Imagine Austin, second Community Forums presentation

1,811 views
1,732 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,811
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
197
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Imagine Austin, second Community Forums presentation

  1. 1. Imagine Austin Comprehensive Plan Community Forum Series #2 April 27, 28, May 1, 2010
  2. 2. Community Forum #2 - Agenda • Comprehensive Plan Refresher • Planning Process Overview • Trends Affecting Austin’s Future • Articulating the Vision • Draft Vision Statement Components • Today’s Activities • Imagine Austin Chip Exercise • Visualizing Land Use and Density
  3. 3. Comprehensive Plan Refresher What the Comprehensive Plan is • An expression of the community’s shared values, aspirations, and vision for the future • The policy foundation for decision-making to proactively manage growth and change • The City’s “to-do” list defining an action program and priorities to be implemented over time
  4. 4. Comprehensive Plan Refresher City Council’s Three Goals • Community Engagement • Broad public engagement • Values and aspirations of Austin’s community • Sustainability • Specifically for Austin • Future environment, economy, and community • Implementation • Strategic focus on implementation • Realistic action agenda and measure progress
  5. 5. Comprehensive Plan Refresher Why is the Plan important to residents? • How can Austin be better for you and your family over the next 5, 10, 20, and 30 years? • How can it improve quality of life (e.g., parks, schools, jobs, transit, waking, and biking)? • What short-term steps can be taken to achieve this? • What longer-term strategies can make Austin a great city for the next generation? • What we hear from you will directly inform the Plan’s vision, goals, strategies, and actions.
  6. 6. Planning Process Overview Imagine Austin Schedule Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Plan Kickoff Vision and Plan Framework Comprehensive Plan Document 1. Project Orientation and 1. Articulating the Vision 1. Draft Plan Development Design Community Forum Series #1 Community Forum Series #4 Public Participation Plan (Nov. 2009) (Winter 2011) 2. Project Kickoff and 2. Dynamics of Change 2. Plan Adoption Follow-up Community Forum Series #2 Public Hearings Comprehensive Plan Open (April/May 2010) House (Sep. 2009) City Council Adoption 3. Plan Framework Community Forum Series #3 (Fall 2010) Aug. – Oct. 2009 Nov. 2009 – Dec. 2010 Jan. 2011 - 2012
  7. 7. Trends Affecting Austin’s Future Demographic and Population Trends • Annual population growth of 3-4% Population Trends and Projections (1950-2000). • Recent growth (2000-2010) is occurring at a slightly slower pace and mostly at the edges of City. • Regional population is projected to grow at rates higher than the City of Austin over the next 20 years. • Undeveloped land in the ETJ is seeing increased development pressure following the completion of Source: U.S. Census Bureau and City of Austin SH130 and other developments. • Projected increase of approximately 750,000 people and 300,000 jobs in the City of Austin and the ETJ by 2040.
  8. 8. Trends Affecting Austin’s Future Land Consumption and Redevelopment • About 46% of rangeland was converted to urban uses from 1983-2000 (in MSA). • Developed areas increased, while agriculture, rangeland, and forested land use decreased. • Recent demolition permits show significant redevelopment in Austin. • GIS analysis shows that there continues to be potential for more redevelopment and infill (e.g., along low-density commercial corridors including Burnet Rd, Airport Blvd) in Austin.
  9. 9. Trends Affecting Austin’s Future Housing and Income • Housing prices have increased significantly over the last ten years, while household incomes have remained stagnant or declined. • This trend is more prevalent in Hispanic and African-American households, compared with the overall population. • The rise in housing prices vs. incomes over the past 10 years is creating an affordable housing gap: • Only 28% of single-family homes are affordable to households earning 80% of the MFI, compared with 42% in 1998. Sources: HUD, Comprehensive Housing Market Study (2007), Census (2000-2007).
  10. 10. Trends Affecting Austin’s Future Transportation and Economic Trends Austin’s Transportation Mode Split (2008) • While transit use is increasing, automobiles remain the dominant travel mode the region. • New high-tech focus is emerging: medical/life science, clean energy (Mueller smart-grid) creative tech (gaming, media), data centers, and professional services. • National forecasts indicated that Austin will be one of the first metro areas to recover from the recession (Forbes, MSNBC, Moody’s).
