ER&L 2014: DDA 2.0 Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books - Talking Points
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ER&L 2014: DDA 2.0 Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books - Talking Points

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UConn Libraries PDA program is quite successful from an acquisitions perspective, but access to DRM-encased e-books is a less than ideal user experience. This presentation describes how UConn ...

UConn Libraries PDA program is quite successful from an acquisitions perspective, but access to DRM-encased e-books is a less than ideal user experience. This presentation describes how UConn Libraries worked to provide access to thousands of DRM-free e-books while only purchasing titles with highest use.

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ER&L 2014: DDA 2.0 Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books - Talking Points ER&L 2014: DDA 2.0 Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books - Talking Points Document Transcript

  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. DDA 2.0: Evidence-Based Selection of E-Books Galadriel Chilton galadriel.chilton@lib.uconn.edu Abstract UConn Libraries PDA program is quite successful from an acquisitions perspective, but access to DRM- encased e-books is a less than ideal user experience. This presentation describes how UConn Libraries is working to provide access to thousands of DRM-free e-books while only purchasing titles with highest use. Image Speaking Points Introduction Twitter hash tag Title of presentation and correction from abstract This is a work in progress Background a. Implemented PDA in July 2011 i. EBL – Profiles ii. Ebrary – Profiles b. Successful from an acquisitions perspective For example, while we have over 60,000 e-books accessible via EBL, just over 15,000 have been used, there have been 14,500 STLs, and 417 purchases triggered between July 2011 and February 2014.
  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Image Speaking Points However, there are problems and serious frustrations when it comes to… c. User Access d. Interface e. Limited simultaneous users f. Impediments to downloads g. Software required Users encounter overly-complex unintuitive interfaces. Faculty on Ebrary: why is the library buying things that are nearly impossible to use? Far more than a 3 step process to access PDA books… Let alone the ease of access users expect and experience when accessing the PDF of a journal article: one-click and go! <<Here’s what UConn faculty member Jonathan Klassen said upon receiving links to two EBLe-books he had requested. Yes, libraries can report functionality problems with e- books, but the reality is that we shouldn’t have to and it is increasingly harder to do so with % of online content increasing while staff are flat or decreasing.
  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Image Speaking Points Additionally, e-Book content is not integrated with other like content from the publisher. Which isolates information discovery much like a bug in a jar. It’s like this – we’re open for business in terms of spending money, but the door is closed and very complicated to open for uses. So why this…. When – for the amount of money spent on PDA – we should be able to capture the acquisitions benefit of PDA but make e-book access and use a pleasant, easy experience for users? a. Acquisitions Benefit 1. Title-by-title purchase 2. Purchased upon use/demand b. Striving For 1. DRM free e-journal-like access 2. Multiple simultaneous users 3. Integrated with other content With continuing flat or reduced budgets, and increased need to justify spend, we can neither afford, nor justify buying packages of e-books in order to gain access to select titles.
  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Image Speaking Points Analysis of Data EBL PDA use data showed that out of 294 publishers with use,75% of the use and spend was for books from7 publishers No. of other publishers with use: 294 Ebrary PDA use data shows that 48% of the use was for books for 7 publisher; many the same as EBL: No. of other publishers with use: 492 Meanwhile… We are simultaneously receiving requests form faculty for university press publications from Spain, Mexico, and Latin America. Had license-denial statistics for the publisher platform for some of the publishers with most used/in-demand e-book publishers. An idea… What if… We paid a small deposit to publishers with e-book content for 12 months of access to all e-books with a guaranteed spend at the end of 12 months that would be used to purchase perpetual access to e-books with the highest use based on the libraries’ analysis of COUNTER reports and the e-book prices at the start of the 12 month period? Goal: • Purchase only what is used • Purchase title-by-title instead of by package • Guaranteed spend with some publishers would be analogous to a package purchase. • Show that title-by-title purchasing is – despite the increased complexity on the ordering end –
  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Image Speaking Points a viable and needed model. • Enable reserve to purchase titles upon demand a. Approached Publishers Taylor & Francis SAGE Elsevier Cambridge Springer Wiley b. Publishers’ Response - SAGE began creating a similar model - Taylor & Francis - Since working with publishers Must calculate for: Already-purchased DDA titles a. Must decide whether to purchase again or seek discount. b. Once active, remove titles from DDA profiles Downside a. Give then take away access to users b. But, gain evidence to inform budget allocations for following year c. And to request funding increases Balance between PDA model and package purchases. Due to great response and conversations with publishers, it looked like things were going to take off, Started working with Digitalia and Springer. Not necessarily highest used publishers… Springer is and Springer’s DRM-free, download whole e- books, and ILL-friendly licenses meet expectations. Began talking about a pilot that would facilitate some title-by-title purchases. Digitalia is also DRM free and provides access to world-
  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Image Speaking Points wide university press e-books and would help fulfill the need for Spanish-language scholarly content. Then there were woes… 1. Time, initial budget 2. Budget cuts, and Licensing woes… Licenses for two DDA 2.0 pilots have been in the CT AG’s office since August. Instead of just a flat tire, it’s as if the whole wheel of momentum has been removed. Working to construct new models of acquiring content with… Oxford Wiley – in process Gale – Archives Unbound primary source documents rather than e-books Multi-Science Publishing, limited in scope/highly specialized journal articles Access to all journals, we pay $5 per download. Continuing to hope to be able to license the pilots with Digitalia.
  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Image Speaking Points We can merge models of e-book acquisition and access to… ..unlock access… …and make e-book access lovely, easy… … elegant, and fast. Give users the ability to easily discovery and access e- books within the context of related content. But right now? We have work to do. Conclusion 1. Libraries need to ask for acquisitions models that work… a. For users b. In the age of data-informed/driven decisions c. For library budgets d. For DRM-free and ILL-friendly e-books 2. Time consuming, can feel like no progress, so celebrate little changes a. Oxford title by title b. Gale Archives Unbound 3. Then keep asking for the ideal
  • March 17, 2014 This work is licensed by Galadriel Chilton under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Image Speaking Points Recommendations a. Look at licensing turn aways b. Log faculty requests c. If you have a PDA program, looking at spend/use by publisher d. Use data to put together a need-based proposal for publishers iii. Create your own package that excludes titles bought via PDA or discounts them if you want to purchase DRM-free version iv. Propose an evidence-based acquisitions pilot Access fee up front Guaranteed spend a. Estimate based on license denial stats b. Quantitative proof of need from faculty, curriculum, etc. Thank you!