Budgeting and Funding - Lecture for Preservation & Presentation of the Moving Image Master (2012)
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Budgeting and Funding - Lecture for Preservation & Presentation of the Moving Image Master (2012)

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Some thoughts about budgeting, funding, the cost structure of an audiovisual archive & new business models

Some thoughts about budgeting, funding, the cost structure of an audiovisual archive & new business models

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Budgeting and Funding - Lecture for Preservation & Presentation of the Moving Image Master (2012) Budgeting and Funding - Lecture for Preservation & Presentation of the Moving Image Master (2012) Presentation Transcript

  • BUDGETING & FUNDING Lecture Preservation & Presentation of the Moving ImageGeert Wissink. 15 oktober 2012 1
  • 22
  • PUBLIC VALUE 30
  • PUBLIC VALUE (ACCORDING TO BBC)• Democratic value - to support active and informed citizenship byproviding trusted, impartial, in-depth news and information that help peoplemake sense of the world• Cultural and creative value - to enrich the cultural life of the nation byenabling the UK’s best creative talents to produce great original work andprovide a broad range of memorable and enjoyable programmes andevents• Educational value - contribute to education for all by creating a widerange of accessible programmes and services that feed curiosity andenable people to learn throughout their lives• Social and community value - help make the UK a more inclusivesociety by providing programmes and services that connect communities,encourage participation and help build a sense of place and belonging• Global value - support the UK’s global role by being the world’s mosttrusted provider of international news and by showcasing the best of Britishculture to a global audience 4 4Source: Annual Report on Preservation Issues for European Audiovisual Collections – Presto Space Deliverable D-22.8(2007)
  • PUBLIC VALUETo have public value, collections should be1) online; this requires digitisation, encoding and hosting2) public – because any restriction on access is aproportionate restriction of interest, visitors to the site – andultimately any value, public or commercial, associated withthe site3) visible – the hardest condition of all.Cory Doctorrow: “my problem isn’t piracy, it’s obscurity” 5 5
  • SUSTAINING PUBLIC VALUELong term thinking should be engrained in every culturalproductive processbut- Short-term commercial value is at odds with long termheritage considerations (different views on importance)One way to keep the archive relevant is to engage with the(creative) producers at a much earlier stage in thegeneration of the audiovisual material 6 6
  • REALLY LONG TERM THINKING 7 7
  • FROM ANALOGUE TO DIGITAL Text
  • FALLING COST DIGITAL STORAGESource: Kurzweil. The Singularity is Near 9 9
  • # HOURS UPLOADED TO YOUTUBE (every hour) 10
  • ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS 30
  • PHASES IN MANAGING COLLECTIONSPre-Professional Era- lay collectors, donators, amateursProfessional Era- academic professionals Text- profession defined in cognitive and scientific termsPost-Professional Era- huge increase in museums- seperations between artistic and administrative control- complex bureaucratic institutionsSource: Between the Devil of the Business Model and the Deep Blue Sea of Public Services - KaijaKaitavuori 12
  • DEPARTMENT WITHIN LARGER ORGANIZATION Text
  • INAFunding: 60 % government funded, 40 % commercial activityBusiness model:1) Broker for other archives (Tour de France, TextIOC, TF1) - throught ImediaPro (INA keepssmall handling fee per transaction, partners do fullfillment2) Distribution agreementsOther organizations store content at INA’s Archive
  • PRELINGER ARCHIVES - 60.000 FILMS 15
  • 2. ORGANIZATION SOUND AND VISION 30 16
  • PEOPLE 200 FTE 50 FTE EXTRA IMAGES FOR THE FUTURE Text
  • ORGANOGRAM SOUND AND VISION
  • MASS DIGITIZATION & PRESERVATION9 EU TENDERS in last 5 years (more than 220 K costs)Video Digibeta Film Preservation Perfo-AcetateFilmPreservation AcetateFilm Preservation NitrateFilm DigitizationSDFilm Digitization HDDigitization of PhotographicMaterials*Photo Digitisation ColorEducation Media Platform
  • PROJECT & PROGRAMMESITDigitizationAccess (portals)ExhibitionSponsorshipsDepotProductions (Documentary)SalesResearch Projects (Dutch, EU, internal)Question: what’s the annual budget of Sound and Vision? 20 20
  • INCOME 21
  • INCOME TOP 5 22
  • EXPENDITURE 23
  • CHART COSTS STRUCTURAL FINANCED ACTIVITIES 24
  • FUNDING 30
  • FUNDING CASE: IMAGES FOR THE FUTURE 30
  • 100 YEARS OF CONTENT 27
  • COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS"The total balance of costs and returns of restoring,preserving and digitizing audio-visual material (excludingcosts of tax payments) will be between: 20+ and 60+million’’ (SEO, 2006). The "plus" represents non-quantifiable indirect effects and social benefits that gobeyond the users’ benefits. 28 28
  • BUSINESS CASETotal costs: 173 million euroCost-Benefits Analysis to support claimThis analysis followed the "Research into Effects on Infrastructure" frameworkdefined by the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Ministry of Transport(Eigenraam, 2000). This framework shows how the costs and benefits ofinfrastructural investments such as roads, railways etc. can be determined. Inaddition to ‘hard’ numbers, environmental and other ‘soft’ effects are an intrinsicpart of the analysis. The socio-economic returns of these structural investmentsare calculated over a substantial period of time: in the case of Images of theFuture, this period was set at 30 years. 29 29
  • 3030
  • FROM ANALOGUE TO DIGITAL 31 31
  • FROM ANALOGUE TO DIGITAL 32 32
  • DIGITAL ARCHIVE 33
  • NEW BUSINESS MODELS 30
  • OPEN BUSINESS MODELS ONLINE1. Subscription model2. Pay per view/ download (Ximon, Netflix, Amazon)3. Free + added quality (Prelinger Archives)4. Freemium (+ service) (Flickr, Linkedin)5. Advertisement (NY Times)6. Sponsorships (Memory of the Netherlands, GoogleBooks)7. Community engagement (Tribler, Mozilla, Drupal) 35 35
  • BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS 36
  • BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS 37
  • ANALOGUE MODEL 38 38
  • DIGITAL MODEL 39 39
  • NEW REVENUE MODELS 40 40
  • The heritage institution creating the experience 41 41
  • 2. DIGITAL ORIGINALThe heritage institution as a digital heritage brokerThe heritage institution as a digital heritage broker 42
  • 3. DIGITAL CURATORThe heritage institution providing the contextThe heritage institution providing the context 43
  • 4. DIGITAL BRANDINGThe heritage institution creating the reputation and building the brandThe heritage institution creating the reputation and building the brand1. Digital Brand as quality stamp2. Support for charity3. Crowd funding 44 44
  • 5. PRODUCT BUNDLEThe heritage institution as the provider of product bundlesThe heritage institution as the provider of product bundles 45 45
  • BUSINESS MODELLING THE FUTURE 30 46
  • ASSIGNMENT1. Think of a future organizational model for the audiovisualarchive2. Use the business model canvas to write down differentaspects of the new model (capture them on PostIts)3. We’ll discuss the answers together 47 47
  • CANVAS 48 48
  • FIN!gwissink@beeldengeluid.nl twitter: @geertwissink 30
  • PHOTO CREDITS SOURCECollection Netherlands Institute for Source and Vision LICENSE Creative Commons Attribution - Share Alike 30