Link SDVOSB Past Performance Summaries
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Link SDVOSB Past Performance Summaries

  • 591 views
Uploaded on

Sample Energy Projects

Sample Energy Projects

More in: Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
591
On Slideshare
580
From Embeds
11
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 11

http://www.linkedin.com 10
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................................................................................................. 1INTRODUCTION TO LINK RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................4BIOFUEL: CELLULOSIC ETHANOL ....................................................................................................................................5 Cellulosic Ethanol from Municipal Solid Waste ......................................................................................................... 5BIOFUEL: BIODIESEL FROM BEEF TALLOW ....................................................................................................................7 Australian Biodiesel Group Technology Development, Plant Startup, and North American Market Penetration ... 7 Key Issues Relevant to Transition Success ................................................................................................................ 7 Technology Optimization: .....................................................................................................................................7 Economic...............................................................................................................................................................8 Marketing..............................................................................................................................................................8 Operations and Maintenance ...............................................................................................................................8 Link Scope re: Developing ISO-9000 Consistent Processes ....................................................................................... 8 Level 1 Processes per ISO-9000 Quality Manual ...................................................................................................8 Level 2 Processes ..................................................................................................................................................8 Level 3 Processes ..................................................................................................................................................9DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: BIOFUELS/BIOMASS .........................................................................................................10 Summary ................................................................................................................................................................. 10WGS ENERGY: BIOMASS POWER PLANT .....................................................................................................................12 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................ 12 Why LINK Was Selected .......................................................................................................................................... 12 LINK Scope and Accomplishments .......................................................................................................................... 13 Outage Philosophy and Plan ...............................................................................................................................13 Management of Outages ....................................................................................................................................13 Staffing ................................................................................................................................................................14 Utilization of Outside Contractors ......................................................................................................................14NATIONAL TRIGENERATION CHP COMPANY ...............................................................................................................15 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................ 15 Link’s Role ............................................................................................................................................................... 15 Project Description .............................................................................................................................................16SOURCE ENERGY ..........................................................................................................................................................18 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................ 18 Why LINK Was Selected ......................................................................................................................................18 LINK Scope and Accomplishments ......................................................................................................................19
  • 2. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESNATIONAL COMMERCE BANK .....................................................................................................................................22 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................ 22 Why LINK Was Selected .......................................................................................................................................... 22 LINK Scope and Accomplishments ......................................................................................................................23NORTH BRANCH GENERATING STATION .....................................................................................................................24 Executive Summary: ................................................................................................................................................ 24 Facility Description .................................................................................................................................................. 24 Link Scope and Accomplishments ........................................................................................................................... 25BELLEMEADE GENERATING STATION: COGENERATION ..............................................................................................28 Summary ................................................................................................................................................................. 28 LINK Scope:.............................................................................................................................................................. 28 Combustion Turbines/generators .......................................................................................................................28 Heat Recovery Steam Generators .......................................................................................................................28 Steam Turbine/generator and Cooling System ...................................................................................................29 Fuel Supply ..........................................................................................................................................................29 Water Supply ......................................................................................................................................................29 Budget .................................................................................................................................................................29INTERNATIONAL PAPER: COGENERATION ...................................................................................................................30 Background ............................................................................................................................................................. 30 Facility Description .................................................................................................................................................. 30 Link’s Scope ............................................................................................................................................................. 30PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION FACILITY: TRANSITION MANAGEMENT ............................................................32 Background ............................................................................................................................................................. 32 Link Scope ............................................................................................................................................................... 32 Link Accomplishments............................................................................................................................................. 34TRANSITION MANAGEMENT: GENERAL ......................................................................................................................35 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................ 35October 2012 Cellulosic Ethanol
  • 3. INTRODUCTION TO LINK RESOURCESFounded in 1994, Link Resources, Inc. (LINK) is a Service Disabled Veteran Owned SmallBusiness with broad operations-related capabilities in the energy space, including O&M,commissioning, construction management, energy consulting, and so on. LINK has moreenergy-related experience than any other SDVOSB.LINK’s core competence lies in the operation and transitioning of complex facilities. We take aholistic perspective, integrating technical, contractual, organizational, human, and operationalmatters. LINK has provided full-scope facility management services to an array of diverseclients - - both domestic and international, with turn-key responsibility for staffing, maintenance,interface with stakeholders, and ultimate facility performance that exceeded expectations. LINKhas also executed dozens of projects relating to energy services, transition management, andgeneral consulting to the broadest range of clients, often focusing on designing andimplementing transition plans or portions thereof.LINK is staffed with a team of senior personnel all of whom had experience in operations and/ormaintenance - - across a spectrum of fuels, energy technologies and contexts:  Fuels: Coal, waste coal, natural gas, refined oils, crude oil, wood, other cellulose, garbage, other waste fuels, nuclear;  Traditional Technologies: PC/stoker/CFB boilers, steam and gas turbines, combined- cycle, simple-cycle, tri-generation, large chillers, condensers (including air-cooled), water treatment, and the spectrum of associated balance-of-plant equipment;  Renewable Technologies: Biofuels (including non-food based biodiesel and bioethanol), cellulosic ethanol, biomass combustion, biomass gasification, wind, and solar;  Applications: Steam for electricity, steam for process and heating, waste heat for steam, electricity for cooling, waste heat for regenerative cooling, biofuel for transportation;  Clients: Commercial, industrial, utility, Federal. Domestic and Off-shore.
