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CoP11 Conference on Biodiversity Sustainability Report

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From 1-19 October 2012 MCI organised the Eleventh Conference of the Parties (COP11) on the Convention on Biological Diversity. Celebrated in Hyderabad and hosted by the Indian Ministry of the …

From 1-19 October 2012 MCI organised the Eleventh Conference of the Parties (COP11) on the Convention on Biological Diversity. Celebrated in Hyderabad and hosted by the Indian Ministry of the Environment and Forests, the event drew over 11,500 participants and featured over 900 sessions.
Key results of the sustainable event programme included:
• 91% of waste diverted from landfill
• 90% of catering sourced locally in India
• 493,600 250ml bottles of water saved
• 1791 gifts donated to children in need
• Over 80 NGO’s engaged with event

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  • 1. EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT
  • 2. TABLE OF CONTENTSIntroduction .................................................................................................................................. 4 Event Background ......................................................................................................................... 4Organisation .................................................................................................................................. 8Sustainability Approach.................................................................................................................... 10 Commitment to Sustainability ......................................................................................................... 10 Sustainability Issues ..................................................................................................................... 10 Sustainability Objectives ............................................................................................................... 11 Sustainable Event Management Activities ............................................................................................ 11Event Impacts ............................................................................................................................... 12Sustainability Performance ............................................................................................................... 15 Event Footprint .......................................................................................................................... 15 Event Audit System ...................................................................................................................... 16 Sustainable Event Management Process Performance .............................................................................. 16 Audited Event Sustainability Benchmarking Using MeetGreenTM Calculator .................................................... 18 Waste Generation Breakdown.......................................................................................................... 19Strengths and Weaknesses ................................................................................................................ 21Strengths, Opportunities and Innovations .............................................................................................. 24Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 1© MCI
  • 3. Catering Responsibility.................................................................................................................. 24 Responsible Procurement ............................................................................................................... 25 Managing Exhibitions .................................................................................................................... 28 Stimulating Social and Sustainable Experience – The Biodiversity Haat ......................................................... 29 Community Outreach Donation ........................................................................................................ 32 Leaving a Positive Legacy in Andhra Pradesh ........................................................................................ 34Waste Management Approach ............................................................................................................ 36 Summary of Waste Diversion and Recycling ......................................................................................... 38Increasing Sustainability Performance .................................................................................................. 39 1. Build Engagement Early ............................................................................................................ 39 2. Carbon Responsibility............................................................................................................... 39 3. Scale up Social....................................................................................................................... 40 4. Structuring Sustainability .......................................................................................................... 40 5. Take Bold Steps ..................................................................................................................... 40 6. Amplify Communication ............................................................................................................ 41Conclusion ................................................................................................................................... 42Credits ....................................................................................................................................... 43 Authors and Contributors ............................................................................................................... 43Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 2© MCI
