Don Tapscott at Net Change Week 2010

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  • Or how not a single TV station managed to capitalize on what YouTube is starting to firmly grab a hold of? Not a SINGLE ONE? Many things seem obvious in hindsight… but I bet a lot of companies never saw this coming. Why not? And how can your company be different as the Web and Enterprise 2.0 continue to grow in influence?
  • Or how not a single TV station managed to capitalize on what YouTube is starting to firmly grab a hold of? Not a SINGLE ONE? Many things seem obvious in hindsight… but I bet a lot of companies never saw this coming. Why not? And how can your company be different as the Web and Enterprise 2.0 continue to grow in influence?
  • Or how not a single TV station managed to capitalize on what YouTube is starting to firmly grab a hold of? Not a SINGLE ONE? Many things seem obvious in hindsight… but I bet a lot of companies never saw this coming. Why not? And how can your company be different as the Web and Enterprise 2.0 continue to grow in influence?
  • Or how not a single TV station managed to capitalize on what YouTube is starting to firmly grab a hold of? Not a SINGLE ONE? Many things seem obvious in hindsight… but I bet a lot of companies never saw this coming. Why not? And how can your company be different as the Web and Enterprise 2.0 continue to grow in influence?
  • Or how not a single TV station managed to capitalize on what YouTube is starting to firmly grab a hold of? Not a SINGLE ONE? Many things seem obvious in hindsight… but I bet a lot of companies never saw this coming. Why not? And how can your company be different as the Web and Enterprise 2.0 continue to grow in influence?
  • Or how not a single TV station managed to capitalize on what YouTube is starting to firmly grab a hold of? Not a SINGLE ONE? Many things seem obvious in hindsight… but I bet a lot of companies never saw this coming. Why not? And how can your company be different as the Web and Enterprise 2.0 continue to grow in influence?
  • Patent Strategies for Promoting Open Innovation Nike and Creative Commons are calling upon other companies and stakeholders to bring the network efficiencies of open innovation to solving the problems of sustainability. GreenXchange will seek to bring together stakeholders in working groups to discuss strategies for advancing the commons by exploring ideas such as using patent pools, research non-assertions, and using technologies that support networked and community-based knowledge transfer and sharing. Networks work best with a standardized and simple set of protocols. The Internet is one example of a network based on the TCP/IP Protocol. The Creative Commons community is a network based on users of Creative Commons licenses who share content under these standard transfer regimes. For the proposed network of sustainability innovation, the core protocols relate to the freedom to experiment and conduct research, the standardization of transfer of ideas, and the use of technology to monitor and quantify downstream impact. Building a Better Innovation Ecosystem Nike and Creative Commons share a vision of creating an open innovation platform that promotes the creation and adoption of technologies that have the potential to solve important global or industry-wide challenges. Open innovation is characterized by leveraging knowledge shared across many participants in a market, including companies, individuals, suppliers, distributors, academia, and many others to solve common problems and to assist internal innovation. Open innovation is an investment in the capacity of the market to support a firm’s ability to innovate and implement revolutionary technologies. It enables the development of new business models that leverage the creative output made possible by open collaboration to create new value and products. Open innovation is also a key component of engaging the resources and capabilities of large communities in finding ways to create sustainability, such as developing new ways to promote efficient resource use, implementing green manufacturing techniques, and delivery of products to consumers with lower impact to the environment. Traditional collaboration is face-to-face. However, increasingly, modern collaboration, powered by the Web, is distributed. Examples of distributed collaboration include the Google search, the Wikipedia article, and the eBay auction, all which bring together disparate and distributed sources of information into a collaborative network mediated by common rules. Network mediated collaboration is based on small transactions, built upon standard technical and policy platforms, that enable low transaction costs both at a technical and legal level. By doing so, network mediated collaboration has a democratizing impact and therefore can engage mass audiences of users, contributors, and mediators, in ways that would otherwise be impossible. Likewise, open innovation is based on the mediated network collaboration concept: by making it easier to share documents, music, software, data, ideas, discoveries, and other kinds of knowledge, it has the potential to engage mass communities in the creative process. That brings with it innovation potential that not single company can match throw internally funded R&D.
  • But there’s another reality developing that we all have to face. This map shows the world, “as it is”, according to land area.