  • 4. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESBIOFUEL: CELLULOSIC ETHANOLCellulosic Ethanol from Municipal Solid WasteIn 1999 Link was awarded a project toassist Masada Resource Group in thedevelopment and planning of a largecellulose-to-ethanol project using astrong-acid approach on Municipal SolidWaste feedstock. Link was also awardedEPC oversight (including pilot projectsfor particularly troublesome sub-systems), commissioning and long-termoperations contracts for the yet-to-be-constructed plant in Middletown, NY. Thecomplex plant included MSW sorting, drying, hydrolyzation and cellulose conversion, acidrecovery, fermentation, and distillation. The plant utilized dried sewage sludge converted tosteam via a fluidized bed boiler, and had several profitable byproducts such as typical MSWrejects (e.g. aluminum), CO2, soil treatment, and green fuel. Link’s assignments during theproject period included oversight of the prime EPC contractor, Kvaerner, during engineering andprocurement; Link’s prime focus was the constructability and the operability of the processesand systems. Link also, in joint effort with Kvaerner, developed all O&M policies and proceduresfor plant equipment and systems. The first facility has not yet been constructed due to difficultiesin obtaining investors in the $400M facility.Link’s Full-scope O&M Contract included: Develop Accounting infrastructure  Develop HazCom plan for post-Acceptance Develop Administrative processes  Procure Accounting Software Develop Filing System for post-Acceptance  Procure Human resource software Develop list of Furnishings  Procure Information management software Develop list of tools for Operator  Procure Inventory & warehousing software Develop Operating Plan  Procure Network and office software Develop Information management infrastructure  Procure Planning/scheduling software Develop Environmental emissions  Procure Trending, predictive maintenance, documentation/reporting formats data analysis software Develop Sustainability & Environmental Mgt  Develop Operability and maintainability program specifications Develop specification for Vendor manuals &  Develop Warranty program management documentation plan for post-AcceptanceOctober 2012 Cellulosic Ethanol
  • 5. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES Recruiting/Interview trips & expenses  Develop manpower loading/mobilization chart Develop Human resource infrastructure  Develop Training program Develop program/list Employee recognition  Develop Performance and condition programs monitoring plan Procure Predictive maintenance equipment  Develop Safety Program for Post-Acceptance Develop Inventory Mgt & warehousing policy  Develop Maintenance policy & programs Develop Spare parts inventory mgt system  Procure Procurement software Procure Office furnishings and equipment for  Develop Engineering Program for Post- operator Acceptance Develop numbering convention: Design  Training Video library equipment/system numbering convention for  Procure Timekeeping Software construct  Procure all tools Identify and risk mitigate possible alternate scenarios, including construct delays, early completions, and need for additional personnel, with resultant impact on Link staffing and associated costsOctober 2012 Cellulosic Ethanol
  • 6. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESBIOFUEL: BIODIESEL FROM BEEFTALLOWAustralian Biodiesel Group Technology Development, Plant Startup, andNorth American Market PenetrationLink Resources, Inc. was engaged by Australian Biodiesel Group (ABG) to complete the startupof their first full-scale (40 MMgpy) biodiesel plant in Australia, and then develop and transitiontheir organization, processes, and technology into the North American market. The scopeincluded development of the entire business, administrative, process, technical, and humaninfrastructure. The transition and infrastructure development had to be in compliance with therequirements of ISO-9000.The final organization would have approximately 120 staff at distributed facilities across NorthAmerica, requiring a comprehensive yet efficient communications and reporting process thatcan support quality control requirements, team-working, regulatory compliance, and advanceeconomies of scale. Budgets managed by Link will exceed $200 million, and annual revenuesare anticipated at $300 million.Australian Biodiesel Group (ABG), a subsidiary of Transfield,initially utilized Link in the startup and commissioning of its40 mgpy continuous transesterification facility inQueensland. Link’s contract expanded into creating the turn-key administrative process, financial, and administrativeinfrastructure for the fleet of biodiesel facilities they intendedto build in the U.S. This infrastructure included plans andschedules for EPC/commissioning/operations, draftspecifications and contracts for EPC, all personnel andorganizational policies/procedures, all O&M policies and procedures, staffing and compensationplans, and the Operating Plan.Key Issues Relevant to Transition SuccessTechnology Optimization:  Quality control when utilizing used oils animal fat feedstocks  Production quality control  Ability to quickly/smoothly switch between/blend different feedstocks (possibly including eventually palm oil)October 2012 Biodiesel
  • 7. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESEconomic  Quality of North American business modeling  Feedstock delivery pricing and predictability  Final biodiesel production cost and sensitivity to petro-diesel pricesMarketing  Clarity of target markets  Facility proximity to target marketsOperations and Maintenance  Although the cost of operations and maintenance is proportionally small compare to feedstock costs, prudent and high-quality operating practices can reduce production costs and add to income. During periods where margins get squeezed, the more efficient plants will have the competitive edge.  Quality control of product is critical to ABG reputation and to achieve top dollar for the market.  State of the art maintenance practices lead to reduced downtime and therefore increased plant production.Link Scope re: Developing ISO-9000 Consistent Processes Level 1 Processes per ISO-9000 Quality Manual  Link to Quality Level 3 Processes  Management Responsibility  Quality System  Internal Quality Audits  Document and Data Control  Control of Quality Records  Process Control  ID and Traceability  Inspection and Testing  Nonconforming Product  Corrective and Preventive Action  References Level 2 Processes  Policies  Link-Generated References that will fade away  Internal Procurement Specifications  Board Governance  LLC Operating Agreement  Note: Quality Policy is a "Level 1"October 2012 Biodiesel
  • 8. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES Level 3 Processes  Safety & Health (SH) Processes (Manual)  Security Processes  Human Capital (HC) Processes  Commercial Management (CM) Processes  Commissioning Processes (Manual) 01 91 00  Standard Operating Processes (SOP)  Training Processes  Index of Archived Processes  Quality Program Processes (QPPs)  Work Mgt (WM) Processes  Material Capital (MC) Processes  Sustainability (SU) Processes  Information & Communications (IC) ProcessesOctober 2012 Biodiesel
  • 9. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESDEPARTMENT OF ENERGY:BIOFUELS/BIOMASSSummaryLink Resources, Inc. has been engaged by the Department ofEnergy and the Department of Agriculture in several projects toassist in the evaluation of solicitations from biofuel and/orbiomass technology companies interested in receiving Federalgrants or loans for the Demonstration pilot and demonstrationplants using technologies that could be commercially viable inthe short term. During the assignments Link providedDOE/DOA with perspectives using a broad spectrum oftechnologies and different contexts including:  MSW (cellulosic portion) to ethanol processes using strong acids (see separate project description)  Ethanol Generation from Waste Sugars using immobilized microbe bioreactor technology: including waste water treatment and recycling of waste carbon sources.  Conversion of Agricultural residue (corn stover and other lignocellulose biomass) to Ethanol and Ethyl Acrylate: included pretreatment of feedstock into pellets and subsequent hydrolyzation of cellulosic and hemi-cellulosic fractions, as well as other subsequent and other chemical treatments  Production of Cellulosic Ethanol from Corn Stover: using yeast technology for the fermentation of both five and six carbon sugars while simultaneously co- produces high value co-products such as the cellulases, hemi-cellulases, or other important industrial enzymes.  Fuel Ethanol from Barley: producing parasitic electricity and thermal energy from available biomass (waste wood and other plant based products); recovering CO2 from the ethanol fermentation process to produce commercial grade liquid CO2 for the production of dry ice and to use in the on-site greenhouses. Utilizing waste process heat, available water, available land and CO2 in on-site greenhouses.  Cellulose to Ethanol Conversion using Enzymes: implementation of 2nd generation technologies to improve the overall performance of existing cellulose to ethanol conversion using enzymes. Feedstock to be further investigated included bagasse, energy cane, high biomass, sorghum, wood, switchgrass, corn stover, and miscanthus.  “Drop-In” Bio-refineries: improving harvest operations and maximizing the ethanol yield/acre of fermentation of sweet sorghum, and establishing smallOctober 2012 DOE Biofuel/Biomass