  • 4. About MCI Sustainability Services ..................................................................................................... 44 Contact .................................................................................................................................... 44 Photo Credits ............................................................................................................................. 44Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 3© MCI
  • 5. INTRODUCTIONThe principles of the United Nations, the Ministry of the Environment and Forests India and the ethos of the XI Conferenceof Parties (CoP) Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) command that a responsible approach be taken to organising alarge event such as COP11, the leading global gathering of policy makers and stakeholders in the planet’s biodiversity.Working collaboratively all bodies were committed to promoting environmental, fiscal and social responsibility and eventpartner MCI was committed to leading by example and demonstrating ethical and sustainable operating practices. As aresult, the organisers aimed to minimize the environmental impacts of the COP 11 Convention on Biological Diversity byorganising as responsible and sustainable event as possible given the short lead time in preparation and unprecedentedscale.This summary report prepared by MCI provides a sustainability assessment of the event. It details a perspective of theenvironmental footprint of the event, analysis of the event management system and process concerning sustainable eventpractices. Recommendations are provided to increase sustainable performance of future events.EVENT BACKGROUNDHosted by the Ministry of the Environment and Forests India, in cooperation with the Secretariat of the Convention onBiological Diversity (SCBD) in Montréal and the United Nations Environment Programme, the XI Conference of PartiesConvention on Biological Diversity (8-19 October 2012) was organised to support and promote biodiversity and the AichiBiodiversity Targets. As a platform for collaboration its goal is to mainstream biodiversity at different levels. Throughoutthe United Nations Decade on Biodiversity, governments around the world have been encouraged to develop, implementand communicate the results of national strategies for implementation of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity. With morethan 11,500 participants in attendance, the convention featured over 900 sessions focused on elements of the StrategicPlan including: Marine & Coastal Biodiversity, Climate Change & Biodiversity, Development & Biodiversity and BiodiversitySustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 4© MCI
  • 6. of dry and sub-humid lands, Forests, Inland waters, Agricultural biodiversity, Sustainable use of biodiversity, PlantConservation, Biofuels and Invasive alien species.The resounding commitment from the XI Conference of Parties Convention on Biological Diversity was that countries agreedto double resources for biodiversity protection by 2015; developed countries agreed to double funding to support effortsin developing states towards meeting the internationally-agreed biodiversity targets, and the main goals of the StrategicPlan for Biodiversity 2011-2020.Developed countries agreed to double funding to support efforts in developing states towards meeting the internationally-agreed Biodiversity Targets, and the main goals of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020.See www.cbd.int/cop11 or www.cbdcop11india.in for more information on the event.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 5© MCI
  • 7. 11,638 delegates attended the ground breaking event from over 173 countries.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 6© MCI
  • 8. Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 7© MCI
  • 9. ORGANISATIONThe event was organised by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD), based in Montréal, Canada,with the support of the host government - the Ministry of the Environment and Forests, Government of India and theassistance of the professional conference organisers – MCI Management India. The event was held at HyderabadInternational Convention Centre (HICC) and HITEX Exhibition Centre, Hyderabad, India. Creative production andtechnical services at the conference were provided by Dorier Perfectus Asia. Several other local suppliers provided theirservicers for audio-visuals, signage, printing, catering, transportation, etc.Sustainability advisory was provided by MCI Sustainability Services.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 8© MCI
  • 10. “Biodiversity sustains our food supply, is a source of medicines and supports the provision of clean air and fresh water while also contributing to economic development, cultural and spiritual enlightenment.” CBD.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 9© MCI
  • 11. SUSTAINABILITY APPROACHCOMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABILITYThe convention aimed to be a “leading sustainableevent for India, leaving long term positive social andenvironmental legacies in Andhra Pradesh.”SUSTAINABILITY ISSUESThe conference organising team identified thefollowing key sustainability issues and risks whenplanning:  Low levels of awareness by suppliers of event sustainability issues and wider communities of Andhra Pradesh;  Waste created by official documents and hand- outs, delegate communication and exhibition;  Low level of maturity of the hotels sustainability processes (waste, energy & measurement);  Unreliable energy supply (in India energy spikes and brown-outs are very common);  Lack of availability and price of organic produce.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 10© MCI
