Our GBU bioepistemological educational project (BEEMP)

1,280 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,280
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
169
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Our GBU bioepistemological educational project (BEEMP)

  1. 1. The GBU bioepistemological educational model project (BEEMP)®
  2. 2. 1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 Our GBU Bioepistemological Educational Model Project (BEEMP) ®
 CONTENT
 
 
 •Our
theoretical
starting
point
 
 •Theoretical
Foundation
of
our
Educational
Model
 
 •Educational
Foundations
of
the
Giordano
Bruno
GlobalShift
University

 I. Technopedagogy
I
­
Online
Pedagogical
Model

 
 II. The
Collaborative
Virtual
Education.­
WEB
2.0


 
 III. Processes
for
implementing
the
GBU
Pedagogical
Model
 
 IV. Steps
towards
the
Technopedagogical
Design
of
a
100%
virtual
 learning
environment


 
 a. Content
Development

 b. Periodical
Content
Updating
 c. Instructional
and
Multimedia
Design
 d. Tutorial
Design
 e. Platform
User
Support

 
 V. Giordano
Bruno
GlobalShift
University
Diagram
 
 VI. About
the
Academic
Professionals
 
 VII. The
Modules,
The
Units
 
 VIII. Synthesis,
as
a
conclusion
about
the
structure
of
a
course
 
 

  3. 3. 2Our
theoretical
starting
point

Behind
the
foundation
of
our
higher
education
global
Project
‐the
Giordano
Bruno
University‐
underlies
a
major
revolutionary
bio‐epistemological,
philosophical
and
pedagogical
 model
 of
 thought.
 This
 model
 springs
 from
 new
 research
 and
understanding
of
the
phenomenal
processes
of
the
biological
acquisition
of
human
knowledge,
 carried
 out
 by
 the
 neurosciences1
 and
 confronted
 with
 cultural
objectionable
outcomes
 produced
 throughout
 the
millenarian
construction
of
our
history.

Scholarly
 based,
 our
 project
 emerges,
 first,
 from
 the
 evolution
 of
 intertwined
philosophical,
 cultural
 and
biological
contemporary
research
 concerning
the
 final
“state
 of
 our
 World”.
 
 Second,
 from
 a
 very
 serious
 critique
 of
 the
 perceptible
present
 cultural
 models
 and
 organizational
 realities.
 And
 third,
 from
 our
commitment
 to
 construct
 a
 better
 future
 based
 in
 the
 foreseeable
 possibilities
 of
our
cognitive,
cultural
and
biological
human
condition.



Theoretical
Foundation
of
our
Educational
Model

The
 new
 bio‐epistemological
 perspective
 of
 our
 understanding,
 
 and
 the
 ulterior
model
 of
 administration
 and
 distribution
 of
 knowledge
 built
 through
 a
 frame
 of
time
and
space
‐defined
as
civilization2‐
created
behind
the
manifestations
of
our
recorded
 human
 history,
 a
 silent
 form
 of
 human
 software,
 recorded
 into
 the
archetypical
specifics
of
our
neuro‐physiology.

The
above
has
happened
more
or
less
in
a
scientific
and
identifiable
way
oscillating
in
the
different
eras
and
places
of
our
history;
either,
as
the
primitive
holistic
and
symbolic
 appreciation
 of
 reality,
 
 evident
 in
 the
 mythical,
 sacred
 and
 heroic
narratives
 (stone,
 clay
 or
 paper)
 or
 ‐in
 more
 recent
 times‐
 in
 the
 scientific
achievement
of
our
bioepistemological
development
present
in
the
rational
linear
processes
 of
 a
 logical
 construction
 of
 knowledge
 that
 highlights
 the
 lack
 of
 a
holistic
approach.3


In
 summary,
 and
 for
 the
 sake
 of
 underlining
 the
 academic
 tools
 of
 the
technopedagogy
built
to
support
our
GBU
educational
Project,
we
assume
that
our
“present
 symbolic
 thinking
 era”
 was
 created
 by
 the
 holistic
 capabilities
 and
perception
of
our
brain
giving
birth
to
a
complex
World.

In
parallel,
our
multiple
forms
 of
 social
 and
 economic
 organization
 created
 our
 primitive
 and
 (still)
theocratic
 civilizations,
 expressed
 in
 their
 religious,
 political
 and
 economic
structures.
 This
 opened
 the
 door
 to
 a
 modern
 scientific
 and
 technological
environment,
 that
 today,
 enters
 schizophrenically
 in
 conflict
 with
 the
 ancient
1 New neuroscientific research transforming neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, psychology, education- is openinginexhaustible topics to improve human life not only about health and curing brain diseases alzheimer, parkinson,autism, effects of stress, etc. - but also about the promising possibilities of a different functioning of the brain to findcreative solutions to human problems.2 Cfr. Braudel, Fernand (1995), El as, Norberto (1987), Wolf, Eric (2001, 1999, 1982), for a deep understanding of thehistorical development of mankind from a vision of a long scale of time.3 Cfr. Gibbons et al.
  4. 4. 3structural
 leftovers
 of
 our
 primal
 and
 phenomenally
 created
 contents
 of
consciousness.

The
famous
 bicameral
mind
 hypothesis
 (Julian
 Janes,
 1990:84)
versus
the
 debate
about
left
and
right
cerebral
dominance
over
linear
–abstract‐
and
holistic
‐evident
and
spatial‐
thinking
of
our
species,
in
conjunction
with
the
last
one
hundred
years
of
intense
neuroscience
investigation,
teaches
us
that
the
human
perception
of
the
World
 has
 gone
 through
 this
 primitive
 process
 from
 spatial
 (possibly
 right
 brain
dominance)
 to
 logical‐mathematical
 (still
 hypothetical
 left
 brain
 dominance),
 for
the
construction
of
a
subjective
truth.
Neither
one
of
these
theories,
has
achieved
an
epistemological
grand
synthesis
of
the
whole
or
the
particular.


This
 theoretical
 and
 still
 hypothetical
 knowledge
 of
 our
 human
 thinking
 and
 the
processes
 of
 acquisition
 and
 distribution
 of
 knowledge,
 give
 us
 an
 educated
 hint
about
 the
 brain’s
 structure
 and
 functioning.
 In
 the
 same
 way
 that
 the
 bilateral
anatomy
 of
 our
 eyes
 (vision)
 and
 ears
 (dimensional
 perception)
 perform
 the
function
 of
 the
 respective
 stereoscopic
 and
 stereophonic
 capabilities
 to
 perceive
the
 World
 in
 a
 multidimensional
reality,
 our
brain
has
been
 similarly
configured.
This
is
evident
in
its
bilateral
hemispheric
structure.



Ears
and
eyes
are
anatomically
and
apparently
constructed
to
interact
among
them
through
the
 corpus
 callosum
 to
 naturally
 synthesize
 the
 perception
 of
 the
 whole
with
the
particular,
the
abstract
with
the
evident,
the
linear
with
the
spatial,
and
so
on,
 creating
 not
 a
 new
 lateralized
or
partial
 thinking,
but
a
 holistic
perception
of
reality
 which,
 if
 not
 blocked
 by
 our
 cultural
 linear
 preconceptions,
 will
 naturally
exponentiate
the
possibilities
of
our
human
potentials
and
understanding.

The
cognitive
synthesis
in
this
line
of
thinking,
will
be
our
“stereo
cognition”

(as
stereophonic
or
stereoscopic),
the
brain’s
simultaneous
and
conscious
perception
of
reality
as
a
totality.
Taking
this
into
the
field
of
education
and
distribution
of
the
commodity
 of
 knowledge
 will
 necessarily
 change
 our
 conventional
 vision
 of
classical
 pedagogy.
 One
 very
 often
 based
 in
 the
 hierarchical
 transmission
 of
accumulated,
 culturally
 subjective
 information,
 structured
 using
 a
 mixture
 of
sources
 found
 in
 the
 preeminence
 of
 logic
 and
 the
 dogmatic
 principles
 of
 our
metaphysical
 tradition
 (or
 even
 worse),
 grounded
 in
 the
 neural
 records
 of
 our
short
term
historical
memory,
product
of
the
left
or
right
dominance
of
our
brain.


This
is
the
anachronistic
pedagogy
which
actually
teaches
us
how
to
survive
and
be
aware
of
our
immediate
perceptible
reality,
and
the
one
we
have
to
overcome.

With
 this
 set
 of
 scientific
 data
 and
 the
 cultural
 synthesis
 of
 our
 abstract
introspection,
we
firmly
believe
that
the
time
has
come
to
revise
our
pedagogical
tradition
from
a
bio‐epistemological
perspective,
which
will
necessarily
lead
us
to
propose
a
new
post‐modern
“stereo
cognitive”
holistic
education.

This
 idea
 implies
 a
 revolutionary
 revision
 of
 the
 theoretical
 framework
 of
 our
classical
 methodologies
 of
 teaching
 and
 learning,
 as
 well
 as,
 the
 traditional
administrative
foundation
of
higher
education
institutions.


  5. 5. 4Much
of
this
 has
to
 do
 with
 the
 perception
 and
comprehension
of
 the
interaction
that
 occurs
 between
 the
 whole
 and
 the
 particular,
 in
 the
 sense
 that
 institutional
education
 has
 evolved,
 amongst
 others,
 from
 the
 culturally
 biased
 frame
 of
 the
particular
 (notwithstanding
 its
 religious,
 political
 or
 economic
 roots)
 to
 the
universal,
very
often
systemic
and
scientifically
based
frame.
In
a
general
analysis
of
 our
 history,
 this
 still
 postulates
 an
 incomplete
 vision
 of
 the
 world
 and
impoverishes
our
educational
and
cognitive
realities.

