• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
ER&L 2014: Never Mind I'll Just Buy: Why Users Won't Jump Through Your Hoops (Talking Points)
 

ER&L 2014: Never Mind I'll Just Buy: Why Users Won't Jump Through Your Hoops (Talking Points)

on

  • 104 views

Via an entertaining compare and contrast, the presenters explore disconnects between e-books and streaming video available via library resources compared to “real world” resources such as Netflix ...

Via an entertaining compare and contrast, the presenters explore disconnects between e-books and streaming video available via library resources compared to “real world” resources such as Netflix and Kindle e-books. The purpose is to illustrate how library resources and commercial resources aim to meet user needs in radically different ways.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
104
Views on SlideShare
102
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

https://twitter.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    ER&L 2014: Never Mind I'll Just Buy: Why Users Won't Jump Through Your Hoops (Talking Points) ER&L 2014: Never Mind I'll Just Buy: Why Users Won't Jump Through Your Hoops (Talking Points) Document Transcript

    • Never Mind, I’ll Just Buy It: Why Library Users Won’t Jump Through Your Hoops Joelle Thomas  &  Galadriel Chilton joelle.thomas@lib.uconn.edu  galadriel.chilton@lib.uconn.edu Abstract Via an entertaining compare and contrast, presenters will explore disconnects between e­books and  streaming video available via library resources compared to “real world” resources such as Netflix and Kindle  e­books. The purpose is to illustrate how library resources and commercial resources aim to meet user  needs in radically different ways. Image Talking Points Intro  #erl14nevermind  For example...  You don't need instructions, usually, but in case  you do: three steps! Anecdotes with Joelle: Options for Video! ● Response #1 Is it YouTube? ● * Response #2 ­ Pay Options?
    •  Galadriel  Galadriel  Galadriel Galadriel Here’s another example of how library access to  e­books is absurd and inflicts significant pain… Note that this video assumes that one already  has an EBSCO account. Galadriel A couple of things to highlight about this awful  experience include… That you must authorize your computer to be  able to share an EBSCO e­book amongst  multiple devices. If you skip this tiny print, the  e­book is only available one computer and going  back to authorize a machine is complicated.
    • Galadriel  And then it gets even better…. Once your e­book expires, even if you remove it  from Adobe Digital Editions, it still takes up  space on your hard drive. How does this make your feel?  Galadriel Here’s another example of complicated  instructions required due to the interfaces we  offer users. Why is this? Galadriel It results in telling our users “No” and results in  inconvenience at a most spectacular level and  utterly defies expectation. A faculty member’s response when being shown  how to use Ebrary was why is the library even  paying for stuff that is so hard to use> Joelle’s student story ● Buy it instead of e­book Galadriel  The reality is that… ...and we haven’t even mentioned the poor MARC  records provided that inhibit discovery and  access to e­books. < Joelle enter stage left >  Ok, next up... I teach ARTstor, and students do not use it, ever.  Why?
    •  Google Images...  <play video showing ArtStor access> Anecdotes with Joelle! Students do not want to  use ArtSTOR if they can possibly help it. Clicks in defiance of all expectation. Why  double­clicks? Why? :(  What do users expect vs. what we offer ­ it’s a  problem. Vendors who sell to end users work with very  different assumptions from vendors who sell to  libraries  1998 ­ 2012 From 2004 onward, consistently something with  an electronic user interface.  Yet, we not only give poor interfaces, but a hefty  user guide to go with it.  And it's not just because these commercial  products are simpler. Netflix is not a simple  product. Amazon ebooks are not simple  products. 
    • One way to reduce complexity is to reduce  choices and offer smart defaults. We seem to  prefer offering complex guidelines for navigating  an interface rather than streamlining the interface;  we put all options up front rather than creating a  useful hierarchy. We are trying to meet all needs  equally and not meeting any of them very well.  We need to know our users and their aspirations  better. Galadriel Yet people want e­books and they wouldn’t mind  getting e­books from libraries, but...  Galadriel  Galadriel Joelle  "Clayton Christiansen had a theory and he called it  disruptive innovation. What this theory states is that  disruption happens from the low end. New products  come on the marketplace and even though they’re  not better, even though they don’t work as well as  their high­end predecessors, even though they are  made of cheaper materials  and they are, pound for  pound, more expensive in a sense for what you get,  they do one thing and they do that one thing really  well. They do that one thing better than anything else  on the marketplace. They create an entirely new  market for that technology, for people who could  never have had access to it before. Because there  are so many more of these people who now have 
    • access to this technology, eventually, the technology  gets good enough, and it disrupts the market for the  higher­end products. It wipes away their larger  competitors." ­Karen McGrane tl;dr Perfect is the enemy of good, your perfect,  complex product is not going to win.  Joelle  Interview about doing business in Russia­­now  Steam's second­largest European market  Joelle  If it's convenient and cheap, people will pay for  it­­where restrictions fail, added value and being  easier than piracy prevails.  Joelle  DRM reduces value, makes buying inherently  less attractive.  Galadriel Galadriel
    • Joelle We're trying! Just not very well. So, what do we do? Here’s what we’re doing...DDA 2.0 What are you doing, what do you think we should  do?       March 18, 2014 This work is licensed by Joelle Thomas and Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution­Non Commercial­Share Alike 4.0 International License.