  • 12. SUSTAINABILITY OBJECTIVESThe following overall sustainability objectives were set to lessen the environmental impact of the event: Objective Status Understand and benchmark sustainability performance of event Achieved “A leading sustainable event for Divert 80% of waste away from landfill Achieved India, leaving long term positive social and environmental Use 90% local (India) catering at event venue Achieved legacies in Andhra Pradesh” Offset water and event carbon emissions Not reached Organisers Raise awareness and educate participants Achieved Engage Community, youth & tribal groups in event AchievedSUSTAINABLE EVENT MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIESSustainability concerns were addressed through all phases of event design and execution, including the following activities:  Strategic Planning: The planning team leaders met to identify a strategy for the sustainable performance of the event and created customized targets.  Supplier Engagement: Through a two hour educational event and a series of interviews, 50 entities were educated about the objectives of the event; key suppliers were questioned about sustainable practices and offered coaching and recommendations for improved results. In particular, the MCI team worked with HICC, waste management company and caterers to improve waste management, catering and sustainability measurement processes.  Sustainable Procurement: The event management team and the Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India made a series of conscious decisions in the purchasing of material and services. This includes congress bags, stage set, exhibition construction, USB sticks, printing, catering, communications as well as the selection of logistics teams that reduced transport requirements.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 11© MCI
  • 13. EVENT IMPACTS IMPACTS KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR VALUE ECONOMIC Investment in Event Total expenditures to improve event sustainability and offset emissions Over INR 10 Million Sustainability Investment in Biodiversity Park, Pylon and Museum INR 1 Billion / USD 18,264,858 Participation Number of Official delegates (MOP6 + COP11) 11,683 SOCIAL Stakeholder Key supplies being evaluated for sustainability No cost Engagement Number of Social Enterprises & NGOs in attendance at event 80+ Health and quality Space designated smoke free in venue No cost of air Labour Rights Employees covered by collective bargaining agreements broken down by No cost region/country. ENVIRONMENTAL GHG emissions Total Carbon footprint (tonnes CO2 equivalents) 8634 mt CO2e Flight Emissions (tonnes CO2) 4966 mt CO2e Local transport emissions (tonnes CO2) 688 mt CO2e Venue based emissions (Generators & electricity) 1956 mt CO2eSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 12© MCI
  • 14. IMPACTS KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR VALUE Food and paper emissions (excluding concession stands) 244 mt CO2e Average Emissions per delegate 0.75 mt CO2e Energy Total electricity consumed (Wh) 730,840 KWH UNITS Total diesel consumed on official transport (l) 12,0000 Total diesel consumed on diesel generators (l) 323,190 L Total gas consumed (m³) 0 Renewable energy certificates procured to offset electricity 0 Water Total water used (m³) 11,134 KL Paper and Sheets of paper used for printing 1,220,000 materials usage 100% recycled paper Delegate handbooks (46 pages, A5) 15,000 Carpet landfilled through event 0 Waste management Total waste from event (tonnes) excluding food 24.55 tonnes Total recycling captured from event including food (total Kg) 17.7. tonnes Paper (kg) 9,924 Glass (kg) 991 Metal (kg) 595 Plastic (kg) 4,621 Organic (food) waste 8,424 Waste Diversion from landfill 91%Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 13© MCI
  • 15. IMPACTS KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR VALUE Food Number meals produced 64,438 Percentage local (India) food sourced for meals 90% Percentage organic food sourced for meals 2% Estimated number of 250 ml plastic bottles not served due to bulk 493,600 water dispenserSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 14© MCI
  • 16. SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE CoP11 to CBD (tCO2e) Food andEVENT FOOTPRINT Paper 2.83%The Event produced a measurable total of 8634 metric tonsof Carbon dioxide, or an average of 0.75 tonnes of CO 2 perparticipant. This is equivalent to the average yearly emissions Venue 22.65%of over 8000 Indians or 435 US citizens.As expected, the biggest CO2 emissions impact derived fromair transport due to the international nature of the event, thevenue provides the second largest source due to the overalllength of the event compared to others of a comparable size.Emissions created in the production and transportation of the AirExhibitor Stands were not included in the report nor from the Hotel 57.52% 9.04%concession food stalls, though all official onsite cateringfunction figures are included. Local car and bus 7.96% Air Local car and bus Hotel Venue Food and Paper Fig 1. CO2 emission sourcesSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 15© MCI
  • 17. EVENT AUDIT SYSTEMMeetGreenSM was used as the system to evaluate the performance of the event management system.MeetGreenSM employs the philosophy of continuous improvement that challenges organizations to work to maintain andimprove their environmental and social performance.MeetGreenSM aligns with the APEX-ASTM Environmentally Sustainable Meeting standards, and evaluates over 150 eventcriteria in nine separate categories to provide advice on how to increase the sustainability and business results of an event.SUSTAINABLE EVENT MANAGEMENT PROCESS PERFORMANCEUsing the MeetGreen system, the UNCBD earned a total average score of 47% of a possible maximum of 100%. Forbenchmarking purposes, the following chart compares the sustainability practices of the Forum against the UN GlobalCompact Leaders Summit and the many other events in the MeetGreen system. As can be seen the UNCSF score is justabove average, and demonstrates the results of the event team’s commitment to improving processes and working withsuppliers to increase event sustainability.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 16© MCI