  • 10. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES commercially viable “drop in place” bio-refineries, combined with a decentralized network of fueling stations where the ethanol would be blended “at the pump”.  Re-purposing of a Corn-based Ethanol Facilities: redesigning corn-based ethanol facilities to use alternative feedstocks.  Biomass gasification: for steam generation.  Biomass combustion: utilizing a variety of technologies including stationary and moving stoker grates, and fluidized beds. Link’s scope included comprehensive reviews of financial, technical, and commercialization plans within proposals. Reviews were followed by panel discussions with cross-disciplined panelists, oral summaries, written summaries and final formal evaluations.October 2012 DOE Biofuel/Biomass
  • 11. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESWGS ENERGY: BIOMASS POWER PLANTIntroductionWGS Energy builds and acquires green/sustainable energy generation and energytransformation facilities. A representative project is the 65MW (gross) electric production facilityin Twiggs County Georgia that gasifies biomass to develop steam for direct conversion toelectricity and for heating and drying of incoming feedstock. LINK was engaged after acompetitive bidding process to select the multi-year Operator, wherein LINK offered a morecomprehensive and yet more detailed and credible than a much larger rival.Why LINK Was SelectedSince biomass plants have a high degree of complexity, one of WGS concerns was having anOperator who had direct experience and also the predisposition to 1) customize the plant for thespecific needs of the client, and 2) focus on maintenance and outage management. Thetechnology and equipment complexities include chipping the incoming organic waste, drying,storing, conveying, feeding, gasification, gas cleaning, combustion, waste heat-to-steamgeneration, large electric turbine-generators, switchyard and interconnection with grid, ashhandling and disposal, heavy truck traffic in/out leading to safety, security, and local neighborconcerns, and so forthOne particular aspect of LINK’s “Conduct of Maintenance” approach that impressed WGS wasour planning for Short Notice Outages (SNOs). With the amount of equipment, the complexity ofthe processes, and the overall lack of redundancy in design, there is no doubt that equipmentwill fail; the issue is really how quickly the Operator can get it back on line at full capacity. LINKdeveloped a protocol for SNOs that involves: 1. A basic Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) approach that utilizes the Operator’s experience and information from equipment vendors to identify points-of-likely-failure. 2. A review of spare parts requirements to ensure replacement parts are available to make associated repairs. 3. Storing associated sets of spare parts so that they can be immediately retrieved “as a package” if/when a pre-identified SNO occurs. 4. Identification and pre-location of tools necessary to make specific SNO repairs. 5. Preparation (and sometime even rehearsal) of the maintenance team to optimize their mobilization and task-performance to complete the repair in the minimum time.October 2012 WGS Energy- Biomass
  • 12. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES 6. Iteration on the above as lessons are learned.LINK Scope and AccomplishmentsIn addition to the broad scope associated with a multi-year O&M contract (some elements ofwhich are addressed elsewhere in this document), the following focuses on Outage Philosophyand Planning which was particularly important on the Twiggs County project.Outage Philosophy and Plan Plant outages are scheduled in the Spring and Fall, to avoid peak seasons and any demonstration periods established by Georgia Power. The philosophy of the Spring outage is characterized by:  complete maintenance essential to operate until Fall  thoroughly inspect systems in order to plan for the Fall inspection  test and challenge the plant planning, scheduling, contracting, parts ordering, and outage management skills so that an improvement plan can be accomplished prior to Fall outage  execute the predictive maintenance program that includes boiler and turbine predictions based on inspection & test criteria. The philosophy of the Fall outage is:  complete all maintenance necessary to operate for 18 months without another outage  double-check inspection to ensure spring outage inspection process was adequate  again test & challenge the outage management system & try to improve  prepare for winter (i.e. plant winterization)Management of Outages The formality of the maintenance planning and scheduled activities warrants attention. For example, planning for major scheduled outages begin 18 months in advance, with very clear accountabilities established. Major vendors are notified and invited to participate in the planning exercise, and requested to justify their cost-effectiveness on the outage. Depending on the specific skills of the management team, planning and scheduling software may be appropriate for outages. Pending maintenance for equipment that can only be accomplished during shutdowns are closely managed and preparations made such that the facility can effectively utilize any unscheduled outage to complete such maintenance. Additionally, the maintenanceOctober 2012 WGS Energy- Biomass
  • 13. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES department continually plans routine maintenance, inspections, and predictive maintenance that can only be performed when equipment is off-line, so that it will be performed during periods when the plant is dispatched off-lineStaffing Major OEM vendors are urged to provide maximum input regarding their experiences and lessons learned in their recent outage support roles. Refractory deterioration remains a major concern OEMs are closely consulted to ensure cost-effective management of the high cost and high impact problems. The entire staff is utilized to maximum potential in order to reduce the requirements for outside contractors and temporary employees.Utilization of Outside Contractors Reliance on contractors can readily become excessive. In particular, mechanical contractors, welding, and cleaning/vacuum services can often be reduced given the capabilities of the work force; and the money that is saved can be better spent the capital purchase a vacuum/cleaning truck. LINK’s philosophy on the use on contractors is clear. They are necessary only when: 1) personnel on site have no additional capacity to perform the function, and failure to complete the work will or could likely result in expenditures or loss of revenues in excess of the cost of the contractor; or 2) when the work to be done in accordance with the Operating Plan requires skills, tools, or licenses not held by the facility. LINK’s contractor selection process/criteria includes a solid program for competitive bidding, closely assessing experience, resources, price, responsiveness, and risk-sharing concepts. Value is considered more important than low price. Disadvantaged businesses are seriously considered for all subcontracted work. LINK believes that general services agreements can frequently be a cost-saving mechanism for frequently utilized services and such contracts will be pursued for construction, welding, civil work, etc. The client’s resources are considered at all stages of the purchasing and contracting process to ensure that the client’s resources are utilized if cost effective and appropriate.October 2012 WGS Energy- Biomass
  • 14. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESNATIONAL TRIGENERATION CHPCOMPANYIntroductionNTCC is a leading energy services company in the Middle East, delivering reliable andenvironment-friendly cooling, heating, and power (CHP) to commercial, industrial andgovernmental organizations. NTCC is at the forefront of the Middle East in acquiring inefficientenergy facilities and improving the performance by adding cogeneration and trigenerationsolutions. NTCC also builds energy efficient facilities at greenfield and brownfield sites. Theyoffer build-own-transfer (BOT), as well as build-own-operate (BOO) solutions in power,cooling/steam, and water desalination.Although NTCC is a relatively young company, NTCC is now either managing or in the processof assuming control of 100,000 tons of cooling, 80 MW of electrical generation, and 59,000 lb/hrsteam. LINK has been a partner with NTCC since 2008 since NTCC recognized they hadneither the O&M skillsets nor infrastructure to operate and maintain their facilities.Link’s RoleLINK was engaged to develop NTCC’s entire organizational, process, and administrativeinfrastructure for its O&M division while it operated and maintained current and imminent energyfacilities. LINK is included as a “partner on NTCC’s web pagehttp://www.ntcc.com.sa/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=69&Itemid=91&lang=en).NTCC’s traditional energy generation/transformation technologies utilized at facilities:  Electric chillers  Regenerative chillers (using waste heat input)  Steam Boilers  Power generation  Plus balance of plant to include of course cooling towers, condensers, piping, valves, motors, pumps, motor control centers, transformers, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), Aerial View of KKMC distributed control systems (DCS including Mark V, WDPF & Emerson Delta V), compressed air, water purification, etc.October 2012 Source Energy-CHP