  11. 11. Articulating the Vision Public Input • Over 6,800 residents participated • November Forum, Meetings-in-a-Box, Online and Paper Surveys, Statistically Valid Survey • Task Force used input to begin drafting vision (March Vision Workshop) • Draft Vision reviewed by Task Force (April) • Public review today through June, followed by review by Plan Commission and City Council
  12. 12. Articulating the Vision Statistically Valid Survey – Top Strengths • Arts, music, and cultural amenities (79%) • University of Texas (76%) • State Capital (75%) • Unique local identity (74%) • Parks and Open Space (73%) Potential Areas - Growth and Development • Near public transit stations and routes (56%) • Centers outside of downtown (50%) • Along roadway corridors (43%)
  13. 13. Articulating the Vision Statistically Valid Survey – Future Vision • Quality public schools (38%) • Affordable tax rate (32%) • Affordable housing (28%) • High paying jobs (27%) Capital Improvements Allocation ($100) • Improve the transportation system ($25) • Health and human services ($21) • Repair infrastructure ($16) • Public safety facilities ($13)
  14. 14. Articulating the Vision Online Surveys, CF#1, Meetings-in-a-Box: Top Ideas for the Future • Improve public transit system • Reduce roadway congestion • Protect the environment • Leader in sustainability • Diverse, unique neighborhoods • Dense, compact city • Predicable planning process and goals • Engaged citizens, participation
  15. 15. Draft Vision Statement Components Opening Statement: On its 200th anniversary (2039), Austin is recognized worldwide for its • exceptional livability and vibrant creativity; • its leadership in the arts, education and technology; • and its commitment to environmental responsibility, economic opportunity, and social equity. Through the efforts of our engaged community working in collaboration with local government, civic organizations, and businesses, we maintain an outstanding and fertile environment in which to nurture the next generation of proud Austinites. The Austin we Love is…
  16. 16. Draft Vision Statement Components The Austin we Love is: • Livable …See the Vision Survey, provide comments • Prosperous • Natural and Sustainable • Functional and Accessible • Caring and Committed • Stimulating and Creative Draft Vision “Word Cloud”
  17. 17. Today’s Activities Review of Draft Vision Statement Components • Stations around the room Imagine Austin Chip Exercise • This is your opportunity to create a future plan for Austin! • Group will use the CHIPS AND MARKERS to create a GROWTH CONCEPT MAP • Provides a GENERAL guide for development/preservation, not a Future Land Use Map • Group results will be used to develop three alterative scenarios (vote in Fall 2010)
  18. 18. Imagine Austin Chip Exercise Develop a Future Scenario for Austin • Population and employment are projected to grow over the next 30 yrs Population Projection Employment Projection +750,000 +300,000 new residents new jobs (+ 1.9 % Per Year) (+ 1.5 – 1.3% Per Year) in Austin and ETJ 2010 – 2039 Based on City of Austin projections
  19. 19. Imagine Austin Chip Exercise Develop a Future Scenario for Austin Step 1 Open Space • Indicate major areas that should be set aside and protected as open space / natural areas Step 2 Land Use • Discuss land use chips • Set currently on the table reflects current land use trends • Consider implications of land use decisions on transportation, the environment, and sustainability • Trade chips into banker to change land use trends • Trading examples • Trade low density for high density residential to reduce development footprint • Trade residential and commercial for mixed use to achieve greater compactness • Place chips on map • A chip on an undeveloped area represents greenfield development • A chip on an existing use represents infill/redevelopment Step 3 Transportation • Place transportation chips to serve land use patterns
  20. 20. Imagine Austin Chip Exercise Existing Base Map
  21. 21. Visualizing Land Use and Density Mixed Use Transportation Residential Open Space Commercial Industrial 1 mi2 1 mi
  22. 22. Visualizing Land Use and Density Mixed Use • Regional urban hub • Highest densities of jobs and people • Highly walkable • Supports high-capacity transit • Residential mostly high rise • Includes full spectrum of employment opportunities • Significant collection of commercial uses and residences • Supports high-capacity transit • Residential includes townhouses, row houses, and multifamily • Includes offices and community- serving retail
  23. 23. Visualizing Land Use and Density Mixed Use • Local focus • Highly walkable • Supports transit • Moderately dense residential includes small-lot single family, duplexes, townhouses, and apartments • Commercial focus on local retail, services, and entertainment • Similar to Neighborhood Center, but linear
  24. 24. Visualizing Land Use and Density 30,000 people and 10,000 jobs can be accommodated with 1 Regional Center + 2 Town Centers 4 Neighborhood Centers 4 Mixed Use Corridors