  • 18. 24 sets of 5 bins each with clearcolour coding, recognisable symbolsand descriptions in the 6 Official UNlanguages were strategically placedaround the venue, supported by astaff of 30 people focused on wastemanagement.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 17© MCI
  • 19. AUDITED EVENT SUSTAINABILITY BENCHMARKING USING MEETGREENTM CALCULATOR Average Audited Event 45% Biodiversity COP 11 47% European Ecological Federation 2011 54% Climate Change COP 15 69% UN Global Compact Leaders Forum, New 74% York Rio+20 Corporate Sustainability Forum 60% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 18© MCI
  • 20. WASTE GENERATION BREAKDOWN 4% 2% 19% Plastic Food Paper/cloth 41% Metal 34% GlassSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 19© MCI
  • 21. In order to better understand sustainable event management performance, the next chart looks at the different MeetGreencategories:Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 20© MCI
  • 22. STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES AREA KEY STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES Poor public transport offering. Choosing a destination of this type allows for Destination Low levels of sustainable event management strong education and economic multiplier benefit experience within local supply chain. Management of Novotel were very committed to Headquarters Hotel had previous experience demonstrating best practice and promoting Planet providing event measurement data. However 21 Initiative satellite hotels had no experience and in some Hotel operated towel & sheet reuse cards, Accommodation cases no understanding of wider sustainability provided information booklet as part of customer practice. engagement and communication programme, More engagement of 18 other official hotels constructed 2 sculptures of recycled material and required and off site hotel recycling required. eco-friendly staff uniforms Excellent partner in waste management - Ramky A number of initiatives were not Meeting Venue provided 24 sets of 5 bins each with clear marking implementable due to late planning. in 6 UN languages and staff of 30 people at venue. Venue and main hotel were in the same complex, Distance from airport and lack of public which significantly reduced the need for transfers. transport required most delegates to use Transportation Shuttles were provided for LDC ministers instead taxis. of the individual carsSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 21© MCI
  • 23. AREA KEY STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES Low availability and high cost of organic products, and lack of supplier awareness of 90% of food was sourced within India. sustainability. Delegates were encouraged to use reusable water Leftover food was unable to be donated to bottles and dispensers, resulting in an estimated wet/oil mix and distance of distributors from Food and 493,600 plastic water bottles being avoided. venue and liability issues. Beverage Plates in the food court were made of Areca palm Water pitchers were not used for Higher accompanied by wooden cutlery. The paper cups Level Segment due to image concerns used at the water dispensers were biodegradable. Single sachets of sugar were unable to be Menus printed on Recycled paper eliminated due to rainy season & high humidity All shell schemes were hired and modular. Flex Solar powered lighting for external signage signage was donated to shanty town inhabitants Exhibition too costly. and stands and staging featured bamboo UNEP guidelines provided as guidance rather constructions. than policy. UNEP Exhibitor guidelines integrated into manualSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 22© MCI
  • 24. AREA KEY STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES 15,000 delegate bags handmade from 100 % Event used 1,220,000 sheets of paper natural Jute. No mobile application Communication & Limited website and brochure marketing 15,000 Delegate hand books and diaries were communication around sustainability. printed on 100 % recycled paper. Limited use of electronic signage AV was powered using smokeless, silent Bamboo stage set used for main room Audio Visual diesel generators due to no hotel backup and Modern energy efficient equipment deployed risk of power cuts. Low adoption and promotion of carbon offset Partnership established with Carbon offset and opportunity. Offsets unique website developed for conference 0% of the onsite or delegate emissions were offset.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 23© MCI
  • 25. STRENGTHS, OPPORTUNITIES AND INNOVATIONSCATERING RESPONSIBILITYEach stand in the food court featured vegetarian food andused menus printed on recycled paper. The event catereragreed to display calories for catering on demand foodpackaging (not a common practice in India) and nutritious,healthy foods were actively promoted over sugary healthysnacks with items such as fruit smoothies. A significantreduction in waste was achieved through the rejection ofplastic utensils which were completely eliminated from thefood court eating area, including plates, cutlery, and waterbottles. Food court plates were made from Arecanut leafand wooden knives, forks and spoons were used to dinewith. Cups were made of paper rather than plastic orpolystyrene.Replacing individual sachets of sugar and condiments was investigated as a means to save waste but was not implementabledue to the high level of humidity combined with heat in the rainy season in India. Water safety in India was an issue thatneeded to be well balanced with the impact of individual plastic bottles which generate a huge amount of waste. Insteadof serving bottles of water in either plastic or indeed glass, water was sourced locally and served from 20 litre re-usablecontainers. Delegates were provided with a branded water bottle for refill and re-use to reduce the use of cups andindividual water bottles. A total of 90,000 litres was consumed onsite.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 24© MCI
