Australian Animals Screen
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Australian Animals Screen Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Learning Areas English: Texts and contexts (Everyday texts, School) (Outcomes 2.4, 3.4), Language Context This topic is part of the broader orientation ESL Scope and Scales Working within Scales Australian (Outcomes 2.7, 2.8, 3.7, 3.8), Strategies in the New Arrivals (Outcomes 2.11, 2.12, 3.11, 3.12) Science Program, to Australia, which aims to build socio-cultural, 2–7 Band Primary and Middle Animals Life systems (Outcome 1.5) environmental and Years Essential Learnings Identity Students reflect and communicate with others English language knowledge. Year Levels Year 4–7 New Arrivals Developing The understandings Program developing a sense of belonging to learning teams. about Australia in this program include: Evidence an Information Thinking • Oral and written Students use a wide range of thinking modes and develop metacognitive awareness. - Which animals are native to Australia? recount. • Oral and written Report - What are the Communication characteristics of information report. Students develop skills to communicate in a some Australian • Response to range of models to achieve identified outcomes. animals? reflection activities. - Which Australian Equity animals are in danger Multicultural perspective of extinction? The diversity of knowledge and experiences with animals is valued. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ perspective Australian animals to Indigenous people is acknowledged. Timeline 8-10 weeks as an integrated program. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 2. Teaching and Learning Cycle Australian Animals – Developing an Information Report ld Mo Fie del t he lin g/D g i l din • Connect to prior knowledge. ec on Bu • Develop simple concept map st of Australian animals. • Examine purpose and structure of ru • Read stories and poems about Australian information reports. ct i animals. • Deconstruct a model information report, ng • Read reports and watch videos about highlight text structure and language Australian animals and extend vocabulary. features. • Develop a description of an Australian • Activities to reinforce structure of a report. animal. • Language based activities. • Excursion to Zoo or wildlife park and develop a recount. ontinu fie l d C e b ld ui in g the • Individual independent construction of an information report on an • Research an animal and construct Australian animal to be presented as a report with visuals and reference an oral presentation with peer and self list as a: assessment. - whole class • Whole class reflection: Human graph. nd - small group. I ep • Reflection on the process. o n en • Assessment of the text using c ti de ru nt checklist. n st Co Co ns nt tru Jo i ctio NAP n New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 3. Overview of language taught in the teaching, learning and assessing program A summary of the language mostly pertaining to a description as taught in the following teaching, learning and assessing program. The metalanguage that students may need in order to discuss the above language features is bolded. Text in context Language Genre Field Tenor Mode • Explore purpose, intended • Note taking structure: • Noun groups with numbers • Speech functions: • Primary tense: audience, structure and - subheadings and describers. - question (wh, yes/no) - timeless present language features of an - dot points / numbers. • Verbs: - statement (simple and - simple past. information report. compound). • Recount structure: - action (doing) • Subject verb agreement. • Oral and written reports. - mental (thinking) • Modality: - orientation • Foregrounding: • Stories have a similar purpose - events in sequence - verbal (saying) - possibility. - human – pronoun across cultures. - relational (being). - reorientation. • Interpersonal meaning: - non human – topic words. • Note taking. • Circumstances and clauses: - feelings, attitudes, • Report structure: • Coherence: • Description. - introduction with - place (location). opinions. - link between introduction, • Recount. classification • Everyday and technical • Verbal elements: body, conclusion - paragraphs dealing with vocabulary: - pronunciation - topic sentences. specific aspects. - nouns - fluency • Print conventions: • Language to build cohesion: - nominalisations. - listening quietly. - handwriting - reference items • Facts and opinions. - punctuation - articles - spelling patterns. - pronouns. • Visual literacy: • Language to expand - labels to pictures information: - layout - linking and binding - diagrams, tables, graphs conjunctions - reference to visual texts. - conjunctions between sentences. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 4. Building the Field In Building the Field, the main objective is to connect with the prior knowledge of the students, develop cultural understandings and the everyday and technical language related to Australian animals and information reports. