66 ½° S latitude. Meridians are the formal names for the lines of longitude, which I always picture on a globe as being "long"itude. How the lines of longitude are drawn on a flat map gives you a hint as to what type of projection you are seeing. If you look at the four map projections on page 7 of the textbook, you will notice that each projection uses a different way to draw the lines of longitude. No matter how they are drawn, the lines of longitude are always expressed as a number of degrees between 0 and 180, either east or west of the Prime Meridian. The Prime Meridian is located at 0 degrees; on the opposite side of the Earth, at 180 degrees, is the International Date Line. The Prime Meridian (0 degrees) is not a natural designation like the Equator (as all meridians dissect the world in half). a.2 Lines of Latitude and Longitude
  • 9. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 9 Rather, geographers decided that it would it run specifically through Greenwich in Great Britain. What do you think would happen if the Prime Meridian was located somewhere else in the world? Geographers wanted to be able to give a more precise location for any place on a globe or map than could be shown with just lines of latitude and longitude. Consequently, they decided that there would be 60 minutes (60') between each degree of latitude and longitude. Many maps may not show the minutes; but you can estimate an answer—half way between two degrees of longitude is 30 minutes. While road atlases will not show the lines of latitude and longitude, most other atlases will show them. With minutes of latitude and longitude, an absolute location can be very precise. You may see an absolute location given as 31°15' S, 12°25' W. There is a lot of information available in this notation. We know from the S and the W that the place is in the Southern and Western Hemisphere. Imagine we have a map of the world that has only the lines shown in the figure below. From this, we would know that our location was in the lower left section. In any notation of absolute location, the standard format is to list the line of latitude first, then the line of longitude. So, we would look just below the 30°S line of latitude and just to the left of the 12°W line of longitude to find our location. Use your fingers or two pencil points to line these up, if this helps you keep track.
  • 10. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 10 Directions: Use your world map to answer the questions in the FLASH activity box. Type your answer(s) into the white text box. 1. In what three hemispheres are African countries located? 2. Which country is located at 50˚S, 70˚W? 3. Which country is located at 23 ½ ˚S, 50˚ W? 4. Which country is located at 0˚, 80˚ W? 5. Which country is located at 15˚N, 123 ˚E? APPLYING MAP SKILLS
  • 11. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 11 The Earth is a sphere, so a globe is the most accurate way to represent it. But it is not convenient to carry a globe when traveling, so people developed maps. How you represent the Earth's round surface on a flat map is called a projection. The text asks you to imagine taking the whole peel from an orange and trying to flatten it on the table. Think about how a movie is projected onto a flat screen. While the movie may look similar to real life, there is an obvious difference. Follow the directions for the following map activity to help you see how this works. Materials needed: balloon, thread, globe, fine-point permanent marker, and coloring material Procedure: 1) Inflate the balloon to its precise volume. Tie its tail with the thread making sure the air can’t escape. 2) Before drawing any lines to the inflated balloon, use the Azimuthal and any of the other three map projections to guide you in creating a global balloon. 3) Using a marker, draw first the equator and the Prime Meridian as precisely as you can at their respective positions. Then, carefully draw the lines of longitude from the North Pole to the South Pole of the balloon. Write the degree of each line. 4) After successfully draw the lines of longitude and latitude, you shall now start drawing the seven continents at their precise location. To better help you, start drawing at the Prime Meridian and at the equator. 5) You may add color to your global balloon making it more attractive and appealing. CRITERIA Points (5 points) Content (5 points) Accuracy (5 points) Reliability (5 points) Neatness (20 points) Total Score a.3 From Globes to Maps ACTIVITY: MAP PROJECTION
  • 12. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 12 A great circle is any circle that you can draw on the Earth that divides it into two equal parts. It is also the shortest distance between two points on Earth. Airlines and ship captains use great circles to plan their quickest routes. A flat map may not show that the great circle is the shortest route, but if you use a globe, it will be more obvious. Follow the directions for the following great circle activity to help you see how great circle routes are shorter. Your text describes the most commonly used projections: Goode's Interrupted Equal-Area projection, the Robinson projection, the Winkel Tripel projection, and the Mercator projection. Each of these map projections has its own strengths and weaknesses. While the size and shape of the continents are fairly accurate on the Goode's Interrupted