  • 26. RESPONSIBLE PROCUREMENTEnsuring your supply chain is as responsible as possible is a critical componentof sustainable event management and critical components of the event werereviewed using sustainability principles. The delegate bags were made usingdeaf and dumb staff employed in a workshop in Delhi who embroidered tribalimages and biodiversity native to India on a 100% natural jute material bag.Delegate gifts were selected for their cultural relevance, employment ofdisadvantaged minorities in their manufacture and choice of materials. Thedelegate pouches were manufactured with recycled textiles. Although theorganizers opted not to use a mobile application and implement a zero paperpolicy, steps were taken to ensure that where paper was used it was procuredfrom responsible sources.The 15,000 delegate conference handbooks and diaries were printed on 100%recycled paper. When organizing an event on the scale of the COP 11, powerand wider resource issues are important considerations, efforts were made toinvestigate green energy sources locally but due to the high likelihood ofunreliability, generators were considered the wisest choice of energy source.Silent and smokeless modern technology was sourced and measured. Fuelconsumption is included in our reporting metrics.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 25© MCI
  • 27. ITEM MOST COMMON OPTION USED AT COP11 Bags made of 100% jute, which is recyclable and Kit Bag Bag made of leather/raxine/Nylon produced from green sources Photo frames and Jewellery Box made of Traditional tribal art called – Dokra Stoles made of silk and locally by Gift Items Pen Holders, Crystal Souvenirs, etc. underprivileged groups. Shoulder pouches made by tribal women group using waste cloth material. Regular notepads with virgin 70/100 Notepads made of 100% handmade paper, which is Notepads gsm paper recycled and recyclable. Made of 100% certified recycled paper. Standard ink Conference Delegate Made of 150 gsm glossy paper with used, but reduced usage of full page coloured Handbook high usage of colours graphics. USB Pen Drives given to all delegates as part of the kit. All conference documents made available online Storage Medium for in real time. CDs/DVDs, printed material Conference material Limited number of print material. Total printing of 2.3 million copies, which is far less than that of COP10 at approx. 3.8 million copies.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 26© MCI
  • 28. ITEM MOST COMMON OPTION USED AT COP11 Water fountains were installed across the conference venue. Recyclable plastic bottles were given as part of the conference kits for drinking Water Containers Use of plastic water bottles water. Paper glasses were also provided at the water fountains. All paper glass were recycled. All document printing was back to back to reduce the paper usage. Further, no or extremely few documents were coloured prints (not including the documents brought by side event hosts) and official Single Side printing and “Minus one Document Printing onsite documents printed by the organiser practiced concept" the ‘Minus One’ concept, which involves reducing the font size by one point over the existing size. During COP11, all the official documents used font size 11 instead of preferred 12Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 27© MCI
  • 29. MANAGING EXHIBITIONSWhen planning the exhibition, it was vital that materials used wereas responsible as possible and would be either re-usable or donatedto a worthy cause. A huge amount of waste is often generatedthrough the use of disposable carpet and exhibition stands. Thetemporary carpet used for COP11 was specially selected for itssustainability merits; it was woven from hessian and jute, withouta foam base and was 100% biodegradable. The exhibition companywere a solid partner and ensured all materials from the eventinfrastructure were diverted from landfill, re used for other eventsor donated to impoverished communities locally. The team optedfor Octanorm exhibition booths ensuring that 100% would re-usableand natural enhancements were added as decoration fromlocal bamboo sources. Reinforced flex fabric signage wasdonated to slum dwellers in Hyderabad to construct homes andprotect from adverse weather conditions. A responsibleexhibitors policy was integrated with the exhibition manualusing the UNEP Exhibitor guidelines guiding exhibitors toreduce unnecessary waste by only shipping what was neededand choosing responsible materials for giveaways. Tosupplement the official exhibition a complimentary exhibitionfeaturing local artisans was constructed called the“Biodiversity Haat”.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 28© MCI
  • 30. STIMULATING SOCIAL AND SUSTAINABLE EXPERIENCE – THE BIODIVERSITY HAATIn order to support social enterprises and sustainable businessesfrom the region, a unique market place was constructed withinthe perimeter of the HICC-HITEX Complex and 40 local artisansand community groups were invited by Centre for EnvironmentEducation (CEE). The haat featured groups selling organicproduce, handmade artefacts and those using responsiblematerials showcasing the best example of Access & BenefitSharing. The area gave local producers a platform and readyconsumer not always so accessible and delegates frequentedthe Biodiversity Haat throughout the event.Examples of local producersincluded the “Bodhana TiruvallaSocial Science Society” who usebee products to fund and operatea Social RehabilitationProgramme; the Uravu IndigenousScience & Technology StudyCentre, a registered, non-profittrust supporting the livelihood ofrural woman through end-to-endprogrammes in bamboo growth, harvest and product manufacturing. Projects like these within the Biodiversity Haatsupported a vast number of Indian social development objectives including training in natural resource management,improving literacy, providing employment and women’s rights through to stimulating organic farming and renewableenergy sources.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 29© MCI
  • 31. Biodiversity Haat - A unique marketplace constructed within theperimeter of the HICC-HITEXComplex, with participation byover 40 artisans from across India. Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 30 © MCI