  • 15. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESWith the award of the King Khalid Military City contract, additional larger frame technologiesinclude a (CHP) plant consisting of 200MW of Westinghouse 251B Gas Turbine electricitygeneration, eight 6,500 ton chillers, GE/Woodward DCS controls, 10 CW pumps, and adistributed CW/HW pipe feed and return system to over 80 buildings on the 5000-man KKMCmilitary city. Gas Turbines are being upgraded to combined cycle with Heat Recovery SteamGenerators (HRSGs).Project DescriptionAs part of LINK’s broad scope to operate and maintain existing and future facilities, it wasnecessary for Link to establish a standard corporate-wide O&M program; and operated andmaintained existing and newly acquired/built CHP energy facilities. Total scope included:  Identified, recruited and hired operators, technicians, and manual labor  Developed and executed transition plans that optimized the assumption of O&M responsibilities of existing facilities  Developed and implemented Operating Plans  Provided management and supervision as necessary  Provided recruiting, policies/procedures;  Developed and implemented QC programs  Developed and implemented safety training programs  Developed and implemented commissioning plans and services  Prepared O&M budgets for existing plants as well as in proposals for new plants  Developed transition budgets  Designed and set-up Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS)  Assisted the client in the preparation of proposals for new projects  Working with Performance Improvements (PI) Ltd, designed and installed PI control system remote monitoring system that interfaced with control systems including Mark V, WPDF, and Emerson Delta V  Managed environmental compliance  Assumed direct interface with on-site clients which was essential to the customer relationship management (CRM)  Performed numerous other tasksLINK built a world class O&M organization and infrastructure that became an effective part ofthe NTCC business model. NTCC energy facilities have high operational demands; in otherwords, NTCC clients expect cooling, heating, and power 24/7/365 and failure to provide suchservices is not an option. In the exacting environment, LINK’s O&M services exceededexpectations by delivering 24/7 CHP even during severe circumstances (e.g. weather), thatotherwise could have been claimed as force majeure.October 2012 Source Energy-CHP
  • 16. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESOctober 2012 Source Energy-CHP
  • 17. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESSOURCE ENERGYIntroductionIn partnership with its customers, Source Energy (SE) finances, develops, builds, operates andmaintains advanced power technologies that serve the long-term heating, cooling, and powerrequirements of commerce, industry, and government. Backed by significant financial resourcesand an extensive network of influential relationships, Source Energy takes full responsibility forensuring customers efficient, sustainable and reliable district energy and district coolingservices, tailored to custom needs, from a single outsourced provider.Source Energy provides cooling, heating and power solutions on a Build-Own-Operate-Transfer(BOOT) basis. Source Energy recently won a Saudi Arabian Riyal (SAR)1 BILLION SaudiArabian contract from for providing the 2nd Industrial City in Jeddah with central cooling &power services. It will supply the industrial city with about cooling and electrical power. Thedistrict cooling network will be operated by Source Energy for 30 years. LINK is under contractto operate and maintain projects engaged by Source Energy.Source Energy provides cooling, heating and power solutions on a Build-Operate-Transferbasis. An example of one large project includes:  Jeddah Industrial City 2: A SAR 1 billion contract from MODON provides the 2nd Industrial City in Jeddah with a central CHP facility. Source Energy supplies the City with approximately 80,000 tons of cooling, and produces over 50 MW of electrical power. Smaller projects include:  Al Anoud Tower in Riyadh  King Road Tower CHP Plant in Jeddah,  Al Khobar Lakes Power Plant in Al Khobar. Each of which has either electric chillers, and/or regenerative chillers, and/or steam boilers, and/or power generation (e.g.diesels), plus extensive balance of plant, water treatment, and large cooling towers.Why LINK Was SelectedLINK was engaged for some of the same reasons elaborated in the NTCC section above. Theselection was also heavily influenced by LINK’s operating philosophy and culture, since SE wasOctober 2012 Source Energy-CHP
  • 18. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESconvinced that the following critical components must form the basis of any contractualoperator-client relationship for a multi-year engagement: 1. a willingness to “partner” and work in an honest, trusting environment to achieve mutual goals 2. flexibility, since over the long term it is not possible to consider all the combinations of events that may occur; agreements don’t govern good relationships as much as good relationships govern the agreements, and 3. sufficient depth to provide necessary scope: for example, there has been a general tendency for many companies to undervalue the administrative, human resource, and security skills that are required to ensure compliance with law as well as maintain a workforce that can provide the exceptional levels of serviceSource Energy was also impressed with LINK’s focus on developing comprehensive OperatingPlans for existing and new CHP projects, which would comprehensively address operatingformality, maintenance skillsets, compliance with policy and procedure, training,planning/scheduling/budgeting, safety, and response to emergency/non-routine situations.LINKs initial assessment of existing SE facilities led to the conclusion that, in order to attain thelargest short-term improvement in plant reliability, the first years focus of investment should beon safety training, and programmatic maintenance.LINK Scope and AccomplishmentsLINK was initially hired to provide elements of SE’s operational infrastructure and scopeexpanded into LINK’s provision of complete O&M services. Since then it has managed thedevelopment of the infrastructure and functionality of the entire Operations Division of SourceEnergy.With respect to safety, the focus that LINK stressed to SE centered around two equallyimportant factors: 1) an emotional investment in safety, and 2) the the lack of a safe workenvironment is an unaffordable cost. Thus LINK developed a Safety Program encompassing: 1. a monthly newsletter on safety issues and/or lessons learned 2. safety training for all employees during first 30 days 3. a required safety review course for each new employee and each employee annually 4. periodic safety drills for each shift, such as fire drills, at least quarterly 5. management and supervisory safety goals with bonus and/or salary impact 6. a modified work recovery program to return injured employees to work sooner.In the safety training arena, LINK developed:  Training Requirements and GuidelinesOctober 2012 Source Energy-CHP
  • 19. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES  Safety Program Self-Evaluation  Safety Inspection Checklists  Record-keeping Handbook  Safety Presentation for Classroom Training  Safety Procedures (e.g. hotwork, electrical, lockout/tagout, confined space entry, etc.)LINK’s maintenance program upgrade consisted of a focus on optimization-centeredmaintenance. In other words, LINK utilized the concepts of reliability centered maintenancewhere there are critical components that are likely to affect availability or safety. However, notall aspects of RCM were used due to the fact that it is seldom cost-effective to perform thedegree of analysis often required in a true RCM program. The optimization-centered programalso integrated equipment history, event recording, trending, and root cause analysis into theprogram to improve performance. The real key to the successful maintenance program,however, was the basic due diligence from managers and supervisors, rather than the level ofsophistication of the program.LINK’s goal for the Source Energy plants was to be the most reliable CHP producer in itscategory in a safe and socially responsible manner. LINK achieved these objectives by settingshort and long term goals for each facility in the following areas:  improved profitability,  enhanced reliability,  low cost production,  environmental and safety consciousness,  cooperative working relationships with each client/steam host,  a rewarding work environment,  and responsible corporate citizenship. At King Road Tower in Jeddah, LINK was asked to come in and rescue a failing construction project. LINK re-organized the construction staff and refined the plan leading to the accomplishment of a 1 August 2011 construction milestone, thus avoiding a multimillion dollar construction penalty. LINK prepared budgets, managed construction crews, provided liaison service with main building contractor, hired new contractors and staff, and managed the procurement of all supplies including interfacing with delinquent suppliers to force delivery completion.At Al Anoud Tower, LINK provided design input along with equipment and supplyrecommendations during construction process and managed the facility into commercialoperations. LINK organized and recruited new facility staff to include new equipment training atBroad in China and with Emerson in Riyadh.October 2012 Source Energy-CHP