The
above
is
even
more
complicated
when
we
realize
that
in
the
field
of
education,
from
medieval
times
to
present,
the
main
actors
have
 been
the
religious,
political
or
 economic
 power
 holders,
 who
 throughout
 the
 centuries
 have
 declared
 their
universities
as
open
spaces
to
promote
the
“universality
of
knowledge”,
these
were
founded
and
are
operating
to
self‐preserve
their
meta‐educational
privileges.

The
 challenge
 of
 our
 age
 is
 to
 overcome
 this
 ancient
 and
 stubborn
 instructional
paradigm
 by
 going
 beyond
 the
 foundational
 power
 of
 traditional
 institutions,
 by
designing
new
forms
of
education
with
a
supra‐religious,
supranational
and
supra‐economic
scope
and
with
a
new
holistic
pedagogical
methodology
that
could
help
us
 to
 break
 away
 from
 the
 prisons
 of
 our
 instructional
 heritage
 and
 take
 a
 step
forward
in
the
awakening
of
a
new
evolutionary
consciousness
for
humanity.


With
 these
 ideas
 in
 mind
 we
 postulate
 a
 major
 deconstructive
 exercise
 in
 the
ontological,
 epistemological
 and
 axiological
 thinking
 chapters
 of
 our
 civilization.
We
 propose
 to
 essentially
 change
 our
 negative
 self‐conscious
 human
 archetype
inspired
 in
 our
 imperfect,
 still
 religious‐oriented
 narratives
 to
 a
 new
 positive
ontological
 self‐image.
 Our
 consciousness,
 in
 its
 turn,
 will
 impact
 the
deconstruction
of
the
epistemological
and
axiological
contents
of
civilization.

So
 we,
 the
 contemporary
 humans,
inspired
in
a
 new
 axiology
consistent
 with
the
most
 recent
 insights
 from
 neurosciences,
 could
 gradually
 proceed,
 to
 the
intellectual
 deconstruction
 of
 the
 self‐fulfilling
 prophecy
 of
 subordination,
unconsciousness
and
insecurity
we
have
unconsciously
self
imposed
and
mirrored
in
our
deterministic
fate
and
repetitive
historical
human
development.


Educational
 Foundations
 of
 the
 Giordano
 Bruno
 GlobalShift
University

Once
deconstruction
is
accepted
in
the
notion
of
“the
World
of
our
making”,
and
no
longer
 in
 the
 fatal
 predetermined
 outcomes
 of
 our
 metaphysical
 tradition,
 we
categorically
 establish
 the
 three
 pedagogical
 foundations
 of
 our
 educational
project:
 non­subordinative,
 intercultural
 and
 trans­disciplinary.
 The
 latter
foundations
 are
 necessary
 for
 the
 holistic
 understanding
 of
 our
 World
 by
 our
students,
in
 consistence
 with
 the
stereo‐cognitive
capacity
 to
link
 the
whole
 with
the
particular
and
achieve
a
full
grasp
of
the
intercultural
and
trans‐disciplinarian
knowledge.

From
 this
 conception,
 our
 challenge
 was
 to
 translate
 these
 philosophical
 and
pedagogical
 principles
 into
 a
 concrete
 techno‐pedagogy
 and
 bio‐epistemological

  6. 6. 5instructional
 tools
 that
 could
 be,
 in
 the
 pragmatic
 field
 of
 education,
 transmitted
and
factually
experienced
by
our
multicultural
students.

We
enter
in
a
brick
by
brick
conceptual
construction
of
our
instructional
design,
by
structuring
the
tools
to
foster
stereo‐cognitive
thinking
of
our
students,
by
linking
in
 every
 step
 of
 the
 student’s
 compulsory
 reflective
 work
 and
 the
 permanent
association
 of
 the
whole
 with
 the
particular,
specially
in
 the
confluential
areas
of
the
 transcultural
 and
 trans‐disciplinary
 fields
 of
 our
 academic
 programs
 and
contents
of
study.


The
 emergent
 outcome
 was
 a
 collaborative
 intercultural
 and
 interdisciplinary
system
 of
 virtual
 interaction
 among
 students
 of
 all
 nationalities,
 creeds
 and
cultural
 backgrounds
 in
 a
 custom
 made
 “WholeLife
 experience"
 educational
techno‐pedagogical
proprietary
system.

  7. 7. 6






































 TECHNOPEDAGOGY I Online Pedagogical Model
  8. 8. 7
Educational
Online
Model

 
Not
many
years
ago,
traditional
pedagogical
models
were
centered
in
teaching
and
most
of
them
used
the
presential
modality.
They
presupposed
that
the
teacher
was
the
 exclusive
 owner
 of
 knowledge
 and
 students
 should
 passively
 receive
knowledge
by
memorizing
it.
However,
two
decades
ago,
the
scientific
advances
on
Pedagogy,
reoriented
education
towards
a
new
pedagogical
model,
which
asserts,
in
 order
 to
 educate,
 that
 teaching
 processes
 must
 be
 conceived
 bounded
 to
 a
learning
process.

Although
these
are
recent
changes,
there’s
no
doubt
that
the
model
is
still
changing
while
 finding
 that
 students
 should
 obtain
 knowledge
 to
 enable
 specific
 
 skills
 as
future
 professionals.
 Therefore,
 in
the
present
context
of
a
 society
of
information
and
 knowledge,
 learning
 to
 build
 skills
 comes
 in
 strict
 closeness
 with
 the
 use
 of
new
technology
to
boost
its
development.

Today,
 the
 new
information
 and
 communication
technologies
progress
aligned
 to
WEB
 2.0,
 that
 allows
 networking
 in
 social
 and
 virtual
 environments
 for
learning.

This
system
 enables
 the
 creation
of
collaborative
 and
 flexible
spaces
 of
 teaching‐learning,
 that
 provide
 students
 with
 a
 bigger
 autonomy,
 making
 teacher
accompaniment
 possible,
 as
 well
 as
 the
 frequent,
 permanent
 counseling
 and
communication
with
his
mates.
Promoted
by
modern
pedagogy
since
the
eighties,
the
teacher
has
assumed
the
role
of
a
learning
facilitator
who
gives
the
student
the
opportunity
to
build
his
own
knowledge.

The
 possibility
 to
 drive
 teaching‐learning
 as
 an
 interaction
 between
 the
 teacher
and
 the
 student,
 evolving
 in
 parallel
 with
 the
 boosting
 of
 technological
development,
 is
 an
 ambitious
 promise.
 It
 offers
 us
 the
 certainty
 that
 UNs
Educative
Millennium
Goal
can
be
fulfilled
with
the
current
technological
tools.


  9. 9. 8


 II VIRTUAL COLLABORATIVE EDUCATION - WEB 2.0
  10. 10. 9

Virtual
Collaborative
Education
–
WEB
2.0
 
 Virtual
 education
 uses
 tools
 from
 the
 new
 communication
 and
 information
technologies
to
support
and
modernize
the
new
process
of
 teaching‐learning
with
more
effectiveness.
It
allows
the
student
to
work
 in
an
independent,
collaborative
and
multicultural
way,
in
rhythm
with
 his
capabilities
and
possibilities.

 
 The
system
holds
the
next
advantages:
 
 • Increases
 the
 capacity
 of
 critical
 thinking,
 self‐management
 and
 the
abilities
for
solving
general
and
specific
practical
problems.
 • Uses
WEB
2.0
capacities
together
with
the
resources
of
electronic
 communication
networks.
 • Uses
synchronous
and
asynchronous
communication
tools.
 • Promotes
 de‐centralized
 knowledge:
 professors
 and
 students
 located
 in
 different
 places
 with
 Internet
 access
 and
 information
 available
 at
the
time
it
is
required,
distributed
by
the
thousands
 of
servers
around
the
world.
In
our
system,
learning
can
happen
 and
be
facilitated
regardless
of
place
and
time.
 • The
 student
 can
 move
 forward,
 backward,
 review
 or
 deepen
 in
 the
 information
 and
 learning
 process
 according
 to
 his
 rhythm
 and
achievements.
 • There
 are
 virtual
 simulation
 systems
 between
 students
 and
 professors
which
provide
important
experimental
learning.
 • All
accessible
information
can
be
reviewed
and
updated
to
fulfill
 the
 needs,
 creativity
 and
 inventiveness
 of
 each
 student,
 and
 be
 reused
and
shared
with
all
the
educative
community.
 • Motivates
 long
 distance
 communication
 giving
 the
 bases
 to
 create
multicultural
environments.
 • Collaboration
between
students
with
different
cultures
creates
a
 multicultural
learning
environment,
as
students,
academic
tutors
 and
professors
coexist
within
a
course
environment
and
beyond.
 



  11. 11. 10

 III. Processes for implementing the GBU model
  12. 12. 11



Processes
for
implementing
the
GBU
Model

The
implementation
of
the
GBU
techno‐pedagogical
model,
in
the
context
of
Virtual
Education,
 is
 one
 of
 the
 capital
 challenges
of
 our
educational
 proposal.
 It
 aims
to
guarantee
excellence
and
go
beyond
the
conventional
international
standards.