Equal-Area projection, the distances (especially the oceans) are far less accurate. While the Robinson projection shows accurate size and shape of oceans and continents, the North and South Poles appear quite distorted. Similarly, the Winkel Tripel projection accurately represents the continents' shapes and sizes and, compared with the Robinson projection, has far less distortion of the North and South Poles. For over 400 years, sailors have used the Mercator projection map. It shows the true directions (north, south, east, and west), and the parallels and meridians are straight and intersect at right angles, making it easier to plot a course on the map and follow it while at sea. Compare the size and shape of the land masses on each of the projection maps on page 7. Also, compare those sizes and shapes with those on a globe. Look especially at Alaska, Antarctica, and Greenland. a.4 Great Circles a.5 Common Map Projections
  • 13. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 13 Figure 1.3. A compass rose is used for cardinal directions.© iStockphoto/Germán Ariel Berra. You need to be aware that a map key is sometimes labeled "legend" on maps, but a key and a legend are the same thing. It is very helpful when you are making a map to give the map key a title. The map of Sri Lanka on page 9 of the textbook, for example, has its key labeled "Elevations." Titles make it easier for readers to determine what type of map they are looking at. On all of the maps you have seen so far in the textbook, the compass rose always has north on top. While this design is quite common, you will find maps (particularly older maps and maps with hand-drawn directions) that have a different cardinal direction shown at the top of the compass rose. When making a map, you should always include a compass rose. An arrow pointing up with an "N" above it is sufficient if you are doing a quick sketch. a.6 Parts of Maps
  • 14. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 14 Use the cardinal directions and the map of the world, Asia, and Philippines to answer the following questions. 1. How does the map indicate a national boundary? 2. Which direction is Colombia from Brazil? 3. Which direction is Taiwan from China? 4. Which direction are the Bislig City from Bunawan? 5. True or false: A legend and a map key are the same thing. 6. East of Luzon Sea, SW of Pampanga, and SE of Zambales? 7. NE of Pangasinan, W of Nueva Vizcaya? 8. E of Rizal and Laguna, W of Lamon Bay? 9. N of Leyte, SW of Samar Sea? 10. E of Moro Gulf, W of North Cotabato, and N of Sultan Kudarat? Write your answer below, as honestly as you can.  1._________________________ 2._________________________ 3._________________________ 4._________________________ 5._________________________ 6._________________________ 7._________________________ 8._________________________ 9._________________________ 10._________________________ A.6.1_Reading Check
  • 15. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 15 Every map includes a scale bar, or a measuring line, that helps you figure the distance between places on a map. The concept of scale is something some students often find difficult to understand. Think of a model car; it is made to scale. Have you ever seen one of those fancy toy train set-ups with the little people and the miniature trees? They also are made to scale. We know that the real thing is much larger. The very small map of the huge country of Spain on page 9 of the textbook has a scale of 1 inch for every 100 miles. In comparison, a map of a classroom might have a scale of one centimeter for every few feet. Paying careful attention to the scale will give you a sense of the real size of the place you are looking at on a map. Let me give you an example of how misconceptions about scale can cause problems. For a vacation one year, my family and I drove to New Hampshire from Missouri. One part of our trip was to drive across the state of New York, which we did on Christmas Day. I did not realize that the scales for each state were different in the road atlas I was using. I was sure we could drive across New York in five or six hours and be in New Hampshire to celebrate the evening of Christmas with my aunt. Wow, was I wrong! It took us nine hours, and we were only able to find one gas station open on Christmas. We didn't get to my aunt's house until 2:30 in the morning. Moral of the story: always check your road atlas carefully for true distance on the scale! (Villasana, J., 2007) How are you at knowing what direction you are actually facing? If this is not easy for you, do not worry. It is an important skill and one that you can learn. It makes following map directions (during trips, etc.) easier. Using a compass can help you become comfortable learning the cardinal directions.
  • 16. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 16 Step 1. Open your Encarta Premium 2009 software, type in the search bar the place or the map of the place (e.g. Davao, Philippines map), and then click on one of the Best Matches with a globe icon. Step 2. After clicking on the Davao, Philippines map you can now see the entire map of Davao and by using hand tools (cursor) you may go up and reach other places in the Philippine map. Simple.  Other easiest way to measure the distance of places is simply using the Microsoft Encarta Premium 2009. Just type the place’ map and learn its tools. 