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Connect to prior knowledge With beginners: • Brainstorm and list the names of animals. • Everyday • Orally identify pictures of animals in • Put animal names in alphabetic order. vocabulary: English and own language. - names of • Copy English words and write in first Use bilingual dictionaries if appropriate animals, birds, language/s. for students. fish • Group animals according to own - categories (eg categories (eg with fur, with 4 legs, can animals, birds, run). fish). Supplementary activities: • Make a chart of animals under various • Reference items • Location (eg in • Simple • Simple present • Make a booklet illustrated by categories (eg location, action). (eg this, it). the farm, in the statements. tense. students, using model English • Using commercial and student pictures zoo, in the sea). sentence structures (eg This is a ... • Punctuation. of animals, create a Venn diagram (eg • Common action It can … ). • Visual literacy: animals in my country and animals in verbs (eg fly, • Unjumble simple sentences about crawl, hop). - labels for Australia). animals. pictures. • Use charts to compose sentences about Extension activities: animals. • Introduce technical vocabulary (eg mammal, marsupial, reptile). • Group pictures of animals using these categories. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 5. Building the Field continued... The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Australian Animals With beginners: • Alphabet chart: • Nouns (eg names • Sort word/picture cards in alphabetic - label pictures of Australian animals of animals, birds, order. - build up an alphabetic chart of fish). • Copy names of animals on an Australian animals. • Verbal elements: alphabet proforma. • Games: - pronunciation. • Visual elements: Students can support each other to - bingo (eg match pictures/words of - link picture to identify animals during bingo game. Australian animals to names) oral/written - toss the ball (eg student A tosses soft Extension activities: words. ball to student B who says name of an • Review procedural language. Australian animal). • Students follow instructions to make • Human graph: bingo cards together. - stand in a line to show how much • Variation for bingo: Say Australian you think you know about Australian animals with a describer (eg fluffy animals (from a lot to a little) koala, smooth platypus). - tell the person next to you one thing you already know about Australian animals. • Concept map: • Technical • Speech - on sticky notes, write 2 things you know vocabulary (eg functions: and one question about what you want classification, - questions–wh to find out appearance, (eg Where do - stick notes on to large sheet, grouping behaviour, … live? What Use BSSOs to help scribe for students. them in logical ways diet, prey, do … eat? What reproduction, kind of babies - provide headings for each group at the habitat. do … have?). Provide technical terms for the end of the process (eg appearance) groupings after commonsense grouping. - identify which of the questions are still This allows students prior learning to be unanswered. acknowledged. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 6. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Build cultural knowledge Extension activities: • Read a range of poems and stories from • Stories have a • Culturally • Punctuation: • Write sentences or shape poems different cultures. similar purpose specific terms - capitals about Australian animals using action • Read stories and poems about Australian across cultures. (eg Aboriginal - full stops verbs (eg emus running, green frogs animals (eg Possum Magic, Wombat legend, Dreaming croaking). - exclamations Stew, Giant Devil Dingo) and Aboriginal stories). - speech marks. • Variation on Wombat Stew: legends involving animals (eg How the • Awareness • Spelling patterns. - write a different Wombat Stew Parrot Got Its Colours). of different recipe • Notice importance of Australian animals Aboriginal groups. - cook stew in Aboriginal stories and culture. - write up the cooking activity as a • Learn songs and rhymes about • Other cultural procedure. Australian animals (eg Kookaburra sits knowledge (eg • Research importance of Australian on the old gum tree). gumtrees). animals in Aboriginal culture. Story vs factual tests • Review purpose of stories and poems. • Review features of story books. • Technical • Discuss the purpose of different types of vocabulary (eg factual books/texts. author, illustrator, illustration, cover, • Discuss structural features of how factual title page, page, books are organised. Extension activities: index, contents). • Predict audience, genre and language • Purpose of • Awareness of • Visual literacy: • Match title cards with genre name for range of titles (eg Kangaroos, My Pet different genres. target audience. - layout of title cards. Kangaroo Hoppy). page to suit • Photocopy covers of books and genre and make posters with short book audience. reviews explaining the purpose, type and content of book. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 7. Continued... The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Build scientific knowledge Supplementary activities: • Read Big books—scientific texts: • Technical • Questions and • Visual literacy (eg • Match question card with answer - What is a mammal? vocabulary statements. how illustrations card. - What is a marsupial? (eg mammal, support meaning marsupial, reptile, in text). • Use pictures to group and paste - What is a reptile? under headings. omnivorous, • Print - What is a bird? carnivorous, • Use a taxonomic structure to conventions. • Identify technical/scientific vocabulary. herbivorous, correctly label animals. vegetarian). • Spelling patterns. • Ask questions about texts (eg Do … lay Extension activities: eggs? Can a … swim? Does a … swim • Everyday • Primary tense: - present (eg • ‘My favourite animal’ oral statements or fly? Where does a … live?). • Note taking lay- vocabulary It lives, They (eg My favourite Australian animal is • Use graphic organiser to classify out (eg sub head- (eg size, skin swim). … because I like/because it’s ….). Australian animals (eg mammals, ings, dot points or covering, numbers). movement, diet). • Write the sentences and share with a marsupials, reptiles, birds), reviewing partner. features of each group. • Human graph: • Note taking: - Would you like to be a …or a …? - use concept map to identify information (eg a kangaroo or a kookaburra). needed about Australian animals. - decide, move, justify your decision - watch video of Australian animals to the person next to you. - write two or more new facts on sticky notes and add to concept map Include labelled pictures or labelled - use headings to support note taking diagrams in note-taking activity. (eg ‘mediated journal’—Little Book with headings on each page). - build a word bank chart from notes Skin Animal Size covering Colour Movement • Use information from matrix chart to construct compound sentences. