Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Making More Of Mobile In Marketing And Business
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Making More Of Mobile In Marketing And Business

309
views

Published on

A recent headline in the business section of The Evening Standard heralded that ‘mobile is the new battleground in internet gold rush’ with the overriding belief that ‘success for mobile hinges on …

A recent headline in the business section of The Evening Standard heralded that ‘mobile is the new battleground in internet gold rush’ with the overriding belief that ‘success for mobile hinges on whether 3G will bring in advertising cash’. Those headlines and analysis could easily have been written back in 2001 and indeed were. At the time, the biggest gamble had taken place, the bid by major mobile operators to build, develop and operate a new and dynamic technological infrastructure for wireless mobile networks. To pay for the investment operators needed to find the killer application(s) beyond voice revenues. Much of the focus was centred on technology rather than the consumer and unfortunately in today’s market, still is.


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
309
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. CUE Entertainment Magazine March Issue 2008      Mobile Marketing & Distribution  The Future’s bright………the future’s blurred?    A recent headline in the business section of The Evening Standard heralded  that ‘mobile is the new battleground in internet gold rush’ with the overriding  belief that ‘success for mobile hinges on whether 3G will bring in advertising  cash’. Those headlines and analysis could easily have been written back in 2001  and indeed were. At the time, the biggest gamble had taken place, the bid by  major mobile operators to build, develop and operate a new and dynamic  technological infrastructure for wireless mobile networks. To pay for the  investment operators needed to find the killer application(s) beyond voice  revenues. Much of the focus was centred on technology rather than the  consumer and unfortunately in today’s market, still is.     But, are we seeing a genuine gold rush this time or as in the case first time  around, will it end in just a rush? According to Informa, mobile marketing will  account for $11billion by 2011, but to reach those kinds of numbers the mobile  market as a whole has to overcome some fundamental challenges.     So what does the mobile marketing landscape look like? How can businesses  and marketers manage another element of the increasingly multi‐disciplined  platforms available to reach consumers and how do you integrate mobile as  part of the overall marketing strategy and delivery? What is the opportunity  for brands and products in the entertainment sector to market to and  distribute content to consumers?  
  • 2.   According to OFCOM, by the end of 2006 there were nearly 70 million active  UK mobile subscriptions, an increase of 6% over the previous year. However,  the challenge for operators today given price decline in voice telephony is to  increase revenue per user and reduce churn. Voice accounts for 95% of mobile  revenue and the market for data distribution (in effect content) is still very  much in its infancy. This suggests that the market either isn’t ready or there  isn’t any real compelling content (what’s also known as the ‘killer application’)  for consumers.    At first glance, the infrastructure of the mobile landscape would appear to  suggest it’s complex and confusing. It is. The value chain over the last five or six  years has grown to include all sorts of technology and content participants:  mobile portals, CRM, location‐based services, aggregators, advertising  agencies, digital agencies, operators, broadcasters, content creators (ring‐ tones and alerts for example) and many other ‘specialists’ to boot. The list is  endless. Mobile marketing, as part of the whole mobile landscape can be  defined currently as a form of direct marketing and the opportunity for data  capture through promotions, incentives and competitions (to date mostly  achieved via the SMS marketing route).     A long list of industry analysts are also at odds over whether mobile marketing  will become a viable route to market. A recent study by Juniper Research  suggests that revenue through mobile user generated content (social  networking and dating for example) will increase tenfold by 2012. Continental  Research on the other hand has just reported its findings, suggesting advanced  features such as accessing the internet or downloading via a mobile phone is  declining.    Whatever happens in the long term, the challenge for businesses and  marketers today is the ability to outsource the delivery of mobile marketing to  the experts, whilst maintaining a brand, product or company ‘gatekeeper’ role, 
  • 3. encompassing an understanding of what’s happening in the wider  communications market but more importantly shape and implement a multi  platform and integrated marketing and business strategy. The key point here is  ‘integrated’. The most effective route to market is to integrate the mobile  channel alongside other communications channels rather than as stand alone.    Even if businesses and marketers get that right the challenge is compounded  by the one key priority: the consumer. Little is understood about consumer  activity and interaction in the mobile space. What is known is that consumers  need to make a confident and trusting leap to increasingly engage with content  through their mobile phones: pricing, the browser experience and compelling  content remain key barriers to growth. In addition, operators are reluctant to  share more than the basics of consumer segmentation: who is accessing  content? When, where how and why? The danger is the all too familiar  commodity and price‐led driven market, the ability to push all forms of content  through mobile phones with little regard for what consumers want and the  price they are prepared to pay.    But some signs are that we may be at the tipping point. A recent survey by  Airwide Solutions indicates that by 2009, 85% of brands will be investing at  least 10% of marketing budgets through mobile marketing (currently about  28% of brands use SMS marketing) There are a number of examples across  various markets that illustrate the success of mobile marketing and  distribution, albeit in its basic form via text promotions, data capture and a call  to action. Brands have been experimenting with mobile marketing for some  time now.  Nike in the US through its advertising prompted consumers to engage via  mobile phone and online to personalise their own Nike shoes which they were  then able to pick up in‐store; Peugeot in the UK using SMS text mechanic to  encourage take up of test drives; and more recently the use of QR codes, 2‐D  or 3D bar codes on products and advertising that can be scanned by a mobile  phone allowing access to more information via the mobile internet  (Woollaston Estate Wines in Japan and DVD 28 Weeks Later in the UK both 
  • 4. recently used the application as part of their overall marketing  campaigns).We’re beginning to see the emergence of innovative marketing  and distribution strategies across the wider entertainment market. Andy  McNab, former SAS soldier and author recently announced the opportunity to  receive the first chapter of his latest book via text as well as an audio version.  2shop4.com has recently announced the ability for consumers to order goods  and services via their phone which will be delivered to home once purchased  via a text mechanic they’ve seen advertised.    Success for brands and products in the mobile marketing space will lie in the  hands of the consumer, but the mobile market as a whole can facilitate that  success: introduce low cost and flat rate pricing; improve the browser  experience via mobile and focus on what the consumer wants rather than  what the technology provides. The opportunity to develop mobile marketing  campaigns as part of an integrated marketing strategy will undoubtedly  emerge and as such businesses need to think about how to harness mobile as  part of that strategy and then importantly how to manage and resource it.    Gavin Miller writing for Cue Entertainment March 2008