Our
 techno‐pedagogical
 model
 constitutes
 the
 main
 strategy
 for
 achieving
 active
student
participation
and
meaningful
learning,
by
the
interaction
of
the
educative
community
of
the
Giordano
Bruno
GlobalShift
University.

The
model
focuses
on
the
following
points:

 • Incorporating
 the
 pedagogical,
 didactic
 and
 technological
 strategies
 of
 the
 WholeLife
 Platform
 providing
 autonomous,
 cooperative
 and
 collaborative
knowledge,
and,
most
of
all,
a
knowledge
oriented
towards
 the
development
of
creativity.
 • The
 teaching‐learning
 process
 seeks
 to
 create
 personal
 interaction
 between
 tutor‐student,
 student‐student,
 and
 student‐educative
 complements.
 • Resources
 and
 WEB
 2.0
 elements
 are
 addressed
 for
 adequate
 communication,
 facilitating
 synchronous
 and
 asynchronous
 communication.
 • Learning
 assessments
 will
 be
 based
 on
 best
 practices
 of
 conventional
 evaluation
methods,
but
will
add
new
assessment
and
peer‐assessment
 techniques,
 which
 have
 proved
 important
 and
 effective
 in
 learning
 evaluation.
 • Tutorships
 will
 be
 a
 complementary
 space
 for
 reflection
 on
 the
 praxis
 and
 contents
 by
 the
 educative
 community,
 centered
 in
 the
 interaction
 between
 the
 student
 and
 professor,
 students
 among
 themselves
 and
 other
virtual
social
networks.
 
Considering
 the
 previous
 characteristics,
 we
 propose
 a
 number
 of
 processes
 and
tools
 that
 compose
 the
 GBGU
 Techno‐pedagogical
 Model.
 This
 will
 make
accreditation
supported
by
100%
virtual
learning
environments
possible.
  13. 13. 12













 IV STAGES FOR THE TECHNOPEDAGOGICAL DESIGN
  14. 14. 13
Stages
for
the
Technopedagogical
Design
of
100%
Virtual
Learning
Environments.



 



Content
Development

The
content
of
GBGU
programs
has
been
developed
by
specialists
in
each
discipline
to
 meet
 higher
 academic
 and
 quality
 standards.
 The
 programmatic
 part
 of
 the
content,
has
been
design
by
Doctors,
all
standing
specialists
in
their
disciplines.


The
development
of
the
programs
comprised
four
phases:

 a. Curricular
Design
 b. Content
Production
 c. Bibliography
selection
 d. Selection
of
Electronic
Bibliographic
Resources

Periodical
updating
of
contents

To
keep
 the
 validity
 of
 our
 contents,
we
will
keep
current
through
a
process
that
includes
specific
and
new
needs
for
each
course.
The
academic
office
will
develop
a
master
plan
according
to
the
proper
requisites
of
each
specialty.



Instructional
Design
and
Multimedia
Instructional
Design

The
 Instructional
 Design
 of
 the
 pedagogical
 process
 followed
 by
 students
 covers
the
following
stages:

 1. Analysis
of
the
educational
material
 2. Analysis
of
User’s
typology

  15. 15. 14 3. Instructional
Plan
 4. Educational
Techniques
 5. On‐line
and
educational
situations
and
activities



Multimedia
Design

Multimedia
 Design
 is
 about
 adapting
 the
 content
 and
 educational
 activities
 for
their
 delivery
 in
 Multimedia
 resources
 that
 appeal
 to
 students
 for
 its
 quality,
creativity
and
richness.


Tutorial
Design

The
GBGU
educational
 model
 incorporates
academic
 tutors
in
a
 strategic
 place
of
the
teaching‐learning
process.
The
role
of
tutors
is
to
accompany,
guide
and
advise
the
 student
 throughout
 the
 learning
 process.
 A
 tutor
 monitors
 the
 
 students
process.
His
main
functions
are:
 • Supervise
the
learning
process.
 • Keep
 student
 motivation,
 establishing
 a
 relation
 of
 continuous
 trust
 and
 communication,
 promoting
 his
 participation
 and
 supervising
 his
 performance
until
the
end
of
the
course.

 • The
 tutor
 is
 mainly
 responsible
 for
 logistic
 support
 and
 triggering
 the
 students’
perseverance
within
the
online
system.
 • Provide
students
with
different
learning
resources
within
the
technological
 model,
links,
documents,
network
resources,
etc.
 • Encourage
students
to
efficiently
use
the
systemss
communicative
tools
for
 collaborative
learning
and
interaction
(chat,
forum,
blogs,
wikis,
etc).
 • Assess
individual
homework
and
chair
teamwork.
 
The
 tutor
 is
 not
 the
 author
 of
 the
 didactic
 material,
 but
 becomes
 a
 consultant‐professor
for
the
themes
developed
in
a
course.
This
is
why,
the
tutor’s
formation
and
 training
 is
 a
 fundamental
 element
 of
 GBGUs
 techno‐pedagogical
 structure
addressed
 to
 facilitate
 the
 adaptation
 of
 professors
 to
 a
 new
 role
 as
 online
teachers.

The
 training
 of
 tutors
 is
 essentially
 practical,
 and
 will
 be
 delivered
 through
 the
same
multimedia
resources
than
students.

The
majority
online
tutorship
will
be
basically
delivered
in
written
format,
so
they
involve
working
time.
As
long
as
tutorships
are
recorded
as
texts
in
an
intelligent
knowledge
base,
they
become
interactive
learning
materials
for
future
generations.

Students
 will
 receive
 answers
 to
 their
 questions
 and
 arguments
 in
 no
 more
 than
18
hours
in
labor
days
and
36
hours
on
weekends.


  16. 16. 15
We
consider
that
the
success
of
this
100%
online
education
rests
in
two
essential
elements:

 . 
The
quality
of
the
contents,
and
the
continuous
updating
and
 validity
in
their
multimedia
delivery.
 . 
The
strategic
presenter
and
motivating
role
of
the
tutor
in
the
 online
academic
processes.
 
It
is
necessary
then,
to
establish
the
order,
parameters
and
specific
rules
that
will
allow
tutors
the
correct
attention
in
the
follow
up
of
each
of
the
students.

It
is
also
important
to
clearly
outline
the
scope
of
their
functions,
as
well
as
generating
the
figure
of
tutor
Coordinators
to
supervise
and
advise
tutors.
GBGU
is
responsible
for
providing
periodical
updating
related
to
best
tutorial
practices.
Instructional
 Design
 will
 deliver
 a
 Training
 Course
 for
 Tutors
 that
 considers
 the
following
questions:

 1. Introduction
to
the
GBGU
Techno‐pedagogical
Model.
 2. Activities
to
keep
Student
motivation.
 3. Handbook
for
Tutors.
 4. Guide
and
parameters
for
content
engagement.
 5. Consulting
and
orientation
on
the
multimedia
platform
and
tools.
 6. Effective
learning
activities.
 7. Conventional
and
critical
monitoring.
 8. Assessment.
 
User
platform
support

In
 practice,
 online
 systems
 work
 efficiently
 when
 they
 rely
 on
 a
 team
 of
collaborators
in
charge
of
giving
technical
support
to
users.

This
 team
 is
 responsible
 for
 tracking
 applications
 and
 ranking
 of
 the
 cases
 that
need
technical
support
and
concrete
resolutions
of
problems.

It
 is
 very
 important
 to
 have
 an
 optimum
 communication
 cycle
 between
 the
supportive
 technical
 team
 and
 the
 users,
 which
 should
 be
 completed
 in
 a
reasonable
timeframe.
If
GBU
does
not
comply
with
this,
there
will
very
probably
be
 a
 high
 risk
 of
 creating
 disappointment
 and
 frustration
 in
 users,
 increasing
desertion
level.
Our
 supportive
 system
 will
 follow
 each
 of
 the
 cases
 thoroughly
 through
applications
controlled
by
support‐tickets
and
attended
in
no
more
than
18
hours
and
36
in
weekends.


  17. 17. 16
 V GIORDANO BRUNO GLOBALSHIFT UNIVERSITY DIAGRAM
  18. 18. 17
GIORDANO
BRUNO
GLOBALSHIFT
UNIVERSITY
DIAGRAM

The
next
diagram
presents
the
form
and
fundamental
principles
for
the
delivery
of
our
 online
 education
 model.
 It
 anticipates
 the
 standard
 format
 
 containing
 
 the
philosophy
and
the
central
purpose
of
our
university.


This
 purpose
 is,
 in
 essence,
 to
 liberate
 the
 student
 from
 the
 fears,
 trends
 and
ancestral
 complexes
 of
 the
 human
 being
 arising
 from
 the
 ontological
 and
epistemological
 perception
 of
 ourselves
 and
 from
 the
 limitations
 that
 come
 from
the
 monocultural,
 disciplinary
 and
 unidimensional
 scope
 of
 the
 traditional
educational
institutions.

The
technology
by
itself
will
not
motivate
or
make
the
difference
in
the
student’s
educational
 process.
 The
 intelligence
 of
 the
 programs,
 processes
 and
 training
 of
teachers
and
tutors,
together
with
the
conviction
of
spreading
the
enthusiasm
and
the
 humanistic
 philosophy
 of
 our
 university,
 will
 mark,
 from
 the
 beginning,
 the
purpose
of
forming
a
new
generation
of
young
people
ready
to
really
transform
the
world
where
we
live.


The
 previous
 statement
 is
 strengthened
 with
 the
 idea
 that
 a
 good
 technique
 and
well
designed
pedagogy
is
critically
important.