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 8. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Description Extension activities: • Language activities: • Reference items • Types of verbs: • Statements • Present tense. • Compile a table of comparatives (eg (eg they, it, that, - relational (eg using simple • Subject verb long, longer, longest, fluffy, fluffier, - build up noun groups by labelling them). have, are) and compound agreement. fluffiest). drawings or pictures of Australian - action (eg fly). sentences. animals with adjectives (describers), • Print • Write sentences using comparatives. numbers, classifiers. • Noun groups • Verbal elements: conventions: - pronunciation Supplementary activity: - complete cloze activity blocking out with numbers - punctuation describers, verbs or reference items and describers - fluency. • Write and/or illustrate descriptions of - spelling. - highlight noun groups in a descriptive (eg long sharp silly/imagined characters. • Structure of claws, soft grey • Visual literacy: text. ‘What am I?’ speckled fur, - label pictures. • Description text: description. three toes). • Foregrounding: - read model of a short description (eg What am I?) - pronoun (eg I). - work in small groups to compose similar brief descriptions to read to class - take turns guessing the animal from the description - draw an animal from a description. • Decide if statements are true or false. True or false. What am I? NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 9. Continued... The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Preparation for excursion to Zoo or Supplementary activity: Wildlife Park • Verbs: • Modality: • Build a Zoo wall or enclosure pen • Discuss and predict what students will - mental (eg - possibility (eg out of paper bricks each brick has a experience. think). maybe we will, word on it. One row could be verbs • Use Mind Journey strategy to prepare • Topic words. we might). another describers or structural students for the excursion by visualising headings, or nouns. expected behaviour, and anticipated experiences. • Prepare a mediated journal with • Questions: headings on each page (eg Food). - Yes/No • Write questions to be answered including (eg Will we ..? 3-2-1- reflection strategy: Can we …?) 3 statements - Wh questions 2 questions (eg Where will..? When 1 interesting. will …? How do …?). NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 0
  • 10. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics During excursion • Record the trip with digital camera or • Verbs: • Ask and respond video. - action (eg saw, to wh and yes/no • Complete mediated journal. touched) questions. • Informal talking, naming, asking and - saying (eg said, answering questions. told) The mind journey strategy can be used - mental (eg again now as a way of recalling the After the excursion liked) experience of the excursion, tapping • Use photos to compile a class record or - relational (eg into all the sensory input and peripheral watch video of excursion. had, was). learning that took place. Various • Vocabulary activities: recollections of sights sounds, smells - add to word lists or zoo wall and tactile stimuli will prompt memory to - match every day language with recall the learning that took place both technical terms. consciously and unconsciously. • Review understanding: • Technical • Feelings attitudes • Primary tense: Extension activities: - each student writes a question using vocabulary (eg and opinions: - past (eg arrived, • Match answers to questions about information learnt on the excursion, for night–nocturnal, - describers saw, touched). excursion. a class quiz food–diet, gum (eg nice, soft) tree–eucalyptus • Coherence: • Discuss how you would feel if you - sort information about animals - verbs (eg like, - link between were a kangaroo in the zoo, bush, tree, poisonous– - add information to a class concept map. enjoyed). introduction, park. venomous, • Reflect on excursion using a PMI (plus, • Recount squeezes– • Verbal elements: body, • Invent a new breed of Australian minus, interesting) chart in groups then structure: constricts, - pronunciation reorientation. animal describe and draw it. share responses. - orientation boy–male, girl- - fluency. • Propose what would happen if…. • Review facts and opinions. - events in female). - emus could fly • Review structure and language of a sequence - there were too many kangaroos. recount. - reorientation. • Design and make a jigsaw of an • Prepare and present oral and written • Linking and Australian animal. recount. binding conjunctions. • Discuss conservation issues. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 11. Vocabulary lists built from excursion to Cleland Widlife Park Nouns Describers Verbs Verbs Verbs Verbs action saying relational mental fur marsupial held talked have enjoyed wings nocturnal showed spoke had loved pouch muscular closed said was liked feathers carnivorous ran whispered were thought parrots omnivorous crept told are hoped bird herbivore walked called is wanted seeds eucalyptus went shouted am knew flowers poisonous listened sang guessed bottlebrush tired waited nectar ate mammal drank reptile washed prey looked lizard read bones opened possum closed muscles heard light saw air sleep snake slept poison drew camouflage wrote pushed pulled sat shed changed rode constrict NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 12. Information Reports Differentiated Texts Emus Koalas Echidnas Emus are Australian birds. Koalas are Australian animals. Echidnas are mammals. They are also monotremes because they lay eggs. They are They have feathers and lay eggs. Koalas are mammals because they have fur and called spiny ant eaters. feed their babies milk. They are the largest bird in Australia but they Echidnas have sharp spines on their back and cannot fly. Koalas look like bears but they are marsupials. tail. They are brown and have a long nose on That means they are mammals that have a Emus have two, long, strong legs and large feet their small head. They have four short legs and pouch. with thick toes. strong claws. Koalas have fluffy brown and grey fur. They have They have a large, oval shaped body. They have Adult echidnas can grow between 35-55 large, black, flat noses and small eyes. They a small head and a long, thin neck. Their beak is centimetres long and weigh up to 5 kilograms. have short legs and arms with strong claws on short and pointy. Their feathers are black, brown Tasmanian echidnas are black. their hands and feet which are used for climbing. and white. Adults can grow up to 2 metres tall Echidnas live in bush land. They hide under and can weigh 60 kilograms or more. Koalas live in eucalyptus trees and they only eat bushes, between rocks or in hollow logs. these kinds of leaves. They only live in Australia. Emus are only found in Australia and can live in They spend most of their time at the top of gum Sometimes they make burrows to hide in. They most areas. trees. only live in Australia. Emus can run very fast. As much as 50 Koalas only have one baby at a time. It is born Echidnas eat ant and termites. They dig into the kilometres an hour. without fur and is very tiny so it stays in the ants’ nest with their sharp claws and lick up the Emus eat berries, leaves, seeds, flowers, fruit, mother’s pouch drinking milk. When the baby is ants with their long sticky tongues. plants and even insects like grasshoppers. big enough to come out of the pouch it rides on Female echidnas lay only one egg at a time. the mother’s back. The hen lays 6–12 large dark green eggs in a When the tiny baby hatches it is as big as a jelly nest. Koalas are an endangered species in some bean. A tiny baby echidna is called a puggle. It parts of Australia. stays in its mothers pouch until its spines grow. The male sits on the eggs to keep them warm. Then it lives in the burrow They usually hatch after 8–10 weeks. The young chicks have brown feathers with white stripes which make it hard for them to be seen in the grass. The male protects the young chicks from enemies such as dingoes and eagles. Emus have been farmed since about 1970 for their meat, feathers and also for oil which is used for making cosmetics. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 13. Continued... Information Reports Differentiated Texts Emus Koalas Echidnas Lizards Emus are birds because they have Koalas are Australian animals. Echidnas are mammals. They are also Lizards are animals and they belong to the feathers and lay eggs. They are the largest They are mammals because they have fur monotremes because they lay eggs. They reptile family. bird in Australia but they cannot fly. and feed their babies milk. are called spiny ant eaters. There are many different types of lizards. Emus have two, long, strong legs and large Koalas are also marsupials because they Echidnas have sharp spines on their back Goanna, frill necked, gecko, blue tongue feet with thick toes. They have a large, are mammals that have a pouch. and tail. They are brown and have a long and thorny devil are all types of Australian oval shaped body, a long, thin neck, a nose on their small head. They have four lizards. small head and a short, pointy beak. Their Koalas have soft brown and grey fur on short legs and strong claws. their round bodies and white fur on their Some lizards such as skinks are tiny but feathers are black, brown and white. The Adult echidnas can grow between 35- many are large. Goannas can grow up to adults can grow up to 2 metres tall and can chest. It is thick and warm. They have fluffy ears, large, black, flat noses and small 55 centimetres long and weigh up to 5 two metres long. Lizards usually have long weigh 60 kilograms or more. kilograms. Tasmanian echidnas are black. tails. eyes. Their mouth is also small. Emus are only found in Australia and live Echidnas live in bush land. They hide Most lizards have four legs so they can mainly in bushland and grassy areas. Large sharp claws on their feet and hands are used for climbing trees. They also have under bushes, between rocks or in hollow move very quickly. They can run and climb. However they are very hardy birds and can logs. There are some lizards called legless live in most places. sharp teeth for chewing leaves. Sometimes they make burrows to hide in. lizards that don’t have any legs. They slide They can run very fast with their powerful Koalas live in eucalyptus trees in the bush. and move like snakes. Lizards have scaly They only live in Australia. Koalas are They only live in Australia. legs even up to 50 kilometres an hour. skin which is