  • • China’s economy is projected to grow to around 94-143% of the size of the US economy by 2050, depending on whether it is measured at market exchange rates or PPPs (although the difference between these two measures is projected to be much less in proportional terms by 2050 due to the expected rise in China’s real exchange rate versus the dollar); • India’s economy is projected to grow to between 58% and 100% of the size of the US economy over this period; this would make India clearly the third largest economy in the world in 2050 when measured at market exchange rates (or equal second behind China when measured at PPP rates); and • the economies of Mexico, Brazil, Russia, Turkey and Indonesia are projected to grow from only around 2-6% of the size of the US economy at market exchange rates today to around 10-20% by 2050 (and 25% in the case of Brazil at PPP rates), although they are likely to remain significantly smaller than those of either China or India due to their much smaller populations. In contrast, most established OECD economies, with the exception of Canada and Australia, are projected to lose some ground relative to the US economy by 2050 due to their slower population growth. As a result: • by 2050, the Japanese economy is projected to be of comparable size to those of Brazil and Indonesia, having been overtaken much earlier by China and India; • the German, UK and French economies are projected by 2050 to be somewhat smaller than the Mexican economy and similar in size to the Russian economy; and • the Italian economy is projected to be of similar size to the Turkish economy by 2050.
  • From Ushahidi: Ushahidi, which means "testimony" in Swahili, is a website that was initially developed to map reports of violence in Kenya after the post-election fallout at the beginning of 2008. Ushahidi's roots are in the collaboration of Kenyan citizen journalists during a time of crisis. The website was used to map incidents of violence and peace efforts throughout the country based on reports submitted via the web and mobile phone. This initial deployment of Ushahidi had 45,000 users in Kenya, and was the catalyst for us realizing there was a need for a platform based on it, which could be use by others around the world. Since then we have grown from an ad hoc group of volunteers to a focused organization. The team is comprised of individuals with a wide span of experience ranging from human rights work to software development. We have also built a strong team of volunteer developers in primarily in Africa, but also Europe and the U.S. As early as May of 2008, we shared our code with a group in South Africa that used it to map incidents of xenophobic violence. This rudimentary deployment made us realize the need to rebuild the framework from the ground up. By August seed funding from Humanity United in the amount of $200,000 allowed the team to get started rebuilding the platform. In October the alpha version of Ushahidi was completed and promptly deployed to the DR Congo for testing. In its alpha form, Ushahidi was tested and deployed with 11 different organizations directly, including the International Center for Transitional Justice (ICTJ), Peace Heroes and the Kenyan National Commission on Human Rights. Externally, there were 4 major alpha deployments, including Al Jazeera during the War on Gaza, Vote Report India (to monitor the recent local elections) and Pak Voices (to map incidents of violence in Pakistan). Our goal is to create a platform that any person or organization can use to set up their own way to collect and visualize information. The core platform will allow for plug-in and extensions so that it can be customized for different locales and needs. The beta version platform is now available as an open source application that others can download for free, implement and use to bring awareness to crisis situations or other events in their own locales, it is also continually being improved tested with various partners primarily in Kenya. Organizations can also use the tool for internal monitoring or visualization purposes. We are now focusing on scaling the organization in order to make the tool as widely accessible as possible, to increase the platform’s user-friendliness, and to help support the community that has grown around Ushahidi.
  • Kiva's mission is to connect people, through lending, for the sake of alleviating poverty. Kiva empowers individuals to lend to an entrepreneur across the globe. By combining microfinance with the internet, Kiva is creating a global community of people connected through lending. Kiva was born of the following beliefs: People are by nature generous, and will help others if given the opportunity to do so in a transparent, accountable way. The poor are highly motivated and can be very successful when given an opportunity. By connecting people we can create relationships beyond financial transactions, and build a global community expressing support and encouragement of one another. Kiva promotes: Dignity: Kiva encourages partnership relationships as opposed to benefactor relationships. Partnership relationships are characterized by mutual dignity and respect. Accountability: Loans encourage more accountability than donations where repayment is not expected. Transparency: The Kiva website is an open platform where communication can flow freely around the world. As of November 2009, Kiva has facilitated over $100 million in loans.