  • 17. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 17 Step 3. Map tools are now ready. Hand tool for grabbing the map, simply moving the map to the north, south, west, and east. Zoom tools, which change the view of an image so as to magnify or shrink it. Click on the ruler and a Measure Tool box will appear on the map. Step 4. Now that you already knew the purpose and functions of each map tool, learn to develop your map skills by simply measuring the distance of two places. Have fun and enjoy this activity prepared only for your learning. 
  • 18. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 18 Use the map of Davao, Philippines on Microsoft Encarta Premium 2009 to answer the following questions. Just move the cursor to find other place in the map. Write your answer on the line. (5 points each) 1. How many miles is it from Davao City to Tagum City? 2. How many miles is it from Bunawan to Libertad, Agusan del Sur? 3. How many miles is it from Digos City to Kidapawan City? 4. How many miles is it from General Santos City to Koronadal City? 5. How many miles is it from Bunawan, Agusan Del Sur to Butuan City? Answers: 1.)________________________ 2.)________________________ 3.)________________________ 4.)________________________ 5.)________________________ A special purpose map provides very limited information. A population map, for example, will show where and how many people live in a particular state, country, or continent. However, to understand why the population lives where it does, you may need to consult additional sources, such as maps that indicate where certain crops are raised or where natural resources are located and possibly a map that shows the region's climate. A6.2_Reading Check a.7 Special Purpose Maps
  • 19. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 19 Please make note of the purposes of the different types of graphs listed in the following table. Table 1.1 Types of Graphs Graph Type Purpose Bar graph compares quantities Line graph plots changes over a period of time Circle graph shows how the whole of something is divided into parts Pictograph compares quantities using pictures or symbols Climograph provides an overall picture of climate by combining the line and bar graph Some types of graphs are easier to read than others. For example, I have a hard time telling what the incomplete cars represent in the pictograph on page 12 of the textbook. Therefore, I prefer bar graphs, which are often more precise. We also could improve the climograph on page 13 by adding a key. We could, for example, indicate that the line graph is for temperature by drawing a red line and labeling it "temperature." At the bottom of most graphs is something called a source line, which tells you where the information came from. As a critical reader, you will want to make sure that the source of the information is not biased (has a particular slant on the information to make it appear the way the authors would like). The textbook authors remind us that textbooks use the most unbiased sources possible, but we must remember that our textbook is from one organization, the National Geographic Society, which may have a particular attitude about some types of information. Using Graphs, Charts, and Diagrams
  • 20. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 20 Table 1.2 Example of Graphs Data Graph number of students in a class and number of girls and boys circle graph number of students who attend class each day per month line graph comparison of the heights of students bar graph number of books read by a student during a summer pictograph weather patterns of a country for a year climograph Complete the sentences by selecting the correct term from the word bank and dragging it to the appropriate blank. Decide whether a bar graph, a line graph, a circle graph, or a pictograph would best show the following information. Study Exercises Exercise 1
  • 21. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 21 ADDITIONAL ACTIVITIES You can practice the concepts and skills you learned in Lesson 1 with these activities. Choose two or three activities to complete and share them with your parents or instructor. These are not submitted for grading. 1. Planning a trip. Pretend you are planning a trip. Find a map that shows both the beginning and ending points of the trip. Write down the directions of how to travel from one point to the other. For example, use a highway map to plan a vacation leaving from Chicago, Illinois, and traveling to Mobile, Alabama. (Begin in Chicago. Take I-55 south to Jackson, Mississippi. In Jackson, take U.S. Highway 49 south to the Gulf Coast, where you can take I-10 to Mobile.) Travel. Using a bus ticket, try to find out the distance from your departure point (e.g. from home) to your destination point. Write all the places that you crossed during the trip as well as their landmarks (e.g. a falls, volcano, a mall, and etc.) 2. Guess My Location. Give the absolute location for 10 cities around the world. Be sure to include the directions north, south, east, and west when giving the degrees of latitude and longitude. 3. Destinations. Using a globe, find the distance between the following cities: (a) Tokyo, Japan, and Los Angeles, California; (b) Cape Town, South Africa, and Buenos Aires, Argentina; and (c) Paris, France, and Montreal, Canada. First, find the distance if you traveled east or west and then find the distance if you were to take a great circle route. You can use a wire or other flexible material to measure the distance. If a plane travels at 500 mph, find out which way would be quicker and by how much time. 4. Specialty Maps and Charting. Using a specialty map (e.g., population density), compare the features of different areas. Create a chart using the information from the map. For example, in looking at a map with population density, chart the population density of five or more cities using a bar or pictograph.