Once
the
student
enters
the
platform,
he
will
find
the
following
components
in
the
courses:
 a.
A
handbook
(guide)
with
the
steps
to
follow
in
each
course,
 and
 an
 introductory
 video
 to
 identify
 each
 of
 the
 stages
 to
 complete
the
basic
requirements
of
a
course.
 
 b.
 In
 his
 virtual
 classroom,
 he
 will
 find
 a
 Syllabus
 and
 the
 subjects
‐divided
in
modules‐
to
help
him
follow
the
adequate
 flux
of
each
course.
Subjects
will
contain
specific
information,
 general
bibliography
and
complementary
materials.
 
 c.
 He
 will
 select
 the
 module
 that
 follows
 according
 to
 his
 program
and
find
the
module’s
break
down.
 
 e.
 Students
 can
 access
 modules
 in
 accordance
 to
 their
 personal
rhythm
of
studying.


Here,
we
present
a
brief
example:

Module1)
 Epistemological
 history
 of
 the
 human
 being
 (bibliography,
complementary
materials,
links
and
specific
activities).

Module
 2)
 Neurotheology,
 Neuropolitics
 and
 Neuroeconomy
 (bibliography,
complementary
materials,
links
and
specific
activities)

  19. 19. 18Module
 3)
 Neurosubordination,
 civilization
 and
 stereo‐cognitive
 education
 of
 the
third
 millennium
 (bibliography,
 complementary
 materials,
 links
 and
 specific
activities).


Module
 4)
 Neurorenaissance
 (bibliography,
 complementary
 material,
 links
 and
specific
activities).


Course
structure

 
 



  20. 20. 19
 a. Each
course
will
consist
of
6
modules
delivered
in
6
sessions
(60
 mins)
of
video‐lectures
transmitted
by
the
teacher
and
7
sessions
 (9
 hours)
 of
 multimedia
 activities.
 So,
 each
 module
 will
 be
 delivered
 in
 a
 total
 of
 14
 online
 sessions,
 albeit
 the
 online
 sessions
 in
 which
 students
 interact
 between
 each
 other
 (see
 Technopedagogy
Chart).

 b. The
total
of
online
directed
activities
for
each
module
is
42.

 

  21. 21. 20 
 
 


 a. Each
module
will
be
assessed
with
a
quiz
which
when
approved
opens
 the
next
module
of
the
course.

 d. To
 finish
 each
 module,
 the
 student
 must
 pass
 a
 final
 auto‐delivered
 multiple
choice
quiz
previously
elaborated
by
the
teacher.
 e. The
system
will
randomly
create
different
exams
for
each
student.
 f. Whole
 Life:
 The
 process
 of
 WholeLife
 works
 with
 two
 vertebral
 columns,
one
philosophical
and
another
educational:
 
 I. Inwards
(introspective):
contains
and
holds
the
basis
of
pedagogical,
 institutional,
 organic,
 bioepistemological,
 traditional
 perception
 vs
 introspection
towards
the
individual
and
his
structures,
to
enter
in
a
 constant
 process
 of
 autoevaluation,
real
evolution
 and

 avant‐garde
 growing,
boosted
by
our
online
system
of
knowledge.
 II. Outwards
 (facing
 the
 world):
 supports
 the
 formative
 basis
 ‐ historical,
 dialectic,
 identitary
 and
 critical‐
 present
 in
 the
 design
 of
 the
professional
and
preparatory
studies
of
W1,
W2
and
W3.

The
 first
 approaches
 issues
 around
 the
 educational
 process
 since
 the
transformation
 of
 the
 traditional
 vertical
 relation
 of
 authority
 and
 subordination
between
 the
 teacher
 and
 the
 student
 and
 institution
 versus
 student
 corps,
 to
include,
in
the
renovated
educational
system,
the
horizontal
and
multidisciplinary
relation
 of
 the
 student
 with
 his
 generation
 classmates,
 and
 inclusive,

  22. 22. 21transgenerational
interactions.
In
this
same
manner,
we
question
the
bioepistemic
relation
of
the
renowned
cerebral
lateralization
or
linear
logical
processes
versus
neuronal
 holistic
 processes
 facing
 the
 potential
 capability
 of
 spatial
 and
multidimensional
perception
of
the
traditionally
dormant
right
hemisphere.

The
 second
 point,
 outwards,
 approaches
 the
 alienated
 relationship
 of
 the
individual
 with
 the
 specifically
 religious,
 political
 and
 economic
 cultures
surrounding
the
world.


Here,
 the
 historical‐philosophical
 infrastructure
 of
 our
 educational
 platform
centers
in
the
origin
of
the
human
phenomena
of
subordination,
authority,
power,
affiliation,
 identity,
 stratification,
 discrimination
 and
 conflict.
 The
 purpose
 is
 to
construct
an
initial
self‐knowing
perspective,
upon
which,
the
student
can
develop
a
 critical
 judgment
 in
 the
 process
 of
 acquiring
 knowledge.
 The
 latter
 is
implemented
 through
 the
 technological
 and
 original
 instrumentation
 of
 our
educational
system,
which
is
called
WholeLife.

WholeLife
will
constitute,
for
certain,
the
central
function
of
the
operative
system
that
distinguishes
us,
because
it
is
precisely,
the
system
which
allows

unification
and
synthesis
in
only
one
educational
basis
consisting
in:

 a. General
knowledge
acquisition
 b. Formation
 c. Methodology
 d. Professionalization
 e. Specialization
 
It
 also
 contemplates
 the
 aforementioned
 avant‐garde
 paradigms,
 parallel
 to
 the
vertical
 relation
 with
 the
 teacher
 and
 the
 institution:
 
 the
 horizontal
 interaction
between
 students
 and
 their
 companions,
 and
 finally,
 the
 promotion
 of
interdisciplinarity
 through
 the
 exercise
 of
 multidimensional
 analysis
 of
 the
subjects
of
study
with
a
critical
vision
frame
of
totality.


  23. 23. 22 
 
 
 
 Notwithstanding
 its
 complexity,
 WholeLife
 deploys
 in
 only
 three
 stages:
 
 a. First
 Stage:
 The
 essay
 presentation
 page
 including
 the
 basic
 function
of
the
student´s
personal
data
(photograph
and
general
 biographical
 data),
 the
 thesis
 resuming
 the
 essence
 of
 
 the
 students
 academic
 work,
 a
 space
 containing
 most
 of
 the
 drafts

  24. 24. 23 and
 the
 final
 essay,
 as
 well
 as
 the
 graphic
 and
 audiovisual
 resources
 (photographs,
 diagrams,
 videos)
 which
 
 allows
 the
 exponent
to
enrich
his
presentation.
 
 
 As
soon
as
the
presentation
is
edited,
the
student
can
submit
it
to
 the
 transversal
 scrutiny
 of
 his
 companions,
 under
 the
 option
 of
 personalized
 invitation
 to
a
minimum
 number
of
five
 students,
 or
 the
 option
 of
 opening
 without
 limits,
 that,
 among
 other
 things,
 will
 be
 the
 basis
 for
 the
 parallel
 possibility
 to
 access
 a
 transcultural
experience
of
inter‐universitary
socialization.

 

  25. 25. 24 
 
 b.
 Second
 Stage:
 Discussion
 of
 the
 student’s
 work,
 from
 the
 dialogue
columns
of
argumentation
and
counter
argumentation,
 while
 personally
 "meeting"
 the
 participants
 in
 the
 discussion
 with
 the
 photograph
 and
 biographical
 data,
 offering
 the
 possibility
of
transporting
the
GBWL
experience
to
other
social
 networks,
 if
 students
 decide
 to
 meet
 outside
 the
 closed
 environment
of
their
specific
scholar
environment.

 
 The
 system
 is
 designed
 for
 the
 student
 to
 decide
 which
 personal
 information
 he
 makes
 publicly
 available.
 One
 elemental
 function
 of
 this
 page
 is
 the
 expiration
 date
 of
 the
 discussion,
restricted
to
three
days
from
the
publishing
of
his
 essay.
 Once
 exhausted,
 the
 system
 will
 automatically
 close
 entries,
 and
 proceed
 with
 the
 assessment,
 the
 next
 stage
 in
 the
process.
 
 
 

  26. 26. 25 c.
 Final
stage:
 evaluation
and
 collective
 grading
 of
 the
essay.
 In
 this
 stage
 participants
 must
 deliver
 assessment
 on
 their
 companions
 essay
 in
 no
more
 than
 24
 hours,
explaining
 his
 grade
in
a
special
box
designed
for
this
purpose.
 The
 system
 has
 the
 automatic
 capacity
 to
 average
 the
 assessments
of
all
participants
and
estimate
a
final
grade.
 Once
obtained,
this
result
will
be
averaged
with
the
grade
of
 the
 multiple
 choice
 exam
 and
 the
 partial
 exams
 presented
 after
each
module.
 
 
WholeLife
is
digitally
integrated
by
the
following
components:

 i. One
page
for
essay
publication
with
the
following
fields:
 1. Title
of
the
essay
 2. Thesis
 3. Content
with
a
minimum
and
maximum
of
characters.
 4. Complementary
materials
(Links,
files,
videos).
 5. Essay
 classification
 in
 themes,
 key
 words,
 courses,
 degrees,
etc.
 6. Saving
essay
drafts
for
later
submission.
 7. Publishing.
 
 ii. A
page
for
the
student’s
discussion.
 iii. A
page
where
students
can
grade
an
essay.
 iv. A
space
where
the
student
will
see
the
essays
for
grading
 (includes
 boxes
 to
 determine
 the
 status
 of
 the
 essays
 already
graded
and
the
essays
waiting
to
be
graded),
and
 deadline
warnings.

