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Ideal Gas Equation

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  • 1. Boyle’s law: V a (at constant n and T)
    Va
    nT
    nT
    nT
    P
    P
    P
    V = constant x = R
    1
    P
    Ideal Gas Equation
    Charles’ law: VaT(at constant n and P)
    Avogadro’s law: V a n(at constant P and T)
    R is the gas constant
    PV = nRT
  • 2. The Universal Gas Constant
    The conditions 0 0C and 1 atm are called standard temperature and pressure (STP).
    Experiments show that at STP, 1 mole of an ideal gas occupies 22.414 L.
    PV = nRT
    R = PV/nT
    At STP R = (1 atm)(22.414L)
    (1 mol)(273.15 K)
    R = 0.082057 L•atm mol • K
  • 3. 1 mol HCl
    V =
    n = 49.8 g x
    = 1.37 mol
    36.45 g HCl
    1.37 mol x 0.0821 x 273.15 K
    V =
    1 atm
    nRT
    L•atm
    P
    mol•K
    What is the volume (in liters) occupied by 49.8 g of HCl at STP?
    T = 0 0C = 273.15 K
    P = 1 atm
    PV = nRT
    V = 30.6 L
  • 4. m
    V
    PM
    =
    RT
    dRT
    P
    Density (d) Calculations
    m is the mass of the gas in g
    d =
    M is the molar mass of the gas
    Molar Mass (M ) of a Gaseous Substance
    d is the density of the gas in g/L
    M =
  • 5. What is the volume of CO2 produced at 370 C and 1.00 atm when 5.60 g of glucose are used up in the reaction:
    C6H12O6 (s) + 6O2 (g) 6CO2 (g) + 6H2O (l)
    6 mol CO2
    g C6H12O6 mol C6H12O6 mol CO2V CO2
    x
    1 mol C6H12O6
    1 mol C6H12O6
    x
    180 g C6H12O6
    L•atm
    mol•K
    nRT
    0.187 mol x 0.0821 x 310.15 K
    =
    P
    1.00 atm
    Gas Stoichiometry
    5.60 g C6H12O6
    = 0.187 mol CO2
    V =
    = 4.76 L