  • 22. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 22 5. Charting. Keep a record over one or two weeks. You might record how far you walked the dog each day, the number of fruits or vegetables you ate each day, how much time you spent on the computer or watching television, or how much time you spent doing household chores. Decide which type of chart or graph would best represent your data and make it. 6. Flow Charts. Creating a flow chart can be a lot of fun. Many events or activities can be charted in this way. Make a chart showing how to play a winning baseball game or to represent how you spend your day or a week. A flow chart could also show the consequences of different decisions you might make. For example, if I oversleep, then my dog may jump on my bed and lick my face or my dad might come in and turn on my light, but if I were to wake up with my alarm, then I could take a long bath or have time to read my book. 7. Map Collections. Collect various types of maps and compare them. Write a paragraph for a few of the maps. Summarize what you can learn from reading them. 8. Map Making. Create a map of your home or your neighborhood. Remember to include the title, a key, a compass rose, and a source line. Mapmakers use symbols to represent different features, which are then coded in the map key. For your house, some of the things you might code could include the tables, chairs, windows, doors, and others. For a neighborhood map, include streets, driveways, houses, stores, special landmarks, parks, and others. Use a large sheet of paper so that you have plenty of space. After completing your map, write and tell someone directions from one point on your map to another. Did they get to the right place? If not, work together to figure out why. *Villasana, J.( 2007). Basic Geography Skills
  • 23. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 23 Lesson 3: Geography in the Elementary School Duration: 6 hours Learning Objectives: After completing this lesson, you should be able to accomplish the following: 1. identify reasons of including geography in the school curriculum , 2. criticize the geography and human development in the Philippines, 3. describe the human and physical geography of the Philippines, 4. identify techniques in teaching geography in the elementary schools, and 5. identify ways of improving geographic education in the elementary grades. a.) The Importance of Geography in the Scool Curriculum.(n.d.) Canadian Council for Geographic Education.Queen’s University, Kingston Ontario, K7L 3N6. Retrieved from: http://www.cgeducation.ca/programs/geoliteracy/docs/importance_in_curriculum.pdf b.) Geography and Human Development in the Philippines.( 29 July 2013).Highlights of the theme chapter of the 7th Philippine Human Development Report.Philippine Human Development Report. Retrieved June 27, 2014 from http://www.nscb.gov.ph/hdi/2012/Geography%20and%20Human%20Development%2 0in%20the%20Philippines.pdf c.) Haas, ME.(1989). Teaching Geography in the Elementary School. ERIC Digest.ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education Bloomington IN. Available @ http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-9212/geography.htm Let us read and criticize on the inclusion of Geography into the school curriculum. Are you excited? Good! Read the following articles by following their links (URL). You may download them directly by clicking the links.
  • 24. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 24 Activity 1. Interview four respondents (student, teacher, parent, local official) in your community. Let them answer the question in the box below. Respondents Why include geography into our school curriculum? 1. 2. 3. 4. After reading the articles, take a break, reflect on the articles, and answer the following activities honestly:
  • 25. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 25 Lesson 4: Writing Integrative Lessons in Geography Duration: 6 hours Learning Objectives: After completing this lesson, you should be able to accomplish the following: 1. explore different strategies in teaching geography, 2. criticize and implement an appropriate strategy in teaching geography, 3. compare and contrast existing lesson plans in geography, and 3. plan and create a lesson, integrating map skills, in teaching geography. Read the following lesson plans in teaching geography by following the link (URL) below. You may download them directly by clicking the links. a) Watson, Kristi.(1999). Geography, level: Elementary. New Hartford Elementary School, New Hartford, Iowa, USA. Available @ http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/1151.html Let us read, comprehend, and criticize some lesson plans in teaching geography. Are you excited? Good! Materials Required: CD ROM computer,LCD projector,Neighborhood Map Machine computer program by Tom Snyder Productions Activity Time: 3 Lessons, 7 - 10 days Concepts Taught: Map Skills: Definition of a Map, Map Symbols, and Compass Rose After reading the sample lesson plans, choose one (1) as a guide in creating your own instruction for your final demonstration. We shall criticize, examine, and modify some of its content if needed.
