Bubble sort
Bubble sort has worst-case and average complexity both О(n2
), where n is the number of items
being sorted.
Th...
Selection sort
 It has O(n2) time complexity.
 Generally performs worse than the similar insertion sort.
 Selection sor...
Complexity
Worst case :
T(n) = O(n²)
Avg Case :
T(n) = O(n log n).
Solving the recurrence gives C(n) = 1.39n log₂ n.
This ...
Merge sort
Worst case performance O(n log n)
Best case performance O(n log n) typical,
O(n) natural variant
Average case p...
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Algo report Sorting Techniques

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Algo report Sorting Techniques

  1. 1. Bubble sort Bubble sort has worst-case and average complexity both О(n2 ), where n is the number of items being sorted. The only significant advantage that bubble sort has over most other implementations, even quicksort, but not insertion sort, is that the ability to detect that the list is sorted is efficiently built into the algorithm. When the list is already sorted (best-case), the complexity of bubble sort is only O(n). Data structure Array Worst case performance Best case performance Average case performance Worst case space complexity auxiliary Insertion sort  Efficient for (quite) small data sets  Adaptive (i.e., efficient) for data sets that are already substantially sorted: the time complexity is O(n + d), where d is the number of inversions  More efficient in practice than most other simple quadratic (i.e., O(n2)) algorithms such as selection sort or bubble sort; the best case (nearly sorted input) is O(n)  Stable; i.e., does not change the relative order of elements with equal keys  In-place; i.e., only requires a constant amount O(1) of additional memory space  The best case input is an array that is already sorted. In this case insertion sort has a linear running time (i.e., Θ(n)).  The average case and the worst case is quadratic (i.e., O(n2 )). Class Sorting algorithm Data structure Array Worst case performance О(n2 ) comparisons, swaps Best case performance O(n) comparisons, O(1) swaps Average case performance О(n2 ) comparisons, swaps Worst case space complexity О(n) total, O(1) auxiliary
  2. 2. Selection sort  It has O(n2) time complexity.  Generally performs worse than the similar insertion sort.  Selection sort is noted for its simplicity, and it has performance advantages over more complicated algorithms in certain situations, particularly where auxiliary memory is limited.  Selection sort is preferable to insertion sort in terms of number of writes (Θ(n) swaps versus Ο(n2 ) swaps). (This can be important if writes are significantly more expensive than reads, such as withEEPROM or Flash memory, where every write lessens the lifespan of the memory.) Quicksort Worst case performance O(n2 ) Best case performance O(n log n) (simple partition) or O(n) (three-way partition and equal keys) Average case performance O(n log n) Worst case space complexity O(n) auxiliary (naive) O(log n) auxiliary (Sedgewick 1978)  O(n log n) comparisons to sort n items.  In the worst case, it makes O(n2) comparisons.  Quicksort is often faster in practice than other O(n log n) algorithms. Additionally, quicksort's sequential and localized memory references work well with a cache.  Is not a stable sort.  O(log n) additional space used by the stack during the recursion Choice of pivot  The leftmost element of the partition would often be chosen as the pivot element. Unfortunately, this causes worst-case behavior on already sorted arrays.  The problem was easily solved by choosing either a random index for the pivot, choosing the middle index of the partition or (especially for longer partitions) choosing the median of the first, middle and last element of the partition for the pivot (as recommended by Sedgewick).
  3. 3. Complexity Worst case : T(n) = O(n²) Avg Case : T(n) = O(n log n). Solving the recurrence gives C(n) = 1.39n log₂ n. This means that, on average, quicksort performs only about 39% worse than in its best case. In this sense it is closer to the best case than the worst case. Heapsort Worst case performance Best case performance [1] Average case performance Worst case space complexity auxiliary  Although somewhat slower in practice on most machines than a well-implemented quicksort, it has the advantage of a more favorable worst-case O(n log n) runtime. Heapsort is an in- place algorithm, but it is not a stable sort.  Because of the O(n log n) upper bound on heapsort's running time and constant upper bound on its auxiliary storage, embedded systems with real-time constraints or systems concerned with security often use heapsort.  Heapsort requires only a constant amount of memory.
  4. 4. Merge sort Worst case performance O(n log n) Best case performance O(n log n) typical, O(n) natural variant Average case performance O(n log n) Worst case space complexity O(n) auxiliary  Most implementations produce a stable sort.  If the running time of merge sort for a list of length n is T(n), then the recurrence T(n) = 2T(n/2) + n.  For large n and a randomly ordered input list, merge sort's expected (average) number of comparisons approaches α·n fewer than the worst case where  In the worst case, merge sort does about 39% fewer comparisons than quicksort does in the average case.  In terms of moves, merge sort's worst case complexity is O(n log n)—the same complexity as quicksort's best case, and merge sort's best case takes about half as many iterations as the worst case.  Merge sort is a stable sort and is more efficient at handling slow-to-access sequential media.  Merge sort is often the best choice for sorting a linked list. The slow random-access performance of a linked list makes some other algorithms (such as quicksort) perform poorly, and others (such as heapsort) completely impossible. 

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