Stoichiometric Calculations
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Stoichiometric Calculations

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Stoichiometric Calculations Stoichiometric Calculations Presentation Transcript

  • Stoichiometric Calculations
    The coefficients in the balanced equation give the ratio of moles of reactants and products
  • Stoichiometric Calculations
    From the mass of Substance A you can use the ratio of the coefficients of A and B to calculate the mass of Substance B formed (if it’s a product) or used (if it’s a reactant)
  • Stoichiometric Calculations
    C6H12O6 + 6 O2 6 CO2 + 6 H2O
    Starting with 1.00 g of C6H12O6…
    we calculate the moles of C6H12O6…
    use the coefficients to find the moles of H2O…
    and then turn the moles of water to grams
  • Sample #1
    CH4 +2O22H2O + CO2
    How many moles of CH4 are needed to make 13 moles of water?
  • Sample #2
    CH4 +2O22H2O + CO2
    How many moles of water are made from 10g of Oxygen?
  • Sample #3
    CH4 +2O22H2O + CO2
    How many grams of water are produced from 100 moles of CH4?
  • Sample #4
    CH4 +2O22H2O + CO2
    How many grams of Oxygen are needed in order to produce 200 g of carbon dioxide?
  • Limiting Reactants
    The limiting reactant is the reactant present in the smallest stoichiometric amount
  • Limiting Reactants
    The limiting reactant is the reactant present in the smallest stoichiometric amount
    In other words, it’s the reactant you’ll run out of first (in this case, the H2)
  • Limiting Reactants
    In the example below, the O2 would be the excess reagent
  • Theoretical Yield
    The theoretical yield is the amount of product that can be made
    In other words it’s the amount of product possible as calculated through the stoichiometry problem
    This is different from the actual yield, the amount one actually produces and measures
  • Percent Yield
    Actual Yield
    Theoretical Yield
    Percent Yield = x 100
    A comparison of the amount actually obtained to the amount it was possible to make