  • 26. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 26 Lesson 1: How Does a Map Show Our World? Map Skills - Third Grade Kristi Watson - New Hartford Elementary June 28, 1999 Objectives: *Understand that a map shows how a place looks from above. *Explain how to use a map key. Overview: Students learn that a map is a drawing that shows what a place looks like from above. They use a map key and symbols to create a map of the school and its neighborhood. Resources Needed: *Communities Around Us, Silver Burdett Ginn, 1997 Time: 1 -2 periods Classroom Structure: Large group instruction followed by small group activity. Materials: Paper, Colored pencils or crayons, Text (Silver Burdett Ginn, Communities Around Us: Grade 3) Introduction: 1. Discuss what is a bird’s-eye view. 2. Ask each student to collect 5 small objects in the classroom and place them on the floor. Have them look down on the objects and draw pictures of how they look from straight overhead. 3. Share and discuss. Lesson: 1. Read pages M2 - M3 from text together. Discuss. Activity: (Groups will complete this activity while waiting to use the computer in the Lesson 2 activity.) Students will work in groups of 2 - 3 to create a map of the school and its neighborhood. 1. Give each group a piece of paper. 2. Tell the students to imagine that they are flying over our school and its neighborhood. If they took a photograph of what they saw below them, what would it look like? 3. Have them draw a map of the area using colored pencils or crayons that includes a map key and symbols for important features. 4. Share and compare. Comments. 5. Collect and place in conference folder. Assessment: *Teacher Observation *Student product to be placed in portfolio
  • 27. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 27 Lesson 2: Map Symbols Map Skills - Third Grade Kristi Watson - New Hartford Elementary June 28, 1999 Objectives: *Explain what is a map symbol. *Use a map key to read a map. Overview: Students learn to recognize common map symbols. They work in small groups to plan a map of a community. They create and write about this community using the Neighborhood Map Machine software. Students will also create 3D maps of their plans. Resources Needed: *Communities Around Us , Silver Burdett Ginn, 1997 *Neighborhood Map Machine, Tom Snyder Productions, 1997 *Computer (Sytem 7.1 or higher, 2 megabytes of available RAM, 640 x 480 color monitor) *LCD Projector Time: 4 - 6 periods Materials: *Symbols from magazines and signs. *Large Neighborhood Map Machine symbols printed from the Print Goodies menu (named Buildings #1, Building #2, Building #3) for each group. *Blank Neighborhood Map Machine map grid printed in the 4x4 or 6x6 size. One for each group. *Large floor grid for each group (4x4 or 6x6 size). *Neighborhood Map Machine 3D cutouts. *Text (Silver Burdett Ginn: Communities Around Us, Grade 3) Introduction: 1. Review lesson: How Does a Map Show Our World (M2). Review: How are symbols like the real objects? How are they different? Why do we use symbols? 2. Collect a variety of symbols from magazines, signs, etc. Post copies of the symbols on the board/bulletin board. Ask students to cut pictures from magazines and post these next to the appropriate symbols. Discuss. Lesson: 1. Read page M7 together. Discuss. 2. Introduce the program Neighborhood Map Machine - Create a Map using a LCD projector if possible. Activity: Students will work in the small groups from Lesson 1 to plan and create a map of a community.