These
spaces
must
accomplish
the
following
requirements:

 a. Essays
will
have
a
deadline
for
their
online
publication.
 b. In
the
discussion
space,
the
student
has
access
to
the
photograph
of
the
 person
commenting
on
his
essay.
Likewise,
the
one
who
comments
can
 see
 the
 basic
 data
 and
 photograph
 of
 the
 schoolmate
 that
 wrote
 the
 essay.
 c. The
essays
can
be
seen
by
any
member
of
the
educational
community
in
 a
 catalogue
 of
 essays
 with
 diverse
 classifications.
 All
 the
 members
 can

  27. 27. 26 comment
 the
 essays,
 but
 students
 must
 only
 grade
 essays
 assigned
 to
 them.
 d. Essays
can
only
be
graded
by
students
of
advanced
semesters.
 e. 
Each
essay
will
be
graded
by
four
students
randomly.
 f. Comments
 to
 essays
 will
 have
 a
 three
 to
 five
 day
 timeframe
 to
 be
 posted.
 g. Essays
 will
 be
 saved
 in
 the
 student’s
 portfolio,
 after
 the
 process
 is
 finished.
Therefore,
there
are
five
boxes
for
essay
grading
and
status:

 1. PUBLICATION
 2. DISCUSSION
 3. GRADING
 4. FILE
 5. PUBLIC
CATALOG,
where
the
student
finds
the
essays
 for
grading
and
their
status.

 The
 "cafeteria"
 is
 a
 permanent
 space
 for
 social
 interaction
 to
 exchange
 ideas,
propositions
and
impressions.
It
will
be
a
space
to
create
interaction
 with
tutors,
teachers
and
other
GBU
members.
 
 This
 structure
 will
 be
 standardized
 for
 all
 courses,
 anticipating
 that

 audiovisual
 material
 (videos,
 movies,
 presentations,
 conferences,
 didactic
 activities)
 will
 be
 provided
 by
 the
 teacher
 in
 the
 page
 available
 for
 this
 purpose.
 
 Finally,
 we
 highlight
 that
 WholeLife
 concentrates
 90%
 of
 our
 educational
 approach
 because
 it
 entails
 the
 three
 most
 important
 elements
 of
 distinction
 in
 our
 vision:
 multidimensionality,
 trans‐disciplinarity
 and
 multicultural
approach.

  28. 28. 27
 VI About the Academic Professionals
  29. 29. 28

About
the
academic
professionals

In
 GBGU,
 teachers
 are
 responsible
 for
 creating
 the
 fundamental
 contents
 of
 each
course
 to
 be
 delivered
 by
 diverse
 multimedia
 resources.
 Therefore,
 he
 must
provide
 the
 text,
 the
 complementary
 materials
 and
 the
 links,
 as
 well
 as
 the
corresponding
 videos.
 The
 professor
 will
 be
 responsible
 for
 delivering
 the
videotaped
lecture,
and
supplying
the
references
and
orientational
elements
to
be
adopted
by
tutors
for
the
correct
accompaniment
of
the
student.

Our
online
courses
use
prerecorded
video
sessions.
The
teachers
participation
in
front
of
the
camera,
as
well
as
the
quality
of
the
final
edition
of
his
class,
become
the
 critical
 factors
 of
 course
 success.
 Additionally,
 chat
 sessions
 and
 emails
 can
reasonably
replace
delivery
hours
for
the
lecture.
In
these
cases,
the
ability
of
the
professor
 and
 of
 the
 tutors
 to
 communicate
in
 a
written
way
 becomes
 a
 cardinal
point
for
their
assessment.

Following,
 we
 present
 some
 important
 points
 for
 the
 hiring
 and
 periodical
evaluation
of
lecturers:

a.
 Image:
 It
 is
 important
 to
 consider
 that
 grammar
 and
 orthography,
 as
 well
 as

typography
 selection
 and
 presentation
 skills
 will
 be
 crucial
 image
 indicators
 for
lecturers
and
tutors.

b.
 Constant
 Communication:
 It
 is
 important
 for
 teachers
 and
 tutors
 to
 constantly
check
their
email,
to
be
able
to
follow
up
and
support
students
in
a
timely
manner.

c.
 Tracking:
 
 The
 teacher
 must
 look
 after
 the
 organization
 for
 the
 tracking
of
 his
course,
a
vital
characteristic
in
the
online
experience
of
our
lecturers.

d.
 Professional
 design
 of
 materials
 and
 complementary
 contents
 that
 should
 be
standardized:
A
team
of
supportive
professionals
will
be
employed
for
the
design
and
 operation
 of
 the
 materials.
 We
will
 support
teachers
 in
this
matter
to
 assure
they
concentrate
in
the
creation
of
quality
content.

e.
 Interaction
 with
 tutors
 who
 should
 track
 and
 solve
 operative
 problems
 and
questions
 (about
 deadlines,
 electronic
 signature,
 etc.)
 considering
 that
 teachers
must
 not
 spend
 time
 that
 does
 not
 add
 value
 to
 the
 material.
 There
 must
 be
 a
technical
supportive
area
to
solve
connection
and
access
issues.

f.
 FAQ
 –
 Frequently
 Asked
 Questions:
 All
 public
 communications
 –questions
 and
answers‐
 will
 be
 presented
 in
 this
division
 in
an
 accumulative
 format
since
more
than
 one
 student
 can
 have
 the
 same
 doubt,
 creating
 and
 intelligent
 knowledge
base.




  30. 30. 29Teachers
and
tutors

These
 are
 the
 main
 guidelines
 to
 consider
 for
 the
 hiring
 of
 teachers
 and
tutors:

a)
Professional
 formation
 and
 teaching
experience.
We
 must
 assure
that
 teachers
have
 a
 profound
 knowledge
 of
 their
 discipline.
 This
 task
 will
 be
 fulfilled
 by
reviewing
the
teachers
academic
experience,
and
requesting
at
least
two
reference
letters
from
their
previous
institutions.

b)
Direct
and
online
communication
capacity.
We
will
make
sure
that
teachers
are
skilled
in
the
use
of
main
digital
tools
for
direct
communication
with
his
students.
We
will
test
teachers
in
three
different
mock‐up
lecture
sessions.


c)
Grammar
and
orthography
are
basic
skills
for
the
hiring
of
teachers
and
tutors.

d)
 Constant
 communication.
 As
 mentioned
 above,
 teachers
 and
 tutors
 must
continually
check
their
emails
and
forum
participation.

e)
The
system
should
provide
a
tool
to
score
teacher
activities.


Tutor
Coordinators:

1. Coordinators
 are
 preferably
 PhDs
 with
 high
 proficiency
 in
 the
 disciplines
 they
 coordinate,
 and
 are
 involved
 in
 the
 subjects
 main
 discussions.
 They
 must
 prove
 sufficient
 experience
 as
 tutor
 coordinators
 in
 their
 previous
 engagements.
2. Coordinators
will
supervise
the
tutors’
work.
3. Each
coordinator
will
be
responsible
for
15
tutors
within
their
discipline.
4. The
 coordinator
 is
 the
 link
 between
 the
 teacher,
 the
 tutors
 and
 the
 technicians
that
give
technical
support
to
the
platform.
5. The
 coordinators
 supervise
 materials
 prepared
 by
 teachers
 previous
 to

 delivery,
 caring
 that
 they
 fulfill
 the
 necessary
 requirements
 of
 quality
 and

 institutional
and
technical
specifications.
6. The
 coordinators
 are
 responsible
 for
 the
 elaboration
 of
 the
 partial
 module
 assessments
of
the
courses
and
the
final
multiple
choice
assessment.
Tutors:

They
should
track
and
solve
operative
questions
and
problems.

Digital
designers:

They
are
responsible
for
the
standardized
professional
design
of
the
material
and
complementary
contents.
  31. 31. 30
 VII THE MODULES
  32. 32. 31


The
Modules

The
 courses
 are
 structured
 in
 different
 modules.
 Each
 one
 of
 them
 consists
 in
different
 working
 materials,
 activities,
 support
 activities,
 self‐assessment,
 partial
and
final
assessments,
in
such
a
way,
that
each
student
studies
at
his
own
rhythm,
advised
 by
 the
 tutor,
 whom
 can
 suggest
 an
 order
 and
 an
 ideal
 length
 
 for
 each
process.

At
the
end
of
the
course,
it
will
be
important
to
gather
opinions
about
the
course
format
and
user
experience
to
enters
into
process
of
continuous
improvement.


In
each
module,
students
will
access
the
following
resources:

 • Basic
material
for
reading,
study
and
practice.
 • Discussion
Forum
 • FAQ
(Frequently
Asked
Questions)
 • Library
 • Glossary
 • Tutor
Communication
 • Discussion
Panel
 • Readings
and
complementary
activities
 • Self‐assessment
and
autodidactic
exercises



  33. 33. 32
 VIII SYNTHESIS
  34. 34. 33

Synthesis,
as
a
conclusion
on
the
structure
of
the
course

The
design
of
each
one
of
the
online
courses
will
require
the
active
participation
of
a
 professional
 group
 of
 technicians
 to
 support
 the
 instructor
 in
 the
 creation
 of
 a
technologically
viable,
visually
attractive
and
pedagogically
coherent
course.