  • 20. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESAt Al Khobar Lakes power project, LINK took over control of the construction process at the25% stage of completion. LINK recruited and deployed staff to the site including managing allHR and admin tasks to support the staff living requirements in Al Khobar. LINK managed allphases of the project, taking it to commercial operation. LINK connected this sites’ DCS(Emerson Delta V) into its remote control and monitoring capabilities for Source Energy.LINK’s administrative scope included:  operating procedures,  training,  safety,  environmental compliance,  transition management,  recruiting,  proposal preparation,  budgeting,  construction management,  commissioning,  warehousing protocols,  preventive & predictive maintenance, and  major unplanned and planned outage management.October 2012 Source Energy-CHP
  • 21. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESNATIONAL COMMERCE BANKIntroductionThe National Commerce Bank is the largest bank in the Kingdom ofSaudi Arabia. NCB has multiple facilities including bank buildings,administrative buildings, and a large IT center where proper coolingand/or heating is critical to servicing the bank’s customers,maintaining continuity of bank operations, and indeed security. Mostof the NCB complex has its own CHP facility yet reliability was poor,and since the local electric utility grid was unreliable it was essentialfor NCB to improve the capacity and the reliability of its energyfacilities.Why LINK Was SelectedLINK was selected for some of the same reasons expressed elsewhere in this document - - forthe sake of brevity not repeated in this section. Yet after LINK made a preliminary assessmentthat NCB’s reliability and capacity concerns were primarily driven by poor maintenance, LINKdeveloped a Maintenance Rejuvenation Approach that impressed NCB: immediate "conduct of maintenance" training in order to address maintenance philosophy and motivational issues, and communicate that each discipline shares a role in maintenance, followed by technical/skills training in deficient areas for maintenance personnel realignment of preventive & routine maintenance responsibilities for roving operators endorsement of reliability centered maintenance (RCM) where there are critical components that are likely to affect availability or safety transition equipment history, event recording, trending, and root cause analysis to improve performance management training to identify accountabilities for preventive and predictive maintenance at the shift supervisors, operations manager, and maintenance manager levels evolutionary execution of a cost-effective predictive maintenance program to include (in order of priority) vibration analysis on critical components, lubricant analysis, thermographic analysis, motor circuit testing, on-line performance monitoring, ultrasonic detection, and gas analysis progress toward a maintenance mix goal of 45%/35%/20% for corrective/ preventive/predictive maintenance, respectively evaluation of the functionality of the CMMS system, including unused capabilities increased formality of the maintenance planning and scheduling activities invitation to major vendors to participate in the maintenance planning.October 2012 National Commerce Bank-CHP
  • 22. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESLINK Scope and AccomplishmentsLINK provided operations and maintenance services for the Saudi National Commercial Bank inboth Riyadh and Jeddah. Through initial audits, LINK established the need for and executedmultiple improvement projects: 1. Efficiency Project…results were a reduction in 2009 of 241,777 kwh for a savings of $25,000 with a reduction of 1,370,214 kg /yr less Green House Gas emissions. 2. Reliability Project - NCB IT Center and Regional Office- 24 months without a service interruption. Maintenance improvements resulted in the elimination of a planned equipment replacement project costing in excess of $3 million. 3. Housekeeping Project - Facilities cleaned, organized, and maintained to a higher standard. All facility walls and floors cleaned and re-painted. Tools, parts, and supplies were categorized and organized. 4. Safety Project – OSHA based Safety procedures were written and tailored for each sites’ equipment and hazards. Safety Showers, eyewash stations, first aid kits, fall protection, PPE, Fire protection upgrades were implemented and a safety culture was cultivated thru training and program implementation. 5. Remote Monitoring Project - SECURE Offsite Control Performance & Diagnostic Center implemented in Riyadh to manage both facilities. Night Shift was eliminated at all NCB Facilities upon project completion. 6. Client Management Project – A re-focus on client relationship management resulted in a successful PR campaign centered around 2 years of project upgrades, customer satisfaction, and facility performance improvements which culminated with the facilities considered to be the best maintained at NCB. During the 2011 Jeddah floods…LINK’s facility staff was pivotal in assisting NCB manage the devastation wrought on their facilities, even though this was outside of LINK’s scope of work. 7. Staff Training Project – Vendor training, Safety Training, Environmental Training and On the Job Training culminated in a $600,000 savings in 12 months. All personnel were re- trained to be a multi-skilled work force resulting in a 75% drop in contract labor. 8. CMMS Project – LINK implemented 2 CMMS systems. A temporary CMMS within 30 days while a managing the implementation of a million dollar Oracle suite. Electronic rounds were integrated to give staff technological flexibility in data and maintenance record keeping. Digital Thumbprint Scanners were also implemented to log & track employees work hours.October 2012 National Commerce Bank-CHP
  • 23. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESNORTH BRANCH GENERATING STATIONExecutive Summary:Dominion Virginia Power awarded LINK this multi-year full-scopeoperations and maintenance agreement after a competitivesolicitation that included Bechtel, Babcock & Wilcox, and Stone &Webster (subsidiary of Shaw Group) among others. North Branchwas an existing 80 MW waste-coal fired electric generationstation utilizing two circulating fluidized boilers (395,000 lb/hrsteam each), a single turbine generator, an air-cooledcondenser, and a staff of originally sixty-five (65). LINKdramatically cut costs from $35/mwhr to $25/mwhr - - reducingstaff to 46.Facility DescriptionElectrical generating equipment consist of two 1770 psi, 395,000 lb/hr, natural circulation,circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers (coal fired) and one ABB VAX type steam turbinegenerator rated at 93,500 KW. The station can generate approximately eighty megawatts netpower. The boiler and steam turbine is controlled by a Bailey INFI 90 distributed control system.Station cold start-up power is supplied through a 69000/4160 volt, 6,250 KVA step-downtransformer. After the steam turbine generator is placed on line, station power is suppliedthrough two 13800/4160 volt, 10000 KVA step-down transformers feeding two separate 4160volt bus bars. Power is delivered to the utility grid through a 13,800/115,000 volt step-uptransformer.Steam exiting from the steam turbine passes through horizontal ductwork to an air-cooledcondenser. Hogging and a holding ejector system removes non-condensables from thecondenser. The condensate drains by gravity to a collection hotwell tank. A 200 HP verticalturbine pump takes suction on the hotwell tank and pumps the condensate through two lowpressure feedwater heaters to the deaerating/storage tank. A 1500 HP electric driven feedwaterpump takes suction on the deaerating/storage tank and pumps the feedwater through two highpressure feedwater heaters to the boilers. Auxiliary cooling water for pumps, coolers, seals, andbearings is supplied from a 2 cell cooling tower located on the roof.Waste coal (gob) burned in the boilers is delivered to the station by truck and is purchased fromBuffalo Coal Company and Mettiki Company. The gob is sized in a Pennsylvania CrusherOctober 2012 North Branch-Electric Plant
  • 24. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESHammermill and is stored in one of four storage bins (800 ton capacity each). Normally, threedays worth of coal is kept on premises.The circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers operate on the principle that limestone fed into thecombustion chamber will reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions to the atmosphere. Thelimestone is delivered to the station by truck, sized in a Williams DFM crusher and stored in a1250 ton capacity storage tank. The crushed limestone is fed into the boiler’s combustionchamber and burned with the coal. Two cyclones circulate the burned coal and limestone in thecombustion chamber. Propane is used as start-up fuel for the boilers. It is stored in six 30,000gallon capacity storage tanks. Each boiler requires 94,200 SCFM of propane, feeding fourstart-up burners. The waste-coal is very poor quality (as low as 5000 btu/lb, 60% ash, and 35%moisture) and added considerable complexities to the conveyance (1 mile), hogging, storage,and feeding, and combustion.Station service and control air is supplied by three direct driven rotary screw air compressors.Each compressor can deliver 411 SCFM of air at a pressure of 125 psi.Link Scope and AccomplishmentsLink had turn-key accountability for all staff, operations, maintenance, security, procurement,accounting, reporting, environmental and regulatory compliance, and interface with dispatch.Link successfully planned and managed a comprehensive Transition Plan to assumeaccountability for the people, processes, and equipment from an incumbent O&M contractor, aswell as to rejuvenate the performance of the below-par facility. The following charts arerepresentative of the performance improvement:October 2012 North Branch-Electric Plant
