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Why is country ownership an important issue for South Africa to address?    <ul><ul><li>Selected examples </li></ul></ul>S...
What do we mean by country ownership?    Accountability Political leadership / stewardship Capabilities Institutional owne...
What is country ownership?   SOURCE: HIV/ AIDS stakeholder interviews “ ” Leadership across all activities with Government...
Working definition of country ownership     Ownership criteria Description <ul><ul><li>Local institutions (e.g., Governmen...
Political ownership/stewardship – what does great look like?   Description <ul><ul><li>A significant and stable resource i...
Institutional and community ownership – what does great look like?   SOURCE:  Draws upon concepts from:  “Paris Declaratio...
Capabilities – what does great look like?   SOURCE:  Draws upon concepts from:  “Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness,” ...
Accountability – what does great look like?   4 Mechanisms for input and feedback are effective Description <ul><ul><li>Th...
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Country ownership assessment

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Transcript of "Country ownership assessment"

  1. 1. Why is country ownership an important issue for South Africa to address? <ul><ul><li>Selected examples </li></ul></ul>SOURCE: Botswana HIV/AIDS response stakeholder interviews; team analysis ‘ Effective stewardship will help eliminate duplication of efforts and address gaps’ ‘ Effective accountability will keep us focussed on delivering impact and not performing activities’ ‘ All the four dimensions together – political ownership/stewardship, institutional and community ownership, capabilities and accountability ensure a sustainable response’ ‘ A vibrant civil society will play a pivotal role in driving government accountability’ ‘’ Country ownership ensures we have, or are effectively building, the capabilities needed to deliver across the entire response’ ‘ As donors, we want to provide targeted and time-bound support and not run parallel health systems’ ‘ Country ownership is a key element of the Paris Declaration that we signed’ Stated country and donor priority Improves programme efficiency and effectiveness Promotes sovereignty and political accountability Enables sustainability
  2. 2. What do we mean by country ownership? Accountability Political leadership / stewardship Capabilities Institutional ownership “ ” Ability to execute national strategies according to plan, and innovating where necessary
  3. 3. What is country ownership? SOURCE: HIV/ AIDS stakeholder interviews “ ” Leadership across all activities with Government as the first amongst equals “ ” A government driven agenda with multi-stakeholder partners contributing to the process “ ” A vibrant civil society that can mobilise resources, steer activities, contribute to the strategic framework and set governance “ ” A system which ensures empowerment of local structures which have responsibility to deliver results “ ” Necessary capacities with both technical and professional skills to deal with all HIV/AIDS response requirements “ ” Ability to execute national strategies according to plan, and innovating where necessary “ ” A response that is delivering results to which contributing partners are held accountable “ ” A nationally driven strategy that talks to the country’s current needs <ul><ul><li>Enable participants to add their own comments for each theme </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Working definition of country ownership Ownership criteria Description <ul><ul><li>Local institutions (e.g., Government, NGOs, civil society, private sector) o wn the final decisions for each stage (e.g., final sign-off of resource allocation decisions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local institutions manage the funds and have responsibility for programs </li></ul></ul>Institutional ownership 2 Capabilities <ul><ul><li>Local institutions (Government, NGOs, civil society, private sector) either have the capabilities required to perform activities in each stage or effectively outsource them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local institutions have the ability to dynamically modify programs based on evidence and feedback from each stage </li></ul></ul>3 Accountability <ul><ul><li>Local institutions are accountable for results to country citizens and international stakeholders through mechanisms where: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>responsibilities are identified with consequences for failure in performance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>measures are robust </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>transparency is present in information and processes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>mechanisms for input and feedback from civil society </li></ul></ul></ul>4 Political ownership/ stewardship 1 <ul><ul><li>Government has a clear aspiration for what should be accomplished in each stage with input from stakeholders (civil society, private sector, NGOs, and donors) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government is the architect of the overall process and facilitates input from civil society, private sector, NGOs, and donors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government has visibility and oversight into specific activities (“who does what”) conducted by stakeholders in each stage </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Political ownership/stewardship – what does great look like? Description <ul><ul><li>A significant and stable resource investment from government (finances, infrastructure, etc) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government leading across all stages of the business system in a way that incorporates input from all stakeholders (from strategy to evaluation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government has a clear aspiration for what should be accomplished at each stage of the business system including strategy, priorities, indicators, etc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government provides architecture around all stages of the business system including roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders, national and district level operational plans and mechanisms to collect stakeholder input/feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government has visibility and oversight into specific activities (“who does what”) conducted by stakeholders at each stage of the business system (from strategy to evaluation) </li></ul></ul>SOURCE: Draws upon concepts from: “Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness,” 2005; “Accra Agenda for Action”, 2008; “Three Ones Key Principles”, UNAIDS 2003; Yogesh Rajkotia, USAID Rwanda; South Africa HIV/AIDS response stakeholders 1 Government first among equals Clearly articulated government aspiration Government architecture of entire business system Government visibility and oversight into all response activities
  6. 6. Institutional and community ownership – what does great look like? SOURCE: Draws upon concepts from: “Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness,” 2005; “Accra Agenda for Action”, 2008; “Three Ones Key Principles”, UNAIDS 2003; Yogesh Rajkotia, USAID Rwanda; South Africa HIV/AIDS response stakeholders Description <ul><ul><li>Local institutions, civil society and communities actively participate in and provide feedback at all stages of the programme (from strategy to evaluation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local institutions, civil society and communities have clear roles and responsibilities in the response </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local institutions, civil society and communities own and direct final decisions around their contribution to the response within the architecture provided by government (resource allocation, implementation, research agenda, etc) </li></ul></ul>2 Local institutions / communities actively participate in all programme stages Local institutions / communities own and direct final decisions at all programme stages
  7. 7. Capabilities – what does great look like? SOURCE: Draws upon concepts from: “Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness,” 2005; “Accra Agenda for Action”, 2008; “Three Ones Key Principles”, UNAIDS 2003; Yogesh Rajkotia, USAID Rwanda; South Africa HIV/AIDS response stakeholders 3 Description <ul><ul><li>Local institutions have the technical and professional capabilities required to deliver activities across all programme stages (from strategy formulation to evaluation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local institutions have a process and approach to assess delivery approaches at all stages of the programme, address bottlenecks and adapt execution as required </li></ul></ul>Local institutions have the capabilities required to perform activities at all programme stages Local institutions have the ability to modify their approach based on evidence and feedback from all programme stages
  8. 8. Accountability – what does great look like? 4 Mechanisms for input and feedback are effective Description <ul><ul><li>There is a mechanism or body designated to assess all programme stages and the overall programme </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accountability measures are clearly defined for all programme stages and the overall programme and mechanisms and incentives exist to promote responsiveness to feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information gathering and decision making processes are agreed, transparent and open </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There is a clear mechanism and/or body designated to collect input and feedback from all stakeholders and feed back into relevant decision making </li></ul></ul>SOURCE: Draws upon concepts from: “Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness,” 2005; “Accra Agenda for Action”, 2008; “Three Ones Key Principles”, UNAIDS 2003; Yogesh Rajkotia, USAID Rwanda; South Africa HIV/AIDS response stakeholders Points of accountability are clearly defined Accountability measures are clearly defined Transparency is present in information and processes
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