smooth. They also change They often travel a long way each day nocturnal animals so they sleep in the high Echidnas eat ants and termites. They dig their skin when they grow. looking for food. branches most of the day and are awake at into the ants’ nest with their sharp claws night-time eating and moving around. and lick up the ants with their long sticky Lizards have cold blood so they lie in the Emus eat berries, leaves, seeds, tongues. sun to keep warm. If it is too hot or too flowers, fruit, plants and even insects like Koalas only eat gum leaves and they cold they hide under rocks or leaves for grasshoppers. usually don’t need to drink water because Female echidnas lay only one egg at a protection. they get enough moisture from the tender time. When the tiny baby hatches it is as The male emu builds a nest of small sticks young leaves. big as a jelly bean. A tiny baby echidna Lizards have two small holes on their and leaves then the hen lays between is called a puggle. It stays in its mothers heads that are used for hearing. Some 6–12 large dark green eggs. Usually Female koalas only have one baby at a lizards have hard tongues which are used time. pouch until its spines grow. Then it lives in female birds look after the eggs but emus the burrow. like teeth, but others have long thin ones. are different. The tiny baby crawls up into the mother’s Lizards live in rainforests, deserts and they The male sits on the eggs to keep them pouch. It is born without fur so it stays in can be found under rocks and in trees. warm until they hatch. This usually takes the mother’s pouch drinking milk. Some lizards can change their colour about 8–10 weeks. The young chicks have When the baby is big enough to come out because they need to hide. This is called brown feathers with white stripes which of the pouch it rides on the mother’s back. camouflage. Lizards use camouflage as make it hard for them to be seen in the Koalas are an endangered species in protection from their enemies. grass. some parts of Australia. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 14. Continued... Information Reports Differentiated Texts Emus Koalas Echidnas Lizards This kind of camouflage helps protect them Lizards eat insects, plants and tiny animals from predators. The male also protects like snails, slugs and mice. Some lizards the young chicks from enemies such as eat birds’ eggs. Gekos hunt insects at night dingoes and eagles. The young emus stay and they are the only lizards that make a with their father for about a year before noise. Blue Tongue lizards eat plants and they leave to go and find a mate. small animals during the day. Emus have been farmed since about 1970 Lizards lay eggs but when the eggs are for their meat and also for oil which is used hatched they parents don’t look after the for making cosmetics. babies. The young lizards must find their own food. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 15. Modelling/Text Deconstruction In Modelling/Deconstruction, the main objective is to develop students’ understandings of the purpose, structure and language features of the information report genre. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Purpose and audience • Use extracts from recounts and reports • Purpose of a • Intended to identify genre, discuss purpose and report. audience. audience. • Read a range of reports and reflect on purpose, audience. Deconstruct reports • Identify and discuss: • Structure: • Verbs: • Factual • Primary tense: - structure of reports - introduction with - action (eg sentences. - present (eg - use of bold print, headings classification sleeps, eats) lives, eats). - type of words that start the sentences - paragraphs - relational (eg • Foregrounding: - linking and binding conjunctions dealing with has, is). - topic words (eg specific snakes). - types of verbs used Students have individual copies of the aspects. - whether facts or opinions included • Punctuation same text to highlight identified features. • Conjunctions (eg (eg capitals, full - tense and, or, so, but, stops, commas). - print conventions when, because, - some spelling patterns after). • Visual literacy (eg - use of diagrams, labels, tables, graphs. diagrams, labels, tables, graphs). • Cloze activities. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 16. Lizards Complete cloze activity Lizards are ............................ . Lizards are reptiles. There are ....................... different kinds of lizards. Lizards have ....................... blood. They have ........................... skin. Lizards have ............. holes. Most lizards have ................. legs. Lizards .................. hard tongues. Lizards have ..................... tails. Lizards .................... in the bush. Lizards live under .................. and in trees. Lizards ............. insects, ................ and tiny animals. .......................... can climb. Lizards change their .......................... when they grow. Some lizards can change ................... to hide. Lizards can crawl ................... run. They move very quickly. Lizards .............. eggs. Can you write these words where they belong. can lay colour eat rocks and skin Lizards scaly many animals lots cold plants live ear four have long NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 17. Cut into sections. Sort and paste in correct sequence or match Appearance Title Diet sections to headings of the report. Koalas Koalas are Australian animals. Koalas are mammals because they have fur and feed their babies milk. Koalas look like bears but they are marsupials. General Classification That means they are mammals that have a pouch. Koalas have fluffy brown and grey fur. They have large, black, flat noses and small eyes. They have short legs and arms with strong claws on their hands and feet which are used for climbing. Behaviour Koalas live in eucalyptus trees and they only eat these kind of leaves. Reproduction They only live in Australia. They spend most of their time at the top of gum trees. Koalas only have one baby at a time. It is born without fur and is very tiny so it stays in the mother’s pouch Habitat drinking milk. When the baby is big enough to come out of the pouch it rides on the mother’s back. Koalas are an endangered species in some parts of Australia. Special features NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 18. Sort information Emus Classification: Emus have two, long, strong legs and large feet with thick toes. They have a large, oval shaped body, a long, thin neck, a small head and a short, pointy beak. Their feathers are black, brown and white. The adults can grow up to 2 metres tall and can weigh 60 kilograms or more. Appearance: Koalas have soft brown and grey fur on their round bodies and white fur on their chest. It is thick and warm. They have fluffy ears, large, black, flat noses and small eyes. Their mouth is also small. Food: Female koalas only have one baby at a time. Emus eat berries, leaves, seeds, flowers, fruit, plants and even insects like grasshoppers. Location: Emus are birds because they have feathers and lay eggs. They are the largest bird in Australia but they cannot fly. Reproduction: Koalas only eat gum leaves and they usually don’t need to drink water because they get enough moisture from the tender young leaves. Care for young: The male sits on the eggs to keep them warm until they hatch. This usually takes about 8–10 weeks. The young chicks have brown feathers with white stripes which make it hard for them to be seen in the grass. Other intersting facts: The tiny baby crawls up into the mother’s pouch. It is born without fur so it stays in the mother’s pouch drinking milk. Large sharp claws on their feet and hands are used for climbing trees. They also have sharp teeth for chewing leaves. They can run very fast with their powerful legs even up to 50 kilometres an hour. They often travel a long way Koalas each day looking for food. Classification: Koalas are an endangered species in some parts of Australia. This kind of camouflage helps protect them from predators. The male also protects the young chicks from Appearance: enemies such as dingoes and eagles. The young emus stay with their father for about a year before they leave to go and find a mate. Koalas are also marsupials because they are mammals that have a pouch. Food: Emus have been farmed since about 1970 for their meat and also for oil which is used for making cosmetics. Location: Koalas are Australian animals. When the baby is big enough to come out of the pouch it rides on the mother’s back. Reproduction: They are mammals because they have fur and feed their babies milk. Emus are only found in Australia and live mainly in bushland and grassy areas. However they are very hardy birds and can live in most places. Care for young: Koalas live in eucalyptus trees in the bush. They only live in Australia. Koalas are nocturnal animals so they sleep in the high branches most of the day and are awake at night-time eating and moving around. Other intersting facts: The male emu builds a nest of small sticks and leaves then the hen lays between 6–12 large dark green eggs. Usually female birds look after the eggs but emus are different. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 
  • 19. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Follow up activities Use both common terms as well as • Make a chart of structural and language • Cohesion: • Noun groups: • Spelling: technical language for headings (eg features to display in class. - reference items - number (eg all - words with appearance—looks like, behaviour— • Match chunks of information to structural (eg it, they, koalas, some same spelling what it does, habitat—place it lives, headings. themselves) koalas, most pattern diet—prey food, reproduction—having - conjunctions koalas). - words with babies). • Cut two reports into sentences strips. Sort and match sentences between • Verbs: same sound Supplementary activities: under headings to form two separate sentences (eg - action (eg eats) pattern. • Use an oral activity to organise information reports about two animals. However, As a - relational (eg sentences into structure: result). • Discuss sections of the report and has). - predetermine locations in class for identify: each section of report - order of information - each student reads aloud - conjunctions between sentences information on a sentence strip - use of reference items. - as a class decide where the student should move to • Create a glossary by matching meanings to technical words. - each group decides order of sentences • Write simple sentences using action and - paste strips on large structural chart relational verbs and starting with topic words. - as a class, check order. • Join beginning and end of sentences • Reflect on process of sorting oral emphasising recognition of verb types. or written sentences using “Sticky“ questions: - What clues did you use? - Where did you get stuck? - How did you get unstuck? Add to glossary regularly. Matching facts to proforma NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 20
