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Finding Your Voice By William Faus
 

Finding Your Voice By William Faus

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    Finding Your Voice By William Faus Finding Your Voice By William Faus Presentation Transcript

    • Changemaker Training Saturday, December 10, 2011 Hosted by Greenbelt Alliance
    • William Faus
      • Happily married for 33 years
      • Involved with planning issues for 38 years
      • Attended Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo
      • Completed graduate studies at SJSU
      • This is my 3 rd year in retirement
      • I currently dedicate most my time to a number of non-profits, volunteer work, gardening, and cooking for my beautiful wife
    • How you can make a difference
      • Know & study your specific issue(s)
      • Carefully define the specific action(s) you want to happen
      • Communicate your concerns
    • Know & Study your issue(s)
      • Most projects have two distinct components in the approval process:
        • Environmental review (CEQA)
        • Project characteristics & scope
    • Environmental Review Under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)
      • In-depth analysis of potential impacts
      • Applied Mitigation Measures will lessen potential impacts
      • Do the recommended Mitigation Measures address the potential impacts
      • Are project alternatives [ found within an EIR ] sufficiently vetted
    • Project characteristics & scope
      • Development plans describe the proposal
      • Plans can be:
        • Drawings [ blue prints ]
        • Descriptive narrative
    • The final project
      • Will be a product of:
        • Approved development plans
        • Adopted Mitigation Measures
        • Conditions added on by:
          • Recommending body
          • Approval body
    • Define the action you want
      • GOOD:
        • Carefully define your issues & concerns
        • Communicate your issues & concerns
          • This sets up vulnerable ownership , as the outcome is strongly influenced by others
    • Define the action you want
      • BETTER:
        • Carefully define your issues & concerns
        • Outline potential solutions and/or options
        • Communicate your issues & concerns
          • This sets up shared ownership , where the outcome is influenced by suggested solutions
    • Define the action you want
      • BEST:
        • Carefully define your issues & concerns
        • Outline potential solutions and/or options
        • Support your recommendations with reasons and findings
        • Communicate your issues & concerns
          • This takes ownership , where the potential outcome is strongly influenced by you
    • Communicate your concerns
      • This is the easy part and can be transmitted in many forms to the recommending and/or approval bodies
        • Prior to project approval - express your concerns
        • During project approval - express your concerns
    • The more ways you communicate your message - the better
      • Verbal, person-to-person { by far the best way !}
      • Phone call
      • Text message
      • E-mail
      • Submit a detailed letter of concern
      • Fax
      • Letter(s) to the local newspaper editor
      • Express your concerns at the public hearing(s)
    • Communication – cont.
      • Get community groups to support your position …
        • Chamber of Commerce
        • Business associations
        • Home-owner’s association
        • Environmental groups
        • Neighborhood group
    • Be even more proactive …
      • Prior to the public hearings:
        • Speak to agency staff in charge of environmental review
        • Speak to agency staff in charge of the project review and/or staff report recommendation
          • Speak to individuals in charge of specific sections of the report:
            • Traffic Engineer
            • Fire safety
            • Etc. etc.
    • Your public Standing
      • For a Resident
        • Number of years as a local resident
        • Number of years as a property owner
        • Proximity to the project site
      • For a Business owner
        • Number of years as a local business owner
        • Number of local people your business employed
        • Annual tax dollars generated
        • Proximity to the project site
    • Who approved that?
      • There are typically five key groups involved in a project decision:
        • Policy Planners
        • City Planners
        • Project Design Planners
        • Environmental Planners
        • Special Interest Planners
    • Those involved:
      • Policy Planners
        • City Council, Board of Supervisors, etc.
        • Planning Commission
        • Specific area boards [ ABAG, MTC, SCVWD ]
        • LAFCO [ Local Agency Formation Commission ]
      • City Planners
        • Staff planners, management, directors
    • Those involved:
      • Project Design Planners
        • Architects, Engineers, Design Planners, etc.
      • Environmental Planners
        • CEQA consultants, specialists [ i.e. Traffic ]
      • Special Interest Planners
        • Environmental interests [ i.e. Sierra Club, Greenbelt ]
        • Business interests [ i.e. Chamber of Commerce ]