  • 32. The Biodiversity Haat demonstrated the economic multiplier effect of large scale events in a practical manner and ensured delegates took home souvenirs that were sustainable and supported some of the most impoverished communities in Andhra Pradesh.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 31© MCI
  • 33. COMMUNITY OUTREACH DONATIONLarge scale events by their nature generate waste and in many cases manyleftover materials of value. The organisers partnered with their suppliers tocollect as many donatable items as possible and identified a number of localcharities to support, providing a lifeline for those living below the poverty lineincluding the Sphoorti orphanage and a community outreach centre in Ameerpetsupporting the children of1134 Female sex workers in 12 wards (blocks) ofHyderabad, looking after their health needs, and prevention of HIV/AIDS.Similarly, flex used in the event signage and conference backdrops was cut intolarge panels and donated to local residents in Hyderabad’s poorest communitiesfor use as building materials and shields against adverse weather conditions.Materials Donated to Ameerpet Community Outreach Centre: S. No. Item No. of Packets Quantity in each Packet Total Quantity 1 Stationery Kits 3 115 345 2 Stationery Kits (loose) 29 29 3 Water Bottles 4 25 100 4 Spiral Books 4 72 288 5 Spiral Books (loose) 59 59 6 Gifts 5 100 500 7 Printed Books – Compendium on Indian 4 25 100 Biosphere Reserves 8 Rio Conventions Calendar 2 35 70A further 50 Bags, Pen sets, Bottles, Note books, Pouches, 2013 Calendars were donated to the Sphoorti orphanage.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 32© MCI
  • 34. Please accept our heartfelt thanks for your distinguished contribution of Bags, Stationery, Pouches, water bottles and diaries to Sphoorti. It is an honour that Sphoorti was chosen as a partner organization for CoP 11. Please know that your support has made a significant impact on our mission towards rehabilitation and empowerment of children in need. Srivyal Vuyyuri Founder/Director SphoortiSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 33© MCI
  • 35. LEAVING A POSITIVE LEGACY IN ANDHRA PRADESHOne of the key event objectives for the government of India and the Ministry ofEnvironment and Forests was to raise awareness and educate participants aboutIndia’s challenges, but also to reach beyond the event itself and have respect forIndia’s biodiversity filter down into the communities and villages of rural India. Thiswas achieved in a number of ways, firstly a kick-off education workshop was organisedin Hyderabad for all key suppliers including hotels, vendors and invited NGOs. Adiscussion took place about the event objectives, their roles in the supply chain,commitment and benefits in making CoP11 a sustainable event. 50 organisationsattended the two hour workshop and follow on meetings were organised.The Biodiversity Haat and procurement process were deployed to ensure that theeconomic impact of the event was funnelled to the most responsible businesses andbeyond direct economic benefit the event provided a platform to exhibit and sell theirorganic produce and raise the profile of the social enterprises present.Focusing on education in the wider Andhra Pradesh Community, the MOEF launchedboth an educational campaign and legacy project for the city. A special educationalpamphlet was designed and distributed to 250,000 people within Andhra Pradeshpromoting the value and importance of preserving India’s biodiversity and architectswere contracted to design an impactful and lasting gift to the local community; theBiodiversity pylon and Park in Hyderabad. A 15 acre plot of land in Gachibowli wasearmarked for the development of an architectural monument, park and museum forthe city and representative ministers and VIPS attending the event from around theworld planted over 300 rare and endangered plant species in the proposed park.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 34© MCI
  • 36. A total of 100 crore rupees ($18,264,858) was invested in the development and the site was inaugurated by Hon. Prime Minister of India - Dr. Manmohan Singh during the event. The centrepiece of the park is a 46 ft steel and 800 kg stone pillar symbolizing the 23 male and 23 female chromosomes and wealth of nature. Around the pillar, educational panels and designs instruct and inform visitors about the richness and value of the earth’s biodiversity. A PR agency was appointed On the occasion of this to ensure that the contents and value of conference, I am pleased to the meeting were spread beyond the walls launch the Hyderabad Pledge and announce that of the convention centre and a number of our Government has informative articles made it into the local decided to earmark a sum press including articles linking biodiversity of US$ 50 million during to health. India’s presidency of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity to strengthen the institutional mechanism for biodiversity conservation in India. Dr. Manmohan Singh Prime Minister of IndiaSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 35© MCI
  • 37. WASTE MANAGEMENT APPROACHThe management of waste was a key sustainability objective for theevent with an ambitious 80% waste diversion rate, higher than manyconferences in the United States or Europe. A strong and able partnerwas appointed in the shape of “Ramky Enviro Engineers” and inpartnership with the event management team an excellent 91% wastediversion rate was achieved. 24 sets of 5 bins each with clear colourcoding, recognisable symbols and descriptions in the 6 Official UNlanguages were strategically placed around the venue.The MCI team worked with the venue to improve the placement of thebins during the conference and to ensure sufficient receptacles wereprovided throughout the setup and breakdown of the event. The clustersof colour coded bins were each managed by a dedicated housekeeperwho were available to educate and guide the delegates in the correctsegregation of waste. Waste was further segregated at source andtransported between 11.30PM and 6AM to avoid traffic. Ramky staffmaintained an interactive stand onsite detailing the process of collectionsegregation, disposal, recycling and reuse.The entire waste management was conducted in accordance with theguidelines of Municipal Solid Waste (Management & Handling) Rules,2000 as laid down by Ministry Environment & Forest, Govt. of India. Over19 days the event generated a whopping 24.55 metric tonnes of trash. An astounding 9,924 kg of waste comprised of paperand cloth alone, 8,424 kg was generated by half eaten and left over food by the delegates and this was followed by plasticSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 36© MCI
