• Save
Apache
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Apache

on

  • 257 views

basics of apache

basics of apache

Statistics

Views

Total Views
257
Views on SlideShare
256
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as OpenOffice

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Apache Document Transcript

  • 1. APACHE SSI(Server Side Includes):          SSI (Server Side Includes) are directives that are placed in HTML pages, and evaluated on the  server while the pages are being served. They let you add dynamically generated content to an  existing HTML page, without having to serve the entire page via a CGI program, or other dynamic  technology.       The decision of when to use SSI, and when to have your page entirely generated by some  program, is usually a matter of how much of the page is static, and how much needs to be  recalculated every time the page is served. SSI is a great way to add small pieces of information,  such as the current time. But if a majority of your page is being generated at the time that it is  served, you need to look for some other solution. Document root:      The directory (in the real filesystem) from which your Web server will be serving most of its  Web pages. For example:                     If you set the document root to /home/httpd/html, then accesses to  http://your.webserver.com/index.html would return the file /home/httpd/html/index.html. An access  to http://your.webserver.com/foo/gazonk.gif would return /home/httpd/html/foo/gazonk.gif. Error log :                 The path to the log file for error messages. Usually, it is logs/error_log, which is relative  to the ServerRoot. Often the directory logs in ServerRoot is a symbolic link to /var/log/httpd. Then  the log path above would result in error messages being logged to /var/log/httpd/error_log. Listen on port:                       The TCP port on which the Web server should listen for HTTP requests. The standard  port for HTTP is 80, so if you use another port you need to include it in the URL. For example, if  you let your Web server listen on port 8000, then the URL to your server would be  http://your.webserver.com:8000/. Server Root:               The ServerRoot directive sets the directory in which the server lives. Typically it will  contain the subdirectories conf/ and logs/. Relative paths in other configuration directives (such as  Include or LoadModule, for example) are taken as relative to this directory. Example:               ServerRoot /home/httpd  Virtuat Host:                <VirtualHost> and </VirtualHost> are used to enclose a group of directives that will  apply only to a particular virtual host. Any directive that is allowed in a virtual host context may be  used. When the server receives a request for a document on a particular virtual host, it uses the  configuration directives enclosed in the <VirtualHost>  section.
  • 2. Configure HTTPS:                      The  configure  script configures the source tree for compiling and installing the Apache  HTTP   Server   on   your   particular   platform.   Various   options   allow   the   compilation   of   a   server  corresponding to your personal requirements. Configuration File:          1.This article explains configuration files on a Linux system that  control user permissions,  system applications, daemons, services, and other administrative tasks in a multi­user, multi­tasking  environment.           2.These tasks include managing user accounts, allocating disk  quotas, managing e­mails and  newsgroups, and configuring kernel parameters.        3.This article also classifies the config files present on a Red Hat Linux system based on their  usage and the services they affect. Execution time:                 The time during which actual work, such as addition or multiplication, is carried out in  the execution of a computer instruction.             The time in which a single instruction is executed. It makes up the last half of the instruction  cycle.