  • 25. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESOctober 2012 North Branch-Electric Plant
  • 26. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES Purchase Order BKF 496399October 2012 North Branch-Electric Plant
  • 27. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESBELLEMEADE GENERATING STATION:COGENERATIONSummaryLink had the full-scope, turnkey contract to operate andmaintain the Bellemeade Facility was a 225 MW (net) /250 MW (gross) electric gas/oil fired cogenerationsystem. The facility consisted of turbine systems withheat recovery steam generators that produced steam forsteam turbines as well as for cogeneration purposes. Theoffsite steam host was a cardboard recycling facility thatrequired a continuous high-quality and predictable 150#steam supply, and included an extensive array steampiping, condensate return, and condensing systems. Twingas/oil fired package boilers were capable of supplyingsteam needs if the larger plant was shut down.Major equipment at the facility consists of two (2) combustion turbines/generators, two (2) heatrecovery steam generators with integrated Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for NOx control, one(1) steam turbine/generator, mechanical draft cooling tower, demineralizer, auxiliary boiler, andvarious support equipment.LINK Scope:Combustion Turbines/generatorsThe combustion turbines are two ABB Model GT-11 N machines each driving a Brush Electricgenerator normally rated at 88 MW each. Each machine has on line fuel switching capabilitiesbetween distillate oil and natural gas.Heat Recovery Steam GeneratorsThe HRSG’s consist of two triple pressure ENTEC heat recovery boilers capable of 475,000 poundsper hour of steam flow. Each HRSG is equipped with duct burners (natural gas only) to providesupplemental heat and a Hiatachi Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system for NOx control. TheSCR catalyst base material is titanium oxide with a substrate material of stainless steel 430. TheSCR system also utilizes a 18,000 gallon anhydrous ammonia feed system.October 2012 Bellemeade Generation Plant: Cogeneration
  • 28. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESSteam Turbine/generator and Cooling SystemThe HRSGs provide steam to drive one ABB Vax model condensing extraction steam turbinenominally rated at 75 MW. This is the same model turbine that is in use at the North Branch andMorgantown projects. The cooling system is a closed loop utilizing a Yuba horizontal in-linecondenser and a Thermal Dynamic Towers three cell cooling tower with three Ingersoll-Rand 400horsepower, 200 gpm circulating pumps.Fuel SupplyThe natural gas system consists of one 10 inch and one 4 inch gas main, owned by the City ofRichmond, at 300 psi gas pressure to the site. There are also two Ingersoll-Rand 600 horsepowergas compressors owned by the project that have never been used. The distillate oil system includesan on-site 50,000 gallon storage tank which provides approximately one day of fuel supply to bothunits. The day tank is supplied through a nearby oil storage tank farm facility (several storage tanksare leased from the Little Oil Company) utilizing a pipeline and fuel forwarding facility. Water Supply All water is supplied from the City of Richmond water supply system and is stored in a 1,000,000 gallon storage tank. Process makeup water is purified through an on-site Glegg deminer- alization system and stored in a 500,000 gallon storage tank. All waste water from the site is discharged, after neutralization treatment and oil separation, into the City of Richmond’s waste water treatment system. BudgetLink’s budget requirements to operate this facility at or near requisite capacity factors were$4,293,515 per year for normal operation and maintenance. Purchase Order BKF 496475October 2012 Bellemeade Generation Plant: Cogeneration
  • 29. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESINTERNATIONAL PAPER:COGENERATIONBackgroundInternational Paper operates substantial power generation facilities at multiple mill locations inEastover, SC, Franklin, VA, Prattville AL, and Savannah, GA. Each was originally developed asan integral part of pulp and paper operations, employing a reasonably balanced, efficientcogeneration cycle producing electricity and steam for the plant. Wood waste is used as a fuelto the extent available. Black liquor recovery boilers are utilized for chemical recovery as wellas steam production. Environmental equipment has been installed consistent with theincreasing demands for clean air and water discharges. Some locations such as Franklin haveexpanded the power facility off-site, and furthermore have introduced natural gas as a non-traditional fuel source.After considerable delays in the construction and startup of the new gas/oil fired cogenerationplant at the Franklin mill, Link was engaged to get the commissioning and startup program backon schedule. Link mobilized an experienced staff within 14 days to replace the commissioningstaff of the EPC contractor; and subsequently mobilized an O&M staff to operate and maintainthe facility, with the ultimate objective to train unionized labor staff employed by InternationalPaper.Facility DescriptionInternational Paper’s “910 Facility” in Franklin, VA consisted of a 55 MW(gross) and 45MW (net) gas/oil-fired turbine generator with a heatrecovery steam generator providing process steam to the adjacentpaper mill. The system additionally included cooling towers, waterpurification, condensers, emissions controls, laboratory, and traditionalbalance-of-plant systems such as air compressors, PLC’s leading to thedistributed control system (DCS), building and grounds maintenance,and so forth.Link’s ScopeLink’s scope included:  oversight of EPC completionOctober 2012 International Paper: Cogeneration
  • 30. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES  system walkdowns  punch-list generation, and management to correction  system turnover checklists o mitigation of risks associated with walk-downs, including  alignment and calibration checks  hydros/pressurizations/NDT  equipment startup readings (e.g. volts, amps, etc.)  O&M policies and procedures o Consistent with existing labor union contracts yet attempting to incorporate a more “cross-disciplined” approach  And of course, full-time turn-key operation and maintenance of the 910 cogeneration facility,  Culminating in a seamless turnover to International Paper’s local O&M staff. Purchase Order 97852iP.O. Box 178, Franklin, Virginia 23851October 2012 International Paper: Cogeneration
  • 31. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESPORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSIONFACILITY: TRANSITION MANAGEMENTBackgroundThe Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (partof the Portsmouth site) is a uraniumenrichment plant that was constructed in themid 1950s and operated by the Department ofEnergy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies tosupply both high-and low-enriched uranium fordefense purposes and commercial nuclear fuelsales. The uranium enrichment programutilizing the gaseous diffusion process resultedin the generation of significant quantities ofradioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste,which is referred to as legacy waste, and othercontaminants. Waste and contaminants at thesite include those regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), theToxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), including constructiondebris, sanitary waste, hazardous waste (HW), radioactive low-level waste (LLW), and mixedlow-level waste (MLLW).LATA/Parallax Portsmouth developed and submitted a winning proposal to the Department ofEnergy in response to Request for Proposal to replace the Bechtel Jacobs Company whosecontract was expiring. The Scope included the Clean Up and Remediation/EnvironmentalManagement Services at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.Link ScopeIn support of the requirements of LPP’s efforts to respond to DOE’s RFP and to execute theawarded contract, Link provided an estimate of all employee and labor related transition costs insufficient detail to be included in the target cost of this contract, and assisted determining othertransition costs. Proposed costs were broken down by the following major cost elements:  direct labor (including labor categories, and labor hours in each category),  relocation,  travel,October 2012 Portsmouth Transition