  • 38. (4,621 kg), glass (991 kg) and metal (595 kg). 85 percent of event waste was directly recycled, 3% turned to energy at arefuse derived fuel (RDF) plant, 16% evaporate as moisture and the remaining 9% went to landfill. AVERAGE AVERAGE COMPONENTS PLASTIC METAL GLASS PAPER (EXCLUDING FOOD (INCLUDING FOOD FOOD WASTE) WASTE) Weight loss after dehydration (moisture content loss) 2% 2% 2% 6% 3% 70% 16% Total waste recycled 76% 88% 85% 87% 84% 22% 72% Inerts diverted to Landfill 9% 10% 13% 5% 9% 8% 9% Diversion to refuse-derived fuel plant 13% -- -- 2% 4% -- 3% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%Recycling was conducted as follows:  Paper: Sent to “Wealth out of Waste” Initiative, where the paper is to be used by ITC Bhadrachalam for recycling.  Plastic: Sent to plastic recycling plant at Balanagar, Hyderabad for recycling. End Product is granules/flakes  Food: Is composted for organic manure and being used for gardening  Metal: Sent to metal recycling facility at Hardware Park  Glass: Provided to glass recycling facility in HyderabadSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 37© MCI
  • 39. SUMMARY OF WASTE DIVERSION AND RECYCLING Landfilled Converted to Energy 9.00% 3.00% Evaporation loss 16.00% Recycled Waste 72.00% Recycled Waste Evaporation loss Converted to Energy LandfilledSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 38© MCI
  • 40. INCREASING SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE 1. BUILD ENGAGEMENT EARLY Considering the scale of the event and short notice involved in the appointment of the key suppliers much was achieved but opportunities exist for improvement. Sustainability is a challenge to integrate late in the process. For future events there is a clear opportunity to build on the initial achievements and wider integrate and communicate sustainability expectations to hotel partners. A recommended step would be to include sustainability criteria as a core component and clause in supplier selection for every area of the event and follow up commitments with contracting clauses relating to sustainability objectives. Once destinations and key suppliers are selected, a sustainability team composed of representatives of the secretariat, local host organization and key event suppliers should be created to drive the process and to ensure accountability and that objectives are represented at each point of the planning process. Widening the engagement and starting the process easier would enable wider collection of data (exact data of all hotel energy consumption and waste production was not collected). A recommended minimum target for COP 12 would be to obtain data from the key 10 hotels hosting delegates to understand and benchmark performance and improve footprint calculations. 2. CARBON RESPONSIBILITY The CoP 11 on biodiversity made great strides in recognising the potential emissions of events and collecting the data relating to the event site, transport and catering. However, with the data collected no offsetting or mitigation has taken place. Steps to be considered include ensuring delegates take greater responsibility for their travel related emissions with stronger messaging. Delegates could be invited to voluntary offset their emissions or a small offsetting fee could be integrated as standard into the registration costs to ensure greater uptake. In line with the travel impact, the UN could consider seeking a sponsor to offset event emissions or encourage event hosts to be accountable and offset any emissions relating to the event location. Care should be taken to select a certified offsetting project in alignment with the UN’s criteria.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 39© MCI
  • 41. 3. SCALE UP SOCIAL The Biodiversity Haat was a commendable innovation and example to all major events of how to integrate social enterprises. To build on this success, further efforts can be made to widen the hands on community activity beyond the VIPs and engage the delegates in a community service event either onsite or offsite. This is especially relevant in developing nations where need is clearly evident. Opportunities exist to further engage local communities to produce items needed for the event such as table decorations, organic food supplies and delegate lanyards. An interesting opportunity for events of this size exists in evaluating the economic impact of the delegates, collecting stronger data about the attendees’ visits would allow for a clearer picture of the economic multiplier effect in stimulating employment and spending in host destinations. 4. STRUCTURING SUSTAINABILITY To support sustainability objectives, event management best practice would recommend further structuring the process. This would commence from the request for proposal stage through the procurement filter and contracting and include the definition of an event sustainability policy alongside the goals and objectives. The policy would allow for clearer communication around sustainability expectations and requirements to suppliers and partners. This policy would be formally integrated into the procurement processes and communicated through the event website and supporting communications to suppliers, speakers, exhibitors, delegates and other stakeholders. The UN could consider adopting the international event sustainability management standard launched in June 2012. ISO20121 provides guidance on how to build a sustainable event management system, incorporating key elements of ISO14001, ISO26000 (social responsibility) and ISO9001 (quality). Implementation of ISO20121 would help to build a more robust event management system with clearly defined and documented processes. 5. TAKE BOLD STEPS Innovating for any reason requires an element of risk and a willingness to change. Great opportunities exist for event enhancement, cost saving and improvement of the delegate experience by taking bold steps in the planningSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 40© MCI