  • 20. Lizards – Match beginings and ends of sentences • Lizards are animals. • Lizards have scaly skin. • Lizards are reptiles. • Lizards live in the bush. • Lizards have hard tongues. • Lizards can climb. • Most lizards have four legs. • Lizards have ear holes. • Lizards lay eggs. NAPNew Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 21. Lizards – Match beginings and ends of sentences continued... • Lizards have cold blood. • Lizards have long tails. • They can move very quickly. • Lizards can crawl and run. • Lizards change their skin when they grow. • Lizards live under rocks and trees. • Some lizards change colour and hide. • There are lots of different kinds of lizards. • Lizards eat insects, plants and tiny animals. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 22
  • 22. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics • Teach and practise process of • Nominalisation nominalisation in text. Identify use in (eg move— texts. movement, • Introduce modal words and identify in reproduce— • Modality: texts. reproduction, - possibility (eg describe— • Check subject-verb agreement by Koalas can …. • Subject verb description, matching beginning and end of sentence Koalas might … agreement (eg It classify— (eg It …lives in, They … live in). Koalas will...). lives. They live). classification). • Complete cloze exercises where missing Actions and rhyme to remember word is either action or relational verb structural features: including both attribute and classification/ - Title: tap head. Say tap tap title definition (eg Koalas are mammals. - Classification: clap. Say clap clap Koalas have thick fur). classification • Learn action rhyme mnemonic to - Description: do a little dance remember the structural features. - Appearance: make a smiley face. • Create own rap/mnemonic to remember Say app app appy appearance the structural features of an information - Behaviour: bend. Say bend bend report and behaviour - Habitat: hop hop. Say hop hop habitat - Diet: drinking action. Say d d diet - Reproduction: roll hands. Say roll roll reproduction - Interesting facts: point finger in. Say interesting facts. Fold arms when saying facts. Mnemonic rhyme NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 23. Lizards Lizards are animals and they belong to the reptile family. Lizards live in rainforests, deserts and they can be found under rocks and in conjunction trees. conjunction reference There are many different types of lizards. Goanna, frill necked, gecko, blue tongue and thorny devil are all types of Australian lizards. Some lizards can change their colour because they need to hide. This conjunction is called camouflage. Lizards use camouflage as protection from their enemies. Some lizards such as skinks, are tiny but many are large. Goannas can grow up to two metres long. Lizards usually have long tails. conjunction modality reference Lizards eat insects, plants and tiny animals like snails, slugs and mice. Some lizards eat birds’ eggs. Geckos hunt insects at night and they are the Most lizards have four legs so they can move very quickly. They can run only lizards that make a noise. Blue Tongue lizards eat plants and small and climb. There are some lizards called legless lizards that don’t have any animals during the day. legs. They slide and move like snakes. Lizards have scaly skin which is modality modality smooth. They also change their skin when they grow. reference conjunction manner-simile conjunction Lizards lay eggs but when the eggs are hatched. The parents don’t look after the babies. The young lizards must find their own food. Lizards have cold blood so they lie in the sun to keep warm. If it is too hot or too cold they hide under rocks or leaves for protection. Reference Modality nominalisation Conjunctions words words Similies Nominalisations Lizards have two small holes on their heads, that are used for hearing. but they must like protection because their very snakes Some lizards have hard tongues which are used like teeth, but others have and ones usually long thin ones. so this also reference if NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 24. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics • Make a Little Book of the organisational Some students could make the Little and language features used to write an • Speech • Visual elements: Book bilingual. Some students may information report about living things. functions: need the support of BSSOs. - using concept • Fill in a concept map using the - questions map. Practise note making while completing information in a report. - statements. concept map. Reflection • Conduct a 3-2-1-activity about the content of the model report, and another one about the organisational and language features of a report. ce Concept map ha n bi a ra ta pe t p a Name ............... Name diet ur reproduction cl av io as si be h fic at io n NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 25. Joint Construction In Joint Construction, the teacher and students construct a written argument together. Through this process, the teacher scaffolds the students’ choices and at the same time moves them towards independent construction. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Joint construction—whole class • Negotiate which Australian animal to • Audience. • Design features write about. (eg colour, • Discuss how the report will be presented layout, headings, to another class (eg a booklet/Big Book/ font, pictures, poster). drawings). • Discuss links between presentation and audience. • Research: - use concept map structure to identify Supplementary activities: what we know and what we need to find • Use questions as an organisational out about aid in planning what information - use resources provided to write notes needs to be collected for the report. for missing information • Use a Q Matrix or Q Cube to provide - order information. a range of question starters. • Writing: Provide a selection of texts at suitable - write notes as sentences on strips of reading level, to find information. paper in single sentences Include visual texts. - place these sentence strips on to large • Structural sheet of paper which has the structural headings. headings as a scaffold - read and then reflect on the placement. