Why Users Won't Jump Through Library E-Book Hoops and How to Fix It - Speaking Points

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This presentation combines highlights from two 2014 ER&L presentations: Never Mind I’ll Just Buy It: Why Users Won’t Jump Through Your Hoops and DDA 2.0: Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books. …

This presentation combines highlights from two 2014 ER&L presentations: Never Mind I’ll Just Buy It: Why Users Won’t Jump Through Your Hoops and DDA 2.0: Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books.

Via an entertaining compare and contrast, this presentation explores disconnects between e-books via library PDA and third-party platforms compared to “real world” resources such as Kindle e-books.
Then, the presenter will show how UConn Libraries PDA program is quite successful from an acquisitions perspective, but access to DRM-encased e-books is a less than ideal user experience and share how UConn Libraries is working to provide access to thousands of DRM-free e-books while only purchasing titles with highest use.

The purpose is to illustrate how library resources and commercial resources aim to meet user needs in radically different ways, and how libraries can fix it.

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  • 1. May 6, 2014 This work is licensed Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. Why Users Won’t Jump Through Library E-Book Hoops and How To Fix It Galadriel Chilton galadriel.chilton@lib.uconn.edu Abstract This presentation combines highlights from two 2014 ER&L presentations: Never Mind I’ll Just Buy It: Why Users Won’t Jump Through Your Hoops and DDA 2.0: Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books. Via an entertaining compare and contrast, this presentation explores disconnects between e-books via library PDA and third-party platforms compared to “real world” resources such as Kindle e-books. Then, the presenter will show how UConn Libraries PDA program is quite successful from an acquisitions perspective, but access to DRM-encased e-books is a less than ideal user experience and share how UConn Libraries is working to provide access to thousands of DRM-free e-books while only purchasing titles with highest use. The purpose is to illustrate how library resources and commercial resources aim to meet user needs in radically different ways, and how libraries can fix it. Image Talking Points Hello! Today I’m going to share with you highlights from two 2014 ER&L presentations – the first entitled Never Mind I’ll Just Buy It: Why Users Won’t Jump Through Your Hoops, I co- presented with my colleague Joelle Thomas and the second was entitled DDA 2.0: Evidence Based Selection of E-Books. Let’s begin with a comparison of Kindle e-book access to Library e-book access; specifically e- books via third-party platforms.
  • 2. May 6, 2014 This work is licensed Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. Image Talking Points Kindle e-books: three clicks or taps and you have your e-book and it can be accessed on a Kindle or any device with a Kindle app. Library e-book access – long, text-heavy instructions on how to access an e-book on your computer, download it, and maybe transfer it to another device. To download e-books from some platforms, we are inflicting 1 minute and 43 seconds of pain on our users, and it’s more if a user doesn’t have an EBSCO account already. If a user misses the small print, than, the book can’t be transferred to another device. Once you’re done with the e-book, deleting it from Adobe Digital Editions doesn’t really mean that you’re deleting it. Another example of text heavy, detailed instructions, that when encountered by one faculty member, prompted them to ask: “Why is the library buying e-books that are so hard to use?”
  • 3. May 6, 2014 This work is licensed Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. Image Talking Points Truth. Yet, more and more people are acquiring the devices to read e-books. E-book readership is going up. Yet, many library users don’t know that libraries offer e-books. And those that do, suffer. We have assumptions dissonance. Since 2003, users have been expecting e-objects with intuitive, easy to user interfaces.
  • 4. May 6, 2014 This work is licensed Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. Image Talking Points Yet, we seem to want them to expect the complex gadget with many pages of instructions. We are not meeting users’ expectations, and… Complexity isn’t an excuse. Piracy isn’t an excuse either. Instead, we need to build new models of acquiring e-books.
  • 5. May 6, 2014 This work is licensed Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. Image Talking Points So that users aren’t encountering closed doors… Or having to settle for less. Especially when they are used to e-journal article access of one-click PDFs. And when we can provide e-book access within the context of our already-subscribed e-journal content. So, I did some analysis of our PDA profiles and use…
  • 6. May 6, 2014 This work is licensed Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. Image Talking Points And had an idea that could bring us closer to the DRM-free, unlimited simultaneous user, user- driven, title-by-title e-book access that we need, and that users expect. Oxford is piloting title-by-title instead packages. We’re in an evidence and usage-based acquisitions pilot of content with Gale for Archives Unbound, Wiley for e-books, and Multi Science Publishing for specialized e-journal articles. As I understand, Taylor & Francis, SAGE, and Alexander Street Press already have or are working on evidence/usage based acquisition models. There are also new models of opening and expanding e-book access such as Knowledge Unlatched (http://www.knowledgeunlatched.org/) and Gluejar (http://www.gluejar.com/). This needed so that we can unlock access to e- books and other content… And provide users with a lovely experience to the information they seek.
  • 7. May 6, 2014 This work is licensed Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 4.0 International License. Image Talking Points