  • PatientsLikeMe is a social networking health site that enables its members to share treatment and symptom information in order to track and to learn from real-world outcomes. PatientsLikeMe currently has communities for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease, fibromyalgia, HIV, chronic fatigue syndrome, and mood disorders, as well as the rare conditions progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, and Devic's disease (neuromyelitis optica). In June 2009 PatientsLikeMe announced their first major partnership with the drug company UCB to develop a community for patients suffering from epilepsy, due for launch in early 2010.[1] PatientsLikeMe enables patients who suffer from these life-changing diseases to converse with one another, allowing them to share data on improving their outcomes, empathize with each other and to learn any techniques or medication other sufferers are trying in order to improve their health. The site was initially launched in 2005 when brothers James Heywood and Benjamin Heywood recognized the need for community-based information sharing around specific diseases when their brother Stephen Heywood was diagnosed with ALS in 1998. Physicians and researchers can access the site, enabling them to find out what treatments its patients have tried and how successful the outcome of the treatments were. The site has also introduced a number of projects that analyze clinical information given by the patients. Users of the site access the site for free. However the site is a commercial site as it aims to sell its users' data to drug and medical companies. The number of users is increasing. At October 2009, there were 45,000 registered patients on the site. In the time since launch, the company has expanded to 9 disease categories, with plans to expand to many more. The company was named as one of the "15 Companies that Will Change the World" by Business 2.0 and CNN Money.[2] It was also featured in a March, 2008 New York Time Magazine article entitled "Practicing Patients"[3] and in December 2008 on a television segment with Sanjay Gupta for the CBS Evening News.[4]
  • Spotify is a proprietary peer-to-peer music streaming service with desktop applications available for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X; the Windows version can also be used under Linux with Wine. Developed by Swedish startup "Spotify AB", the software allows unlimited streaming of selected music from a multitude of major and independent record labels including Sony, EMI, Warner Music Group and Universal with virtually no buffering delay.[1][2] Music can also be imported from either iTunes[3] or directly from local files.[4] An ad-supported version of the software is free to download in Sweden, Spain, Norway, Finland, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.[5][6]; for a monthly fee, users can upgrade to a "Premium" account, which offers higher bitrate streams, offline access to music and use of Spotify on mobile devices running iPhone OS, Android or Symbian.[7] Currently only consumers with a credit cards issued in one of the launch countries can activate a Premium account. A "Day Pass" was available, which gave unlimited advert-free listening for 24 hours; this option was removed when Spotify "Unlimited" was introduced in May 2010. Music can be browsed by artist, album, record label or playlist as well as by direct searches, and a link allows the listener to purchase selected material via partner retailers.[8] Launched in October 2008, Spotify has approximately seven million users as of May 19th, 2010; about 250,000 of these are paying members.[9]
  • Alan Leave you with a closing thought. What we’d like to do here is not only present a view of some of the things that are happening, but also be part of the change that’s occurring. That’s an opportunity to take leadership on these issues, but some very real challenges in doing so.
  • Don Tapscott at Net Change Week 2010

    1. 1. MACROWIKINOMICS: Rebooting Business and the World Don Tapscott, Chairman, nGenera Insight [email_address] twitter.com/dtapscott www.dontapscott.com June 11, 2010
    2. 2. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    3. 3. The Rise of the Age of Networked Intelligence Printing Press Internet | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Agrarian Age Industrial Age Age of Networked Intelligence
    4. 4. Current Crisis | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    5. 5. A Burning Platform for Change | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    6. 6. A Turning Point in History: Rebooting Our Institutions | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    7. 7. 5 Principles for Innovation, Wealth, and Sustainability | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    8. 8. vs. Source: Compete.com | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: The Rise of Collaborative Communities
    9. 9. vs. Source: Compete.com | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: The Rise of Collaborative Communities
    10. 10. vs. Source: Compete.com | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: The Rise of Collaborative Communities
    11. 11. vs. Source: Compete.com | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: The Rise of Collaborative Communities
    12. 12. vs. Source: Compete.com | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: The Rise of Collaborative Communities
    13. 13. vs. Source: Compete.com | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: The Rise of Collaborative Communities
    14. 14. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: Alex Tapscott’s Wikinomicists Community
    15. 15. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: New Models of Citizen Engagement – Wikinomics & Obama
    16. 16. Collaboration: Rethinking Institutional Models <ul><li>20 th Century Models </li></ul><ul><li>Command and control </li></ul><ul><li>Vertically integrated </li></ul><ul><li>Non-porous </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of Content </li></ul> | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. <ul><li>21 st Century Networks </li></ul><ul><li>Embraces Peering </li></ul><ul><li>Focused on core </li></ul><ul><li>Business Web </li></ul><ul><li>Context, agency, curation </li></ul>
    17. 17. Value Creation Critical Resources Physical Financial Knowledge Self- Organization Traditional Hierarchy | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Collaboration: From Mass Production to Mass Collaboration Extended Enterprise Industrial Age Corporation Mass Collaboration Business Webs