A
 16
 week
 course
 can
 include
 one
 or
 more
 weekly
 activities
 from
 the
 following
pool
of
examples:

 . 
Analysis
 of
 a
 series
 of
 readings
 (text
 book
 and
 supportive
 materials)
 . 
Reviewing
of
presentations,
videos
and
links.
 . 
Participation
in
forum,
chats,
questionnaires,
WholeLife,
etc.
 . 
Discussion
 boards
 for
 themes
 and
 cases
 that
 require
 individual
 or
 collective
 virtual
 investigation
 within
 a
 restricted
 length
 of
 time.
 . 
Solving
a
test
for
each
module
concerning
assigned
readings.



  35. 35. 34
STUDENT
MANUAL
GIORDANO
BRUNO
UNIVERSITY

Presentation

The
 present
 manual
 is
 for
 you,
 student
 of
 the
 Giordano
 Bruno
 University.
 It
 is
 a
general
 introduction,
 in
 seven
 points,
 to
 your
 participation
 in
 your
 GBU
 virtual
university.
Likewise,
it
will
help
you
understand
the
main
ideas
of
our
philosophy,
pedagogy,
 online
 navigation
 in
 your
 virtual
 campus,
 local
 and
 international
academic
tutoring
and
above
all,
your
active
participation
in
our
educational
social
network:
 the
 WholeLife
 Experience,
 one
 of
 the
 most
 innovative
 and
 important
components
of
your
University.

We
summarize
the
most
relevant
aspects
of
your
online
life
in
GBU
in
seven
main
chapters:

 1. Introduction.
 Synthesis
 of
the
 philosophy
and
emphasis
of
 our
educational
 system.

 2. Our
 schools,
 Programs
 of
 study,
 Techno‐pedagogical
 model
 and
 the
 standard
instructional
structure
of
our
academic
contents.


 3. Our
 Web‐Site,
 Login
 platform,
 critical
 navigation
 into
 your
 online
 courses,
 Contact
with
Tutors
and
Academic
advisors,
WholeLife
experience
and
the

 25
steps
to
pursue
and
approve
a
prototipical
GBU
course.

 4. Your
“Generation”
and
our
Global
Educational
Social
Network.


 5. The
Club
of
Budapest
and
the
CAS
(Center
for
Advanced
Studies)

 6. Local
and
International
Tutoring.

 7. Towards
the
Future.

 

Introduction.

The
Giordano
Bruno
Online
University
was
created
with
the
purpose
of
offering
a
revolutionary
educational
model,
accessible
to
practically
any
person
in
the
world,
interested
and
qualified
to
complete
a
degree
in
Higher
Education.

Ours
is
a
hybrid
educational
system
with
profound
online
work
combined
with
the
assistance
 of
 physical
 high
 school
 institutions
 which
 will,
 not
 only
 facilitate
 a
physical
point
of
reference,
tutorship
and
permanent
consulting,
but
will
also
grant
students
 the
 possibility
 of
 a
 dual
 accreditation
 (national
 and
 international)
 and
acquisition
of

the
best
professional
skills
for
employability.



  36. 36. 35

Our
 philosophy
 is
 based
 on
 the
 cutting
 edge
 idea
 of
 helping
 our
 students
understand
the
world
we
live
in.
We
are
committed
to
create
in
them
the
seed
of
a
critical,
non‐subordinate
and
innovative
mind‐frame
to
question
civilization
in
its
structural
 organization
 and
 its
 particular
 process
 of
 acquisition
 of
 knowledge,
regardless
of
the
student’s
area
of
specialization.





This
is
why
all
of
our
programs
of
study
require
as
part
of
the
General
Education
mandatory
courses
within
the
first
three
trimester,
the
World
1,
World
2
&
World
3
courses,
which
‐in
essence‐
teach
the
student
the
origin
of
our
civilization
–past‐,
the
 state
 of
 our
 world
 today
 –present‐,
 and
 the
 possible
 outcomes
 and
transformational
opportunities
for
the
future.


1.

Pedagogy

Our
model
of
transmission
and
acquisition
of
knowledge
is
a
result
of
a
serious
and
current
educational
trends
review,
which
is
built
over
three
fundamental
pillars:

 a. Transcultural
(cross‐cultural)
education.
 b. Interdisciplinary
Education
 c. Holistic
Vision
(stereo‐cognition).

Basically,
 the
 first
one
promotes
the
plurality
and
 openness
of
 diverging
 thought,
reflected
in
the
cultural
differences
that
exist
in
our
world.


Here,
 the
 teaching
 of
 openness,
 tolerance,
otherness
 and
 the
 right
 to
be
different
are
essential.

Therefore,
as
a
student,
your
first
experience
is
to
form
part
of
a
multicultural
and
multidisciplinary
 group
 ‐My
 Generation‐
 that
 will
 constitute
 your
 generation
 ‐21
people‐
 from
 all
 the
 available
 regions
 of
 the
 world.
 This
 group
 will
 interact
 with
you
through
your
college.
They
are
also
your
Graduation
Generation.
They
will
be
your
 friends
 and
 students
 from
 other
 programs,
 cities
 and
 backgrounds
 you
 can
consult.
 You
 will
 also
 meet
 with
 your
 classmates,
 with
 whom
 you
 will
 work
 all
along
your
courses.
Each
time
you
choose
a
course,
you
will
have
the
opportunity
to
meet
new
classmates.
GBU
programs
will
give
you
the
experience
to
create
new
international
and
intercultural
relationships
with
each
course
you
take.


Interdisciplinary
 education
 is
 based
 on
 the
 idea
 of
 overstep
 limitations
 of
education
constrained
to
the
frame
of
disciplinary
specialization,
and
provide
you
with
an
amplified
vision
of
reality
that
aims
to
holistic
understanding
of
it,
that,
by
definition,
is
not
isolated
but
forms
part
of
a
larger
system.


The
group
work
 generated
 within
“the
WholeLife
 Experience”
will
 allow
 you,
 not
only
 to
bring
 forward
 and
 put
 into
practice
and
 share
your
 personal
criteria
 and
acquired
knowledge,
but
also
to
participate
in
a
serious
dialogue
and
constructive

  37. 37. 36criticism
 of
 our
 environment
 and
 your
 personal
 enrichment
 implicit
 from
teamwork
which
this
pedagogical
technique
especially
fosters.


Stereo­cognition.

As
 the
 human
 being
 has
 two
 eyes
 to
 see
 in
 stereoscope,
 two
 ears
 to
 listen
 in
stereophony,
he
also
has
two
brain
hemispheres
that
interact
among
them
through
the
callous
body
to
make
possible
the
different
biological
functions,
some
of
logical
nature
 –linear‐
 and
 other
 of
 perception
 and
 spatial
 characteristics,
 such
 as
 the
necessary
imagination
to
create
an
idea
in
3D
like
architecture,
literature
or
music.

Our
educational
emphasis
is
placed
on
developing
this
capacity
in
our
students;
to
increase
their
understanding
not
only
of
the
courses
of
study
in
their
uniqueness,
but
in
the
context
of
the
totality
of
reality
and
the
relationships
between
its
parts.

So,
 the
 understanding
of
 the
 past,
the
 present
and
 the
future
possibilities
for
 our
world
‐World
1,
World
2
and
World
3‐,
the
non‐subordination
to
any
preconceived
truth,
the
critical
attitude
in
face
of
the
acquisition
of
knowledge,
crossculturality,
transdisciplinarity,
 and
 stereo‐cognition
 approaches
 implicit
 in
 our
 didactical
processes
 are,
 in
 sum,
 the
 formative
 guidelines
 that
 distinguish
 the
 Giordano
Bruno
University.




2­Our
Schools

Giordano
 Bruno
 University
 has
 twenty
 nine
 academic
 programs
 (Bachelor’s,
Master’s
and
Doctorate),
courses
and
certificates
delivered
within
our
five
Schools.

You
 can
 consult
 our
 schools
 and
 their
 constantly
 growing
 programs’
 offer
 in
our
Website:
http://www.gbgu.org


Bachelors
 and
 Masters
 are
 organized
 in
 General
 Education
 courses,
 Blocks
 of
mandatory
courses
for
the
first,
second
and
third
year
and
Elective
Courses.
They
are
taught
by
trimesters
in
which
you
can
register
up
to
three
regular
courses
per
term.

Our
 Institute
 of
 Continuing
 Education
 offers
 unique
 courses
 of
 different
 current
topics,
with
potential
credit
towards
our
accredited
degrees
and
certificates.

You
 may
 choose
 your
 preferred
 program
of
 study
after
 posting
 your
exam
 in
our
application
menu,
and,
as
you
enroll
as
a
GBU
student,
you
will
have
the
possibility
to
choose
from
the
mandatory
and
elective
courses
of
your
program.


Our
 tutors
 and
 mentors
 will
 optionally
 help
 you
 with
 a
 basic
 vocational
 exam
recognizing
 your
 skills
 and
 suitable
 and
 personal
 choice
 of
 study,
 as
 our
 system
allows
you
to
tailor
your
academic
track
with
a
variety
of
minors
and
majors.




  38. 38. 37
3.
Our
techno­pedagogical
model.

Each
 course
 of
 study
 is
 structured
 in
 six
 modules,
 outlined
 in
 the
 syllabus,
 that
contains
six
videolectures,
its
bibliography,
online
links,
activities,
practical
cases,
quizzes
and
a
Bank
of
Topics
for
essays.