  • 32. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES  materials & supplies,  subcontracts,  and all other costs.Link led the development of a Transition Plan, and supported LPP to enable submittal within 3days after any award to LPP. Detail and scope had to be sufficient to meet the requirements ofDOE. The objectives were: (1) achieve an orderly transition; (2) be fair to incumbent employeesand maintain a productive and flexible work force; (3) minimize the cost of the transition and itsimpacts on other DOE programs; (4) promote those practices which will result in stablecollective bargaining relationships; (5) adhere to DOE’s Workforce Restructuring Plan for thefacility; (6) integrate ES&H into the transition phase to ensure safety and regulatory compliance;and (7) ensure compliance with DOE’s Request for Proposal.The Plan had to address LPP’s approach, methods and processes for the integration andinterfaces with other contactors and private corporations on site. This included LPP’sorganizational structure, strategy and understanding of respective site roles, methods ofresolving disputes and addressing issues, and approach to transition including continuation ofremediation activities, seamless transition of human resources, and strategy for assumption ofthe directed or any other subcontracts. It was also understood that Link’s main focus andresponsibility as it related to the Transition Plan was focused on employee and labor relatedtransition activities. Link managed the Transition Team during the transition period to ensure allTransition Objectives were achieved while also ensuring transition costs incurred are allowable,allocable, and reasonable.Transition Objectives can be summarized as:  Informed incumbent employees about the transition and various stages of the review and hiring process through various means of communication  Engaged Union Labor leadership to achieve mutual understanding early in the transition  Achieved seamless transition of payroll and benefits  Initiated alignment with DOE (PPPO and POOG) and other site contractors through a series of meetings and MOUs to ensure clarity of interfaces, jurisdictions, protocols, and continuity of support  Maintained tight accountability of nuclear material and the security of all site assets  Maintained safety envelope for all facilities and operations  Ensured readiness to maintain compliance with DOE Orders, local, state, and federal regulations, and all remediation requirements  Transitioned (“blue-sheeting”) all existing Policies & Procedures (several thousands) to ensure compliance while streamlining and adapting to a new culture  Set the stage for future rejuvenation of people and processes to achieve DOE objectives.October 2012 Portsmouth Transition
  • 33. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES  Assisted LPP in conducting labor relations in accordance with applicable laws and DOE’s intent that labor relations policies and practices reflect the best experience of American industry in aiming to achieve the stable labor-management relations essential to successful accomplishment of DOE’s programs at reasonable cost.Link provided assistance in recruiting, interviewing, and selecting the LPP staff. Thereafter, Linkprovided ongoing labor relations and HR consultation and advice as needed.Link AccomplishmentsLink completed the transition at Portsmouth on time and under budget, allowing LPP to assumeaccountability for the facility. All transition activities were completed, including an extensive riskmitigation and opportunity rejuvenation process that led to a very successful and profitable 5-year project for LPP. Steven B. Treibel, 2400 Louisiana Blvd, Albuquerque, NM, (505) 884-3800October 2012 Portsmouth Transition
  • 34. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESTRANSITION MANAGEMENT: GENERALIntroductionOver the past 18 years, Link Resources has provided Transition Management1 services to wellover 100 clients - - from utilities to independent energy developers to government, industrial andcommercial companies, both domestically and offshore. Whether transitions are precipitated bymergers, acquisitions, restructurings, or other changes in control of operation, they are complexperiods during which client objectives can be optimized - - of if not properly managed can leadto disaster. For instance, over 75% of all M&As fail to achieve major objectives, and the hind-sight of CEO’s generally blames failures on lack of comprehensive transition planning andexecution.Each transition is different and requires an approach that is customized - - incorporating theappropriate lessons-learned across the spectrum of industries and circumstances. During atransition, staff not only expect change but also typically welcome it. In other words, there is awindow-of-opportunity that can be used to advantage if the transition is planned and executedeffectively. And it is important to note that the transition does not end on the “turnover” date, butcontinues for months thereafter. Thus it is important to retain a transition team to pursuetransition objectives concurrently with day-to-day operations.Although the transition process is complex, if can be summarized by the following stages: Define the New Organizational Objectives  Analyze and Evaluate the Current Organization, Systems, Environment & Infrastructure  Develop a Transition Plan  Implement the Transition Plan and Manage the Change Process  Feedback on Performance, and Iteration1 Link Resources’ trademark is “the Transition Company®”October 2012 Transition: General
  • 35. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIESA list of sample clients to whom Link provided transition services includes:  American Electric Power  Lockheed Martin Energy Systems  Babcock & Wilcox  Lockwood Greene  Bechtel/B&W Idaho  Los Alamos National Lab  Brooklyn Energy Center  Manitoba Hydro International  BWX Technologies  Masada Resource Group  Carolina Power & Light  McGraw-Hill  CH2M Hill  Merchant Energy Group  Constellation Energy  Mettiki Coal  Department of Energy  Mirant  Dominion Virginia Power  MyFacility.com  Duke Engineering & Services  National Trigeneration CHP Company  Dyplast Products, LLC  Navigant Consulting  Enron  Northeast Generation Services  Entergy  NRG  ESB International  Oak Ridge National Lab  Evantage  Permatherm  Fluor-Hanford  Source Energy  Foster Wheeler  Standard Power & LightOctober 2012 Transition: General
  • 36. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES  GPU International  Step Management  Idaho National Energy Lab  Synetics  International Paper  Universal Resources  J.A. Jones Construction  Battelle  LATA/Parallax  World Automation & Technology The following is a sample table of contents of a comprehensive Transition Plan:PRE-TRANSITION ACTIVITIES MOBILIZATION Identify and form Transition Team  Orientation to facility and Client Mobilization  Orientation to client Schedule & inform candidates re: mobilizations  Introductions Plan for Airline ticket/travel mgt  Tours Pre-trip briefings  Lodging and local essentials Team Organization  Access to computers, software, internet, cell phones, etc. Team member Responsibilities/Assignment Matrix  Readiness for 1st week agenda Prepare 1st week schedule ASSESSMENT AND REJUVENATION PLANNING Client Transition Preparations  Engineering Identify client candidates for Transition Team  Capital upgrades, improvement planning & execution Pre-Transition Interfaces with client/investors  Configuration management Coordinate info collection from client Drawing upgrade, control Stakeholder relations plan  Key parameter trending & analysis Hardware/Software/IT plan for client  Root Cause Analysis Communications/phones/internet.networks  Engineering Laptop/software/printers  Chemistry "Intra-Transition-Team communications plan, including e-  Environmental Compliance mails" Set up FTP (or Basecamp) site to use for sharing files in  Code compliance requisites preparation of transition Communicate log-ins to Team  Certificates Develop e-mail distribution lists for different groups Compliance, monitoring, reporting associated with transition Exchange names and contact information for LINK and client  Permits staff to be involved in Transition Transportation  Risk Management Transportation to/fm client  General Condition Assessment Arrange local transportation to/fm hotel  Inventory analysis Coordinate local transportation to/fm lodging  Spare & replacement parts (equipment obsolescence, write-off, quantity & adequacy), condition, storage condition, pedigrees, re-order system, availability) Client Logistics  Tools (hand, special, shop, etc.) Security clearances/access for client  Complete Equipment Condition Assessment Photo Badges?  Visual inspection Introductions/tours at site  Operational trial Arrange offices at site  Maintenance & record review Coordinate local lodging  Equipment history review & incident reports Identify local restaurants  Assessment of adequacy of maintenance record results October 2012 Transition: General
  • 37. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES Identify any local security issues  Fuel Procurement Logistics  Transition Fuel procurement out of military control Hotel reservations  Review of root cause analysis records or lesson learned records Hardhats for Transition Team  Code compliance (design, installation, maintenance, ops) Check into what legal resources are available and necessary  Administration to client? Prepare Transition Budgets  Record-keeping & retention Prepare O&M Budgets  Office Automation Client Transition Preparations  Regulatory Compliances Action plan for client mgt  IT, MIS, networking, communications Client transition team assignments  Decision Approval Matrix HR/Administration  Business Records Client send announcement letter to client employees)  Filing system Briefing plan for client managers  Office Automation Distribute Condensed Transition Plan to client managers  Infrastructure Services (maybe) Identify HR areas requiring immediate evaluation  Human Resources Set up an client document control system to start using prior  Termination (whether/how client has done this) and during transition Negotiate/Execute any Contracts  Outplacement services?? (interview training, resume writing, referral, new-skill training, etc.) Finalize Transition Contract  Employment Contracts? Severance?? Support client/MODA Contracts  Job Descriptions, role definitions, Job Task Analysis Complete any Contracts with LINK Team  Mgt & employee handbooks Check into what legal resources are available and necessary  Policies & procedures (which ones must be done before to client? transition complete & which one can wait?) Complete Guides/Checklists for Assessments  Complete HR Audit/ChecklistASSESSMENT AND REJUVENATION PLANNING  Compensation Review of Reliability Centered Maintenance data, if any  High vs. Low Emergency response (war & regional conflict, typhoons,  Overtime philosophy earthquake, strike, deaths, bomb-threats, terrorist attacks, security breaches, other) Agreements & interfaces (internal & external)  Managers vs. Supervisors vs. Labor Equipment  Shift differentials Relationships and pre-planned communications with  Emergency call-out compensation supporters and stakeholders Safety & Security  Skill based pay consideration Quality/accessibility of policies & procedures  Raise & promotion philosophy Emergency response (see Emergency Response)  Benefits Safety training (see Training)  Social security and benefits Equipment & availability (fire fighting, protective clothing,  Pension funds respiratory protection, etc. Safety code compliance  Staffing & Recruiting Perimeter security  Recruitment & selection (expatriates, key managers, labor) (communications plan) Security access through military  Plan to retain key managers & employees Operations/Production  Personnel Records & Attention Role in maintenance  Training Level of formality  Mgt training/orientation Log keeping: automation vs manual  Employee training/orientation October 2012 Transition: General
  • 38. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES Control system: automation vs manual  What training prior to Turnover Emergency roles  What training is high priority after Turnover Laboratory work  Development of priority Lesson Plans Training, cross-training (see Training)  Organization Information management/technology, archiving, trending  Culture Degree of automation  Work ethic Shift Operations  Control system: automation vs manual Shift philosophy  Emergency roles Shift schedules  Laboratory work Fuel preparation and handling  Training, cross-training (see Training) Production Reporting  Information management/technology, archiving, trending Accounting/Financial  Degree of automation Establish payroll/benefits system  Shift Operations Transition payroll/benefits out of military control  Shift philosophy Inventory & Procurement  Shift schedules Create new Procurement system  Fuel preparation and handling Transition Procurement out of military control  Production Reporting Establish accounting/cash control systems  Accounting/Financial Transition Accounting out of military control  Establish payroll/benefits system Revise chart of accounts as necessary  Transition payroll/benefits out of military control Checks & Balances  Inventory & Procurement Cash control  Create new Procurement system Conservatism & controls  Transition Procurement out of military control Expenditure approvals/authorities  Establish accounting/cash control systems Reports  Transition Accounting out of military control Policies & procedures  Revise chart of accounts as necessary Assess Significant policies and practices  Checks & Balances Adopt/Re-write Policies & Procedures  Cash control Expenditure Approval Matrix  Conservatism & controls Empowerment  Expenditure approvals/authorities Loyalty  Reports Organizational authority vs accountability  Policies & procedures Management philosophy (clarity of role, comparison to  Assess Significant policies and practices superintendents and supervisors, relationship to subordinates, accountability, selection criteria, etc.) Communications & reporting (on-site, to client, to home  Adopt/Re-write Policies & Procedures office) Maintenance  Expenditure Approval Matrix Conduct of maintenance philosophy  Fuel Procurement Quality/accessibility of maintenance policies & procedures  Transition Fuel procurement out of military control Predictive maintenance  Create new Fuel procurement/management system Equipment history  Use of Contractors Outage planning & management  Capital Improvement Planning Contractor management  PRE-TURNOVER REJUVENATION Safety relations  Execute critical training, if any Tool management  Preparation for Capital Improvements Inventory Management  Design new policies, procedures, and/or processes Training  Engineering Multi-discipline philosophy & cross-training  General Condition Assessment October 2012 Transition: General
  • 39. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES Shift philosophy  Administration Roles in emergencies  Human Resources Maintenance Support  Organization Preventive Maintenance  Accounting/Financial Corrective Maintenance & Outage Management  Maintenance Outage Management  Emergency Response Work Order System POST-TURNOVER REJUVENATION Cost & man-hour tracking  Complete re-organization design & recruitments "CMMS system design, selection, configuration, input,  Initiate culture change? utilization, procedure for use, & training" Maintenance Planning & Scheduling  Relationship between ops, maintenance, production, etc. Use of Contractors  Work ethic? Emergency Response / Action Plans  Empowerment? Policies & procedures  Revise or create new policies, procedures, and/or processes as necessary Emergency response (war & regional conflict, typhoons,  Engineering earthquake, strike, deaths, bomb-threats, terrorist attacks, security breaches, other) Agreements & interfaces (internal & external)  General Condition Assessment Equipment  Administration Relationships and pre-planned communications with  Human Resources supporters and stakeholders Safety & Security  Organization Quality/accessibility of policies & procedures Maintenance Emergency response (see Emergency Response)  Emergency Response Safety training (see Training)  Training Equipment & availability (fire fighting, protective clothing,  Safety & Security respiratory protection, etc. Safety code compliance  Operations Perimeter security  Accounting/financial Security access through military  Execute Capital Improvements Operations/Production  Agenda: Balance Of First Week after Turnover Role in maintenance  Establish goals and objectives for first year of operations Level of formality  Safety Log keeping: automation vs manual  Safety Training Training  Hold daily staff meetings first thing in morning with management staff Safety & Security  "Commence safety & security audits, revise safety program as appropriate and plan training" Operations  HR Develop Initial Operating Plan  Ensure employees have completed all administrative forms Develop Initial Operating Budget  Finalize of Operating budget Establish functional accounting/procurement/payroll  Finalize all critical soft/hard systems/processes up and running Establish functional HR/employment process  Vendor Continuity/Contracts Establish functional fuel management process  Meet with key vendors Ensure all legal permits/authorities in place  Finalize critical accounts with plant vendor Correct critical safety deficiencies  Review Capital Improvement Plans Correct critical operational deficiencies  Operational Issues Correct any critical personnel deficiencies  Hold daily staff meetings with management staff October 2012 Transition: General
  • 40. SAMPLE PAST PERFORMANCE PROJECT SUMMARIES Correct ""other"" critical processes to meet Turnover Day  Complete review/revision of existing operating procedures objectives Prepare Agenda for "First Day after Turnover"  Complete review of other documents Otherwise prepare for Turnover  Continue Equipment Condition Assessment TURNOVER  Continue Other Assessments Execute Agenda: First Day  Complete "First 30-day Agenda” Ensure Safety and Security  Agenda: First 30 Days after Turnover Ensure Continuity of Operations  Conduct Short Term Training Management and Supervision Meetings  Complete training audit and finalize long-range training plan Conduct staff meeting with all managers and supervisors --  Complete safety and security training state forth in clear terms roles, responsibilities, and accountabilities of management team Clarify goals and objectives of short term plant operations;  Conduct Phase I management basic training, on generally discuss long term, with emphasis on continuity of accountabilities, responsibilities, and authorities operations Discuss 90 day action plan  Complete Conduct of Maintenance training?? Review what will be covered in “All Employees Meetings”  Complete Correction of Assessment Deficiencies or Rejuvenation Plans Questions and answer period  Complete Agenda for "First-90 Days" Employees Meetings  Agenda: First 90 Days after Turnover Commence meetings with all employees (why, what, when)  Training Time line for changeover  Complete Conduct of Operations training Philosophy and Vision  Commence Phase II managerial training on operating and administrative procedures Culture and Performance Expectations  Conduct Phase III managerial training Commitment to operations  Complete other trainingCommitment & plan for training  Finalize any revision of operating and administrative proceduresQuestion and answer period  Finalize 5-year capital improvement planExecute Safety Plan (1st day and 1st week plan)  Finalize 5-Year Operating PlanExecute Continuity of Operations Plan (1st day and 1st week  Finalize 5-Year Budgetplan)Execute Communications Plan (1st week plan, internal and  Continue Implementation of Capital Improvementsexternal comms)Execution of Mutual Employment ObligationsE.g. Payroll, management, etc.Execution of Care/Custody/Control ObligationsE.g. Insurance, compliance, reporting, etc.Initiate accounting, payroll, procurement, employment, andother processes October 2012 Transition: General