  25. 25. Visualizing Land Use and Density Predominantly Residential • Large and small apartment complexes • Incidental convenience shopping • Local examples include: • East Riverside Drive • Far West Boulevard/Greystone Drive • East Stassney Lane/Little Texas Lane • Primarily single-family houses, with small number of duplexes and medium-sized apartment complexes • Incidental convenience shopping • Local examples include: • Most of the established neighborhoods in Austin
  26. 26. Visualizing Land Use and Density Predominantly Residential • Single-family housing on very large lots • Local examples include: • Newer developments • Houses located on the edges of Austin • Single-family housing on very large lots (2 acres or larger) • Local examples include: • Areas with a rural feel • Houses located on the edges of Austin or in the county
  27. 27. Visualizing Land Use and Density 15,000 people can be accommodated with 1 High Density Residential 3 Medium Density Residential 6 Low Density Residential 30 Very Low Density Residential
  28. 28. Visualizing Land Use and Density Predominantly Commercial • Uses include stores and services (shopping, dry cleaning, daycare) • Often isolated from residential areas • Most easily accessible by car • Local examples include: • Lakeline Mall area • Tech Ridge • South Park Meadows • Includes major employment centers • Dominated by offices • Local examples include: • Area around IBM in North Austin • Medical district around Seton in Central Austin
  29. 29. Visualizing Land Use and Density Predominantly Industrial • Includes major employment centers • Characterized by warehouses, offices, and manufacturing • Most easily accessible by car • Local examples include: • Along Burnett Road north of US 183 • Southeast of Ben White Boulevard and IH-35 • Along St Elmo Road between South Congress Avenue and IH-35
  30. 30. Visualizing Land Use and Density 2,500 jobs can be accommodated with 1 Retail/Services 1 Office 1 Industry
  31. 31. Visualizing Land Use and Density Mixed Use Equivalents (other combinations possible) = = =
  32. 32. Visualizing Land Use and Density Transportation
  33. 33. Visualizing Land Use and Density Transportation
  34. 34. Group Exercise Considerations: Transportation • Higher densities support more robust transit service • Rules of Thumb • 16 people/acre can support transit every 30 minutes • 30-50 people/acre can support transit every 10 minutes • 85 people/acre can support intensified transit
  35. 35. Group Exercise Considerations: Cost of Providing Infrastructure • Cost of infrastructure decreases as density increases • Serving close-in infill development costs less than outlying greenfield development • Redevelopment/infill require higher densities, infrastructure upgrades The Costs of Alternative Development Patterns: A Review of the Literature. Frank, James E.Washington, DC: The Urban Land Institute.
  36. 36. Group Exercise Considerations: Environment Runoff by Density • Development is limited in 20000 sensitive environmental areas 18000 (e.g., floodplain, Barton Springs 16000 Watershed, steep slopes) Runoff per dwelling unit (ft3/year) 14000 • Stormwater runoff per unit 12000 decreases as density increases 10000 • Mobile sources contribute to over 8000 60% of Austin’s air pollution 6000 problem 4000 2000 0 0 4 8 12 Dwelling units per acre Protecting Water Resources with Higher‐Density Development, US EPA 2006. 12  du/acre value extrapolated
  37. 37. Group Exercise Questions to Consider • What areas should be preserved? Where should new open space be located? • Where should new growth go in the region? Where should people and jobs be? • How will we plan for increased travel within the region? How will people get around? • How should the cost of providing services and environmental impacts affect development patterns? Available Map Resources • Austin Metropolitan Area Transportation Plan • Future Road Projects • Capital Metro All Systems Go • Know Your Watershed Long Range Transit Plan (2025) • 2007 Employees per Acre • Central Texas Greenprint for Growth • 2009 Bike and Pedestrian Plan • Envision Central Texas Vision Map • 2009 Combined Future Land Use Map • Existing and Potential Trails and Greenways
  38. 38. Imagine Austin Chip Exercise Develop a Future Scenario for Austin Step 1 Open Space • Indicate major areas that should be set aside and protected as open space / natural areas Step 2 Land Use • Discuss land use chips • Set currently on the table reflects current land use trends • Consider implications of land use decisions on transportation, the environment, and sustainability • Trade chips into banker to change land use trends • Trading examples • Trade low density for high density residential to reduce development footprint • Trade residential and commercial for mixed use to achieve greater compactness • Place chips on map • A chip on an undeveloped area represents greenfield development • A chip on an existing use represents infill/redevelopment Step 3 Transportation • Place transportation chips to serve land use patterns

×