At
 the
 completion
 of
 the
 six
 modules,
 there
 will
 be
 a
 Final
 exam
 and
 the
requirement
 to
 write
 an
 essay
 which
 encourages
 your
 interaction
 through
 with
your
generation.

In
the
space
called
“WholeLife”,
you
will
work
together
with
your
generation
and
“grade”
 two
 essays
 of
 your
 classmates
‐the
system
 will
randomly
select
them
for
you‐,
through
a
“star
rating”
tool.
These
grades
will
be
verified
by
the
local
tutor
in
your
geographical
area.


It
 is
 important
 to
 point
 out
 that,
 even
 if
 you
 could
 have
 access
 to
 external
 help
throughout
 your
 academic
 cycle
 in
 essays
 and
 examinations,
 it
 is
 highly
recommended
 that
 you
 rely
 on
 your
 personal
 effort
 and
 pedagogical
 process
 to
truly
 acquire
 scientific
 knowledge.
 For
 graduation
 and
 obtaining
 of
 the
professional
 degree,
 you
 must
 be
aware
 that
 the
final
 examination
is
 NOT
 online,
but
in
a
controlled
physical
environment.



4.
Our
Web­site,
login
platform
&
the
Basic
Elements
for
Navigation.


In
 the
 section
 of
 our
 website
 Pre‐login,
 you
 will
 find
 general
 information
 about
GBU
 totally
 open
 to
 the
 public.
 In
 a
 subsection
 of
 the
 pre‐login
 you
 will
 find
 a
questionnaire
and
an
application
form
for
enrollment
with
all
the
necessary
steps
for
 this
 process.
 Submit
 transcripts
 of
 your
 High
 School
 records
 or
 University
credits,
if
any.
You
will
receive
an
email
answer
of
acceptance
with
your
personal
password
or
rejection
in
the
next
48
hours.
In
case
of
rejection,
an
explanation
and
instructions
for
a
second
application
will
be
included.


Once
 officially
 accepted
 you
 will
 have
 access
 to
 the
 Login
 section
 through
 your
personal
 password.
 The
 first
 element
 you
 will
 see
 in
 this
 section
 is
 a
 Welcome
video
from
our
Chancellor,
Professor
Ervin
Laszlo.

Here
 you
 will
 be
 able
 to
 select
 your
 courses
 and
 get
 acquainted
 with
 your
generation’s
 fellow
 students,
 which
 will
 constitute
 the
 basis
 for
 your
 team
 work
and
a
permanent
source
of
consultation.


5.

Brief
and
easy
application
for
admission:

1.
‐
After
you
power
up
your
computer,
enter
our
Website:
http://www.gbgu.org
2.
 
If
 you
 have
not
 read
 the
 general
information
about
the
university,
 its
 mission,
the
programs
and
the
courses,
we
invite
you
to
take
a
closer
look.
3.

Fill
out
the
application
form
and
send
it
to
the
university.

  39. 39. 384.

Submit
transcripts:
high
school
record
and
college/university
credits.
5.
 6.
 
Wait
 for
 the
 institutional
 response
 and
 your
 admission
 to
 the
 university.
Upon
admission,
you
will
be
issued
your
student
ID
and
password.

UPON
ADMISSION:

7.
 YOU
 ARE
 NOW
 IN
 THE
 LOGIN
 PAGE,
 ACCESIBLE
 ONLY
 TO
 REGISTERED
STUDENTS.
 THIS
 IS
 YOUR
 VIRTUAL
 CAMPUS.
 Through
 YOUR
 GBU
 DASHBOARD,
ON
THE
UPPER
PART
OF
THE
SCREEN
YOU
HAVE
A
SELECTION
OF
TABS
WHERE
YOU
WILL
FIND
EVERYTHING
YOU
NEED
TO
COMPLETE
YOUR
ACADEMIC
CYCLE.

8.

Once
you
are
officially
admitted
to
your
program,
you
may
register
for
3
courses
PER
TERM
going
to
“My
Student
Page”
in
the
Student
Information
System.

9.

After
registration,
proceed
to
the
financial
section
and
pay
for
your
selection
of
courses.
 In
 “My
 Student
 Page”
 there
 is
 a
 link
 to
 “My
 Financial
 Account”.
You
 will
have
clear
instructions
for
your
payment
options
in
that
link.


10.
 Check
 your
 academic
 and
 financial
 page
 to
 verify
 that
 all
 the
 information
 is
accurate.
(My
Student
Page
and
My
Financial
Account).

11.
 Proceed
 to
 the
 virtual
 campus
 and
 greet
 your
 cohort
 in
 the
 “My
 Generation”
tab.
 
This
 is
 the
 group
 you
 will
 be
 interacting
 with
 throughout
 your
 selected
courses
per
term.

12.
 For
 each
 course,
 complete
 the
 6
 modules
 ‐six
 videolectures,
 its
 bibliography,
online
 links,
 activities,
 practical
 cases,
 quizzes
 and
 the
 writing
 and
 editing
 of
 an
Essay.

The
link
within
“My
Courses”
section
on
the
left
menu
“How
to
Navigate”
is
an
 explanation
 of
 how
 to
 navigate
 throughout
 your
 course.
 Also,
 you
 will
 have
tutors
to
assist
you
in
every
course.
The
explanation
on
how
to
contact
them
will
be
explained
further
down
in
this
manual.

13.
At
the
end
of
each
term,
obtain
your
final
grades
and
then
proceed
to
register
for
 the
 next
 term.
You
 may
 see
 your
 grades
 in
 each
 course
 and
 have
 a
 general
transcript
 within
 the
 “Student
 Page”.
 To
 enroll
 in
 new
 courses
 each
 time,
 just
repeat
the
process.


6.
Course
Structure

It
is
very
important
to
know
that
each
module
is
generally
structured
in
the
same
format,
 to
 allow
 a
 congruent
 flow
 of
 your
work
 throughout
 your
 academic
 cycle.
These
are
its
parts:

 1. Video
lecture
 2. Reading
Material
and
bibliography
 3. Online
Activities
and
Links
 4. Partial
Quiz
(multiple
option,
fulfill
the
paragraph,
etc.)
 5. Practical
and
updated
Cases.

  40. 40. 39 6. Final
Quiz
 7. Essay
and
grading
process.
The
“Whole
Life”
experience.


7.
General
Recommendations.

The
video
lecture
is
an
introduction
given
by
the
professor
to
the
topic
of
study.
.
We
recommend
you
to
pay
special
attention
to
the
professor
and
remind
you
that
you
can
see
this
video
as
many
times
as
necessary
to
gain
deeper
understanding.


We
 also
 recommend
 you
 to
 write
 personal
 notes
 while
 going
 through
 your
bibliography
and
reading
materials,
not
only
trying
to
summarize
the
key
ideas
of
the
texts,
but
also
‐and
especially‐
your
pertinent
commentaries,
reflections,
ideas,
refutations
 and
 debatable
 issues
 written
 in
 the
 text,
 that
 will
 later
 on
 help
 you
construct
the
thesis
and
argumentation
of
your
essay.



In
this
chapter,
particularly
recommended,
is
to
try
out
a
comparative
analysis
and
with
your
own
experience
and
knowledge
to
form
a
personal
and
critical
opinion
towards
 the
 relevant
 subjects
 of
the
 course
at
 hand.
 We
 highly
encourage
 you
 to
indulge
your
personal
research
concerns.


The
Online
 Activities
and
 Links
must
 also
 be
studied
 taking
 notes
 of
the
 relevant
themes,
as
well
as
your
critical
reaction
to
them,
in
order
to
continue
enriching
the
formation
of
criteria
in
conjunction
with
the
comparative
analysis
of
the
different
materials.

The
examination
‐multiple
options,
matching
of
columns,
fill
the
missing
words,
etc
should
 be
 covered
 in
 due
 form
 and
 time
 in
 the
 corresponding
 section.
 We
recommend
 you
 take
 this
 examination
 when
 you
 feel
 self‐confident
 with
 your
capacity
to
master
the
study
material
within
your
course.

Once
you
have
completed
the
six
modules,
in
each
of
its
parts,
you
may
proceed
to
interact
 with
 your
 classmates
 (21
 generational
 members)
 and
 construct
 a
 final
essay
 to
 be
 developed
 in
 a
 dialogue‐fostering
 mode
 within
 the
 “Agora”
 space
designed
for
this
specific
function.

The
 Course
 Head,
 besides
 specifying
 the
 specific
 subjects
 for
 the
 essay
 and
 the
thesis
to
prove
or
disapprove,
will
also
specify
the
diverse
components
of
the
latter
that
 in
 consensus,
 and
 in
 agreement
 with
 the
interests
 of
the
 group,
the
 students
must
develop.

Peer
review
will
be
confirmed
or
modified
by
the
local
tutor
(within
the
Associate
Licensee)
of
our
institution.

It
 is
 important
 to
 note
 that
 the
 essay
 must
 contain
 and
 reflect
 four
 fundamental
virtues
of
the
student’s
knowledge
about
the
subject:

 a. Mastery
of
the
academic
content
of
the
course
 b. Critical
and
comparative
analysis
capacity

  41. 41. 40 c. Openness
to
cross‐cultural
interaction
 d. Interdisciplinary
contribution
to
the
subject
in
development



Once
 the
 essay
 is
 completed
 by
 the
 group,
 there
 will
 be
 a
 collective
 grading
 to
average
 this
 grade
 with
 your
 other
 grades
 within
 the
 modules.
 This
 will
 provide
you
the
final
grade
to
the
course.