    18. 18. Collaboration: Connecting with Communities Ideas attract passionate cohorts With zero networking costs, global reach increases diversity Diversity leads to better innovations and solutions Attracting later adopters Creating more network effects Leading indicators: viral growth, innovation savings Enterprise joins community Lowered R&D costs B-web growth drives visibility and demand Gains B-Web influence, climbs learning curve in project Leading enterprise to make additional investments Rapid innovation cycles Lagging indicators: Revenue, loyalty, market leadership Initiator starts project Creating network effects | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Engaged Enterprise Self-Organizing Community
    19. 19. Collaboration: The Seven Wikinomics Business Models for Mass Collaboration <ul><li>Peer Pioneers </li></ul><ul><li>Ideagoras </li></ul><ul><li>Prosumers </li></ul><ul><li>New Alexandrians </li></ul><ul><li>Platforms for Participation </li></ul><ul><li>The Global Plant Floor </li></ul><ul><li>The Wiki Workplace </li></ul> | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    20. 20. Openness: Transparency as a New Force | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    21. 21. Openness: The Long Road to Transparency | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    22. 22. Openness: 5 Classes of Shareholders | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Employees Communities Partners Customers Shareholders
    23. 23. Sharing: Have a Portfolio of IP, Some Shared, Some Not | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    24. 24. Sharing IP for Success and Sustainability – GreenXchange | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    25. 25. Interdependence | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    26. 26. Interdependence: World Map According to Surface Area Source: Worldmapper | © 2009 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    27. 27. Interdependence: World Map According to Population Ages 15 - 30: 2010 Source: Worldmapper | © 2009 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    28. 28. | © 2010 nGenera Corp. All Rights Reserved. Source: PricewaterhouseCoopers estimates (rounded to nearest percentage point) Projected relative size of economies in 2005 and 2050 (US = 100) Interdependence: GDP in PPP Terms
    29. 29. | © 2010 nGenera Corp. All Rights Reserved. Interdependence: The Rise of Asia
    30. 30. Interdependence: The Four Pillars of Society | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    31. 31. Interdependence: Our Biosphere | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    32. 32. Integrity: Three Values | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. Honesty Consideration Accountability
    33. 33. Integrity: What Not to Do… | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    34. 34. Integrity: Baking it into Corporate DNA | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    35. 35. Summary: 5 Principles for the Age of Networked Intelligence | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    36. 36. A Turning Point in History: Rebooting Our Institutions | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    37. 37. A Turning Point in History: Rebooting Our Institutions | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    38. 38. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. OLD:
    39. 39. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Platforms for Learning & Action
    40. 40. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Crowdsourcing Crisis Information
    41. 41. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Loans that Save Lives
    42. 42. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: WEF’s Global Redesign Initiative
    43. 43. A Turning Point in History: Rebooting Our Institutions | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    44. 44. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. OLD:
    45. 45. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Relinquishing Privacy in Order to Retrieve Data
    46. 46. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Introducing Collaborative Healthcare <ul><li>Health Care Communities </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone Gets a Personal Health Care Page </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration Generates Massive Data for Medicine </li></ul><ul><li>The New Engagement of Medical Professionals </li></ul>
    47. 47. A Turning Point in History: Rebooting Our Institutions | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    48. 48. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. OLD: Outdated Physical Media and an Accompanying Industry Model
    49. 49. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Unlimited Streaming Music with Spotify
    50. 50. A Turning Point in History: Rebooting Our Institutions | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    51. 51. OLD: Smear Campaigns and Marketing | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    52. 52. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Models of Citizen Engagement
    53. 53. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Models of Citizen Engagement
    54. 54. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved. NEW: Models of Citizen Engagement
    55. 55. A Turning Point in History: Rebooting Our Institutions | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    56. 56. The Age of Networked Intelligence | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    57. 57. Crisis of Leadership Paradigm shifts involve dislocation, conflict, confusion, uncertainty. New paradigms are nearly always received with coolness, even mockery or hostility . Those with vested interests fight the change. The shift demands such a different view of things that established leaders are often last to be won over, if at all . | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    58. 58. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    59. 59. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    60. 60. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    61. 61. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    62. 62. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    63. 63. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    64. 64. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    65. 65. A True Leader for Institutional Model Innovation | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    66. 66. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    67. 67. A Time of Volatility or Worse | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    68. 68. “ Live Fire Zone”: Bangkok, Thailand | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    69. 69. Protests in Japan | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    70. 70. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    71. 71. | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.
    72. 72. Don Tapscott [email_address] Twitter: @dtapscott (416) 863-8801 www.dontapscott.com www.ngenera.com | © 2010 nGenera. All Rights Reserved.

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