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 26. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics - make adjustments (eg build up noun • Reference items • Noun groups. • Present tense. groups, rearrange sentence placement (eg they, their, • Subject-verb to improve clarity and complexity of ones) agreement. report, improve use of reference items). • Visual literacy: • Add visual texts: - pictures with - label a commercial or drawn picture of labels Labels can also be written in first the animal language. - life cycle. - review features of a life cycle, draw a Completed report can be copied by life cycle of the animal • Punctuation for bibliography. each student. Individual variation is in - review how to use and refer to visual Checklist for my written information colours, font size, placement of visual text. report • Reference to text. Does my report have a … visual texts (eg • Add references: the diagram - teach how to record references used Title shows). - write a reference list. Classification sentence Labelling Evaluation Description of: • Use a checklist of features of a report in appearance (what it looks like) the Little Book to evaluate the success of the report. size shape colour body parts behaviour (what it can do) habitat (where it lives) diet (what it eats) reproduction (does it make babies or lay eggs) special features Labelled diagram Life cycle Reference list NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 27. Continued... The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Joint construction—small group Students follow similar procedure • An animal is chosen by each group. to whole class joint construction for • Each group identifies what they know research. and what they need to find out. Alternative strategy: • Each group member selects a section of • Each group works on same topic. the report and researches and records • Notes could be on cards. that information. • Each group is responsible for • Groups check their report against a extending notes into complete text. checklist, edit and conference with teacher. • Use Mrs Potter’s questions to evaluate how they worked as a team: - What was the purpose of the task? - What worked well? - What would you do differently? - What do you need help with? • Groups prepare for oral reports to rest of class: - reminder of audience and presentation skills • Structure: • Verbal elements: - develop/review oral report criteria. - greeting - pronunciation. - report - volume • Feedback: - closing. - eye contact - complete feedback sheets for self and others - listening quietly. - provide feedback to others. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 28. Independent Construction In Independent Construction, students independently construct an argument as the summative task for this topic for this teaching, learning and assessing program. The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Research, construct, present Feedback checklist for oral information report presentation Students are applying knowledge, • Use processes introduced in joint skills and language choices developed construction to research and construct Name of presenter ...................................................................... throughout the teaching and learning an information report about an Australian Did she/he... Yes No Sometimes cycle to produce the summative animal. Include labelled diagrams, life assessment task. cycles, references. Say greeting • Students self edit then conference first Say name draft with peer and teacher. Say title of report • Redraft and submit final draft. • Practice oral presentation of reports in Look at audience groups of three. Speak loudly enough • Using a checklist the group gives feedback on the presentation to the Speak clearly presenter. Not speak too fast • Each student gives final presentation to a small group of students in another class. Did the report • Peers monitor this presentation using a Have a picture of the animal checklist. Have a life cycle Give enough information Interest you Write a comment NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 2
  • 29. NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report 0
  • 30. Continued... The activities on the left column will provide particular development in these areas Supplementary and extension Activities Genre Field Tenor Mode activities. Comments are in italics Reflection • Compare first human graph on • Human Graph: stand on a line to show Australian animals and these final how much you think you know about graphs. Australian animals now. • Students share the most interesting thing they learnt and what was the most fun. • Repeat Human Graph to show how much you know about writing information reports. Australian Animals Reference Books Knowles, S (1988) Edward the Emu, Harper Collins Vaughan, M. K.(1984) Wombat Stew, Ashton Scholastic Fox, Mem (1988) Koala Lou, Puffin J. Brian & C. Johns (2001) Silly Galah, Ashton Scholastic Cawthorne. W.A. (1988) Who Killed Cockatoo, M Hamilton Books Clement, R (2002) Olga the Brolga, Harper & Collins Chichester, E (1998) I love you Blue Kangaroo, Clark Harper & Collins Fox, Mem (1983) Possum Magic, Ashton Scholastic Fox, Mem (1995) Wombat Divine, Omnibus NAP New Arrivals Program Teaching, Learning and Assessment Programs Australian Animals Developing an Information Report