8.
Your
Generation

Your
 generation
 constitutes
 your
 group
 of
 team‐mates
 of
 different
 nationalities
and
disciplines.
They
will
accompany
you
throughout
your
academic
three
month
cycle
in
the
online
activities
–blogs,
chats,
etc.‐
and
discussions
and
writing
of
the
essays.
 
 You
 will
 have
 the
 opportunity
 to
 meet
 many
 new
 classmates
 and
 GBU
students
as
you
go
forward
to
your
courses.

This
group
dynamics
intends
to
create
long
lasting
international,
inter‐cultural
and
trans‐disciplinary
 bonds,
 which
 enrich
 the
 process
 of
 knowledge
 acquisition
 and
fortify
 the
 exercise
 of
 teamwork,
 dialogue,
 deliberation
 and
 academic
 debate
converging
the
different
perspectives
of
the
group
members.


We
 recommend
 you
 to
 establish
 contact
 with
 your
 classmates
 as
 soon
 as
 you
enroll,
 so
 that
 your
 relationships
will
 help
you
create
 mutual
 support,
a
constant
consulting
blog,
friendships
and
teamwork.

The
 system
 is
 designed
 to
 establish
 contact
 within
 the
 GBU
 environment
 or
through
 diverse
 social
 networking
 tools
 such
 as
 Facebook,
 Twitter,
 MSN
Messenger,
MySpace,
etc.

Once
a
year,
GBU
will
organize
events
to
foster
physical
encounters
where
you
can
meet
 your
 fellow
 classmates
 and
 establish
 conversation
 about
 special
 GBGU
projects
for
extra
credits
towards
your
programs.


9.
The
Club
of
Budapest

The
 new
 pedagogy
 that
 inspired
 the
 creation
 of
 Giordano
 Bruno
 GlobalShift
University
found
in
The
Club
of
Budapest,
its
suitable
academic
and
philosophical
associate,
for
their
shared
academic,
pedagogical
and
philosophical
principles
and
goals.
 As
 a
 result,
 they
 submitted
 as
 their
 joint
 purpose
 to
 provide
 the
 students
 a
humanistic,
 universal
 and
 holistic
 vision,
 as
 the
 foundational
 basis
 of
 a
 new
consciousness
to
create
a
critical
mind
frame
that
will
distinguish
them.
To
achieve
this,
 The
 Club
 of
 Budapest
 fully
 participates
 in
 the
 development
 and
 counseling
 of
our
GBU
academic
programs
and
is
committed
to
its
future
teaching.


The
 Club
 of
 Budapest
 is
 an
 informal
 international
 association
 dedicated
 to
developing
 a
 new
 way
 of
 thinking
 and
 ethics
 that
 will
 help
 resolve
 the
 social,
political,
 economic,
 and
 ecological
 challenges
 of
 the
 21st
 century.
 With
 its
 list
 of
internationally
renowned
members,
the
Club
initiates
a
dialogue
between
different

  42. 42. 41belief
 systems
 and
 world
 views
 in
 order
 to
 co‐create
 and
 develop
 effective
strategies
for
responsible
and
sustainable
action
with
a
global
focus.


The
idea
of
the
Club
of
Budapest
was
developed
in
1978
in
a
discussion
between
Aurelio
Peccei,
founder
and
first
president
of
the
Club
of
Rome,
and
Ervin
Laszlo,
systems
philosopher
and
also
member
of
the
Club
of
Rome
at
that
time.
They
were
convinced
 that
 the
 enormous
 challenges
 to
 humanity
 can
 only
 be
 dealt
 with
through
the
development
of
a
cultural
and
cosmopolitan
consciousness.
Based
on
these
ideas,
the
Club
of
Budapest
was
founded
by
Dr.
Laszlo
in
1993.
The
founding
city
 and
 namesake
 of
 the
 Club
 lies
 at
 the
heart
 of
 Europe
 and
 is
 spread
 out
 over
both
banks
of
the
Danube
River.
The
successful
merging
of
the
two
cities
Buda
and
Pest
 is
 achieved
 and
 symbolized
 by
 the
 famous
 Chain
 Bridge,
 which,
metaphorically
 represents
 
 our
 ambition
 to
 build
 bridges
 between
 generations,
disciplines
 and
 cultures.
 Therefore,
 it
 was
 selected
 as
 the
 logo
 and
 signet
 of
 the
Club.
 The
 main
 essence
 of
 the
 global
 efforts
 lies
 in
 the
 initiation
 of
 this
multicultural
and
transgenerational
dialogue.


The
Mission
of
the
Club
of
Budapest
is
to
be
a
catalyst
for
the
transformation
to
a
sustainable
world
through:

 • Promoting
the
emergence
of
planetary
consciousness

 • Interconnecting
generations
and
cultures

 • Integrating
spirituality,
science,
and
arts

 • Fostering
learning
communities
worldwide


The
 philosophy
 of
 the
 Club
 of
 Budapest
 is
 based
 on
 the
 conviction
 that
 the
enormous
 challenges
 that
 humanity
 is
 currently
 facing
 can
 only
 be
 overcome
through
the
development
of
a
global
cultural
consciousness.
The
view
of
the
Club
of
Budapest
is
focused
on
a
cultural
consciousness
with
a
global
perspective.
Like
Greenpeace
 fights
 for
 ecological
 issues,
 UNICEF
 for
 children,
 and
 Amnesty
International
 for
 human
 rights,
 the
 Club
 of
 Budapest
 stands
 for
 global
consciousness.
 The
 Club
 perceives
 itself
 as
 a
 builder
 of
 bridges
 between
 science
and
 art,
 ethics
 and
 economy,
 between
 cognition
 and
 action,
 between
 old
 and
young,
as
well
as
between
the
different
cultures
of
the
world.


10.

TUTORING

Student
tutoring
will
be
delivered
in
two
formats:

Local
 tutorship
 –
 provided
 by
 the
 closest
 Associate
 Licensee.
 The
 contact
information
you
will
find
it
in
the
general
information
tab
for
each
course.

Any
 query
 related
 to
 the
 general
 subjects
 of
 the
 course,
 such
 as
 methodology,
instructions
and
navigational
processes
will
be
solved
by
this
local
tutoring
option.

More
specialized
queries
in
academic
or
administrative
matters
will
be
directed
to
the
“Master
Tutors”,
specialized
subject
experts
for
each
school,
who
will
be
based
in
Washington.

  43. 43. 42
You
will
also
find
this
information
in
the
General
Information
page
of
your
course
at
hand.


11.
TOWARDS
THE
FUTURE

It
is
noteworthy
to
say
that
the
flow
of
the
process
here
presented
‐step
by
step‐,
constitutes,
in
a
way,
a
certain
guideline
for
each
of
your
courses.
By
going
through
a
course
you
will
be
familiar
with
GBU
navigation
process
and
able
to
concentrate
on
achieving
the
acquisition
of
knowledge
and
the
professional
skills
necessary
for
your
professional
activity.


We
 invite
 you
 to
start
you
 educational
 adventure
 in
your
future
Alma
Mater,
 The
Giordano
Bruno
University.

Finally
we
proceed
to
create
the
prototype
course
of
study
(
World
I
)
to
be
tested
by
what
we
called
our
GBGU
first
generation.

http://www.gbgu.org/world/worldI/


Conclusion:

The
two
and
a
half
years
of
development
of

our
bioepistemological
research
and
deconstructivist

acquisition
of

the
ontological,
epistemological
and
axiological
knowledge
of
our
civilization

and
the
instructional
design

of
our
pedagogical
model
of
nonsubordinative,
interculturalcultural,
interdisciplinary
and
sterecognitive
of
our
GBGU
technopedagogy
platform,
built,
in
its
holistic
integration,
a
new
and
peculiar
teaching
and
learning
virtual
and
global
oriented
environment,
that,

for
its
originality,
can
be
considered
an
intellectual
property
of
our

Giordano
Bruno
GlobalShift
Institution.



Bibliography

Braudel,
Fernand,
1995,
A
history
of
civilizations.
NY:
Penguin
Books,
pp.
600.

Elías,
Norbert,
1987,
El
proceso
de
la
civilización:
investigaciones
sociogenéticas
y
psicogenéticas.
Madrid:
FCE,
pp.
581.

Gibbons,
Michael,
Limoges,
Camilla,
Nowotny,
Helga,
Schwartzaman,
Simon,
Scott,
Peter
u
Trow,
Martin
(1997).
La
nueva
producción
del
Conocimiento.
La
dinámica
de
la
ciencia
y
la
investigación
en
las
sociedades
contemporáneas.
Barcelona:
Pomares‐Corredor.

Janes,
Julian,
1990
(1976),
The
origin
of
Consciousness
in
the
break­down
of
the
bicameral
mind.
USA:
Mariner
Books,
pp.
475.


  44. 44. 43Wolf
Eric
R.,
2001,
Pathways
of
power
:
building
an
anthropology
of
the
modern
world.
Berkeley:
University
of
California
Press,
pp.
463.

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐.
1999,
Envisioning
power:
ideologies
of
dominance
and
crisis.
Berkeley:
University
of
California
Press,
pp.
339.

‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐,
1982.
Europe
and
the
people
without
history.
Berkeley:
University
of
California
Press,
pp.
503.



×