  • 28. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 28 1. Brainstorm (as a large group) what “places” you would find in a community. List these on chart paper. (Tie this in to use of symbols to represent these places.) 2. In small groups, students need to write a plan for their community that includes at least ten symbols and why they chose them. (Examples: buildings, roads, parks, parking lots, trees, and other small objects) 3. Groups will take their plan and recreate it using the computer program Neighborhood Map Machine. They will also enter in the Notebook a brief description of their community. Make sure groups save their maps for future use. (Saved maps can then be used in the Mystery Mode of the program and Slideshow.) Groups waiting to use the computer to create their map can work on the Bird’s-Eye View Map Activity from Lesson 1. 4. Each group needs to print a copy of the map and description for each group member and the teacher. Enrichment Activity: Students will create a 3D version of the map they created in Activity A. 1. Students print 3D models of their buildings and objects from their map (Print Goodies menu) and reproduce them on a heavy stock paper. Have the students then cut, fold, and paste to create their 3D objects. 2. Each group will recreate the roads, parks, lakes... on the large grid paper using the grids from their map as a guide. 3. Add buildings and other 3D objects to the grid. 4. Display Assessments: *Teacher observation *Student projects *Rubric Lesson 3 - Compass Rose Map Skills - Third Grade Kristi Watson - New Hartford Elementary June 28, 1999 Objectives: *Recognize the four main directions of north, south, east, and west, and the intermediate directions of northeast, northwest, southeast, and southwest. *Use a compass rose to find directions on a map. Overview: Students identify compass directions in the classroom and on a map. They will use a compass rose to identify directions on a map, determine a route, give directions, and solve a mystery based on direction.
  • 29. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 29 Resources Needed: *Communities Around Us, Silver Burdett Ginn, 1997 *Neighborhood Map Machine, Tom Snyder Productions, 1997 *Computer (System 7.1 or higher, 2 megabytes of available RAM, 640 x 480 color monitor) *LCD Projector Time: 3 -4 periods Materials: *Copies for each student of compass rose ( found on page 90 of Neighborhood Map Machine guide book). Laminate if possible. *Copies for each student of Directions-Mystery Map with text added by teacher. *Copies for each group of Directions Extensions Map with text added by teacher. *Text (Silver Burdett Ginn: Communities Around Us, Grade 3) *Index cards for text activity Introduction: 1. Introduce four main directions using activities in text. Lesson: 1. Read pages M10 - M11 from text together. Discuss. 2. Hand out laminated copies of compass rose. 3. Play Simon Says with main directions, then add intermediate directions. Activity: Students will work in their small groups from Lesson One to complete a mystery using a compass rose. 1. Introduce Neighborhood Map Machine - Directions Mystery using a LCD projector is possible. Students need the Directions-Mystery Map activity sheet. Complete this together. 2. Using the Directions-Extension Map, each group will work to find the mystery location based on directional clues given in the program. Groups waiting to use the computer will work on the “What Direction Do I Go?” game explained on page M11 of the text. 3. Students will hand in their completed activity sheets. Extension Activity: Students use a map of their own to create a mystery using directional clues. Assessments: *Teacher Observation *Student Product
  • 30. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 30 Feel FREE to write your REFLECTIONS here about this course, Geog 412. Does it benefit you?  ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________
  • 31. GL De Pedro Module in Geog 412 31 References Ajeto, JE.(2011).Bunawan economic maps. Welcome to Bunawan Agusan del Sur Philippines: The Gateway to Agusan Marsh. Available @ http://www.geocities.ws/buhaypinoy/Maps.html Baerwald, T.J. and Fraser, C.(1995) World Geography: A Global Perspective. Prentice Hall,Inc. A Division of Simon and Schuster. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 07632 Dorman, S.,Smalley, D. and Villasana, J.( 2007). Basic Geography Skills. MU High School 7th Grade Social Studies, Part One. University of Missouri. Available @ http://muhigh.missouri.edu/exec/data/courses/8227/public/lesson01/lesson01.aspx Geography and Human Development in the Philippines.( 29 July 2013).Highlights of the theme chapter of the 7th Philippine Human Development Report.Philippine Human Development Report. Retrieved June 27, 2014 from http://www.nscb.gov.ph/hdi/2012/Geography%20and%20Human%20Development%2 0in%20the%20Philippines.pdf Haas, Mary E.(1989). Teaching Geography in the Elementary School. ERIC Digest.ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education Bloomington IN. Available @ http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-9212/geography.htm Mindanao Regions.(2010).Mindanaomaps.com.Available @ maps@mindanaomaps.com The Importance of Geography in the Scool Curriculum.(n.d.) Canadian Council for Geographic Education.Queen’s University, Kingston Ontario, K7L 3N6. Retrieved from: http://www.cgeducation.ca/programs/geoliteracy/docs/importance_in_curriculum.pdf Watson, Kristi.(1999). Geography, level: Elementary. New Hartford Elementary School, New Hartford, Iowa, USA. Available @ http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/1151.html