  • 42. process. Although the organisers of this event were resistant to eliminating paper, clear opportunities are present in both saving cost and increasing functionality. Over 1 million sheets of paper were used by the organisers alone. The UN has launched the “Smart Paper initiative” with the introduction of a mobile application eliminating the need for conference hand-outs and a significant amount of waste, it would also enhance the capability of the organizers to communicate with delegates. Further innovation can be used across the board to improve the experience of both the planners and delegates with electronic signage, the elimination of more transportation and the widening the inclusion of FLOSS (Fresh, local, organic, sustainable, seasonal) food products. Particularly interesting for a convention on protecting biodiversity is the concept of event space measurement and “offsetting” to protect wildlife habitat and the “offsetting” of event water consumption by the construction of a reservoir in accordance with water used. These initiatives would have left a positive legacy supporting the key issue of the CBD and sustainability challenge of Andhra Pradesh. 6. AMPLIFY COMMUNICATION Due to the complexity of the organisation for the COP 11 with a number of competing websites maintained by both the event hosts and CBD secretariat, delegates lacked a single information point for the event. This fragmentation made the sustainability communication difficult and led to the low uptake of the travel carbon emission offsetting programme. Delegates registering through CBD but receiving local information through the host destination’s website. To further amplify the messaging a solid communication plan with sustainability weaved throughout and the use of storytelling would improve performance supported by stronger PR celebrating sustainability achievements. To improve communication and engagement, sustainability messaging needs to be integrated within the mainstream communication channels and key touch points relevant to the audience, this extends across the event from informing delegates both pre event and onsite to educating exhibitors about their impact and recognising increased performance.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 41© MCI
  • 43. CONCLUSIONThe 11th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CoP11 to CBD) took responsible steps toimplement an event in line with the UN Global Compact Principles. Notable progress was made by working with eventpartners to improve sustainability in a region where event sustainability is a developing concept and particularlycommendation should be given to the solid waste management approach and performance. With a commitment to constantimprovement and by implementing the practical recommendations outlined in this report, the UN Convention onBiodiversity serves as a role model and guide for others in the meetings industry.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 42© MCI
  • 44. CREDITSAUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORSThis report has been developed with direction from the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) G3 Sustainability ReportingGuidelines and the Event Organizers Sector Supplement.Data in this report relates to the COP MOP6 and COP11 to CBD which took place from October 1 st through to October 19th,2012. It covers all areas of event logistics and production that were managed by MCI Management India Pvt. Ltd..This report was prepared by Roger Simons of MCI Sustainability Services with the valuable input, contribution and supportof Lalit Chadha, Shikhar Gupta and Akash Nath Garg of MCI India with the support of Victor Ogbuneke of Secretariat of theConvention on Biological Diversity (SCBD) in Montréal. Special thanks go to Ministry of Environment and Forests,Government of India and all the event suppliers who supported this tremendous undertaking and supported thesustainability objectives with commitment and passion.Sustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 43© MCI
  • 45. ABOUT MCI SUSTAINABILITY SERVICESMCI is proud to be seen as industry thought leader in sustainable event management and consulting. MCIis actively engaged in efforts to change the way the world meets through the promotion of smart,sustainable business solutions.MCI is the selected Professional Congress Organizer and Sustainability Guide for more than 130 of theworld’s leading events on sustainable development and the renewable energy sectors, including:The UN Climate Change Conference (COP15), the 11th Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity(CoP11 to CBD), the GRI Global Conference on Sustainability and Reporting, the Climate Group Asian Business Summit onClimate Leadership, the Rio+20 Corporate Sustainability Forum and the United Nations Global Compact Leaders Summit.www.mci-group.com/csrCONTACTIn the interest of constant improvement, all ideas and comments about this report are welcome. Please address commentsto Roger Simons, MCI Group Sustainability Manager – Roger.Simons@mci-group.comPHOTO CREDITS  Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India  Akash Nath Garg – MCI India  Roger Simons – MCI Sustainability ServicesSustainable Event Assessment – CoP11 to CBD Page 44© MCI

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