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Lmi Orientation Pyc0311new
 

Lmi Orientation Pyc0311new

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This presentation was for a group of WIA youth case managers and focused on using LMI in career counseling settings.

This presentation was for a group of WIA youth case managers and focused on using LMI in career counseling settings.

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    Lmi Orientation Pyc0311new Lmi Orientation Pyc0311new Presentation Transcript

        • Gary Crossley
        • Friday, March 10, 2011
      • Intro & Why Are We Here
      • This is a Test
      • Key Basic Questions – Who, What, Where
      • Resources & Examples
      • Test Answers How Did You Do?
      • Keeping a Balanced Perspective
      • Summary
      • Questions
      • What jobs are growing?
      • What qualifications do I need for the job?
      • How much does the job pay?
      • How do I know which job is best for me?
      • Which jobs have the most openings?
      • Where are the employers who are hiring?
      • Can I find the job duties for certain occupations?
      • L abor
      • M arket
      • I nformation
    • A dynamic and systematic approach to data—designed to meet the changing needs of customers
      • Or, to put it more simply …
      • Basically, it’s any data or analysis that relates to the workforce.
      • Customer Driven
      • Determine Needs
      • Determine Method of Delivery
      • Speaking the Language –
      • Acronyms and Concepts
      • Employed
        • Worked at least one hour for pay
        • During the week that includes the 12 th
      • Unemployed
        • No job attachment
        • Able, available for and actively
        • seeking work
        • Can be experienced or a new or re-entrant
      • Labor Force
        • 16+ years old
        • Employed + Unemployed
      • Unemployment rate
        • Unemployed ÷ Labor Force
          • Expressed as %
      • Labor Force Participation rate
        • Labor Force ÷ Working Age Population
      • Discouraged Workers
        • Harder to define and sometimes undercounted
        • Generally are on long-term layoff with no immediate prospects
      • Underemployment
        • Also hard to define and count
        • Basically can be anyone working below their skill level
        • Might be underemployed by choice
        • BLS Cooperative Programs
      • The Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW)
      • UI quarterly contribution reports
      • UCFE federal agency employment
      • Supplementary employer surveys by state LMI offices
        • Multiple establishment detail (MWR)
        • Industrial coding (annual refile survey)
        • Follow-ups triggered by edits
      • Employment benchmarks for all BLS federal/state employer survey programs
      • — CES, OES & OSHA
      • Critical for Bureau of Economic Analysis
        • Personal income
        • State and national product
      • Local planning
        • Only consistent source of county employment and wages by industry
      • Analysis requiring universe or detailed data
      • The Current Employment Statistics (CES) Program
      • Covered employment from QCEW, supplemented with non-covered adjustments, is used to benchmark levels.
      • A monthly employer survey is a major part of the program, using a variety of collection methods.
      • A primary economic indicator of employment, earnings, and working hours for national, state, and selected areas
      • Total employment growth used by Federal Reserve
      • Incorporated in preliminary estimates of National Product and Income
      • Incorporated into productivity estimates
      • And now on to…
      • The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) Program
      • OES: An employer survey which produces employment and wage-rate estimates by occupation and industry for states and areas
      • BLS and ETA originally shared responsibility with the states.
      • When BLS took total federal responsibility for the program, existing funds were spread over all states.
      • Data developed with most current 3 years of data
      • Surveys conducted twice annually
      • Employment by occupation tallied for each detailed industry
      • Staffing ratios developed representing each occupation’s share of industry employment
      • Data tallied by wage ranges
      • Wage-rate averages generated by weighted interpolations
      • Prior data aged (brought up to date) by other BLS wage survey trends (ECI)
      • ETA funded but tied to OES
      • Composed of adjusted OES staffing ratios applied to industry employment projections
      • Short-term projections — 2 years out
      • Long-term projections: 10 years out
      • Technical assistance available at the following site: dev.projectionscentral.com
      • The fourth BLS program is …
      • The LAUS Program
      • Which stands for Local Area Unemployment Statistics
      • Less erratic trend than direct CPS monthly state estimates
      • Cheaper than direct CPS estimates
      • Predicts annual averages more accurately than handbook-trended estimates
      • Note: U.S. data comes directly from the CPS, not from a model.
      • Handbook method - used to allocate labor market areas (LMAs) from state estimates
      • Population-claims method used where possible for estimates of LMA parts
      • Census-share method used for parts of LMAs when claims are not available
      • No statistical measures of precision
      • Lastly, we come to …
      • The Mass Layoff Statistics (MLS) Program
      • Began life as PMLPC in 1984 under JTPA
      • Renamed Mass Layoff Statistics in 1989
      • Intent: To track serious layoffs and closings by industry
        • Not very useful for Rapid Response
        • Good post-occurrence analytical tool
      • Many states don’t have enough activity to publish data
      • BLS Handbook of Methods
      • Download:
      • www.bls.gov/opub/hom
    •  
      • Who are the LMI producers in the system?
      • Public, Private, & Associations
      • What resources are available?
      • System Resources
      • Department of Labor
        • Employment & Training Administration
        • Bureau of Labor Statistics
      • Department of Commerce
        • Census
        • Economic Development Administration
      • Other Agencies/Federal Entities
        • Congress Joint Economic Committee
        • White House Council of Economic Advisors
      • Universities and Think Tanks (National Academies, Brookings, Urban Institute, NBER)
      • Manpower, Inc. (Survey of Business Hiring)
      • The Conference Board (help wanted & job bank openings)
      • Hudson Institute (Workforce 2020)
      • Media (News, Business Journals, etc.)
      • EMSI (Customized WIA Labor Market Profiles)
      • Haver Analytics (Economic Profiles)
      • Brandt Info Services (Green Job Estimates)
      • Others (National, State, Regional, & Local Groups)
      • Chambers of Commerce
      • Economic Development
      • Power & Utility Companies
      • Banks
      • Manufacturers
      • America’s Career One Stop, www.acinet.org/acinet/
      • O*Net, www.onetcenter.org
      • Occupational Outlook Handbook, www.bls.gov/oco/ & Occupational Outlook Quarterly, www.bls.gov/opub/ooq/
      • Labor Market Information Shops in the States
      • Various National Groups (Be Sure & Review the Assumptions!)
      • Regional State & Local Groups (Depends on the Use – Revenue and Tax Projections, Construction & Zoning Issues, Market Development (Store & Mall Location
      • State Occupational and Industry Projections
      • LMI State OES Programs
      • Salary.com
      • O*Net web site
      • SalaryExpert.com
      • Google.com
      • Career Builder
      • College Grad Job Hunter
      • Monster.com
      • Nation Job Network
      • Job Central.com
      • Indeed.com
      • SnagaJob.com
      • Craig’s List (Be careful of scams)
      • Lowcountry Help Wanted.com
      • Post & Courier (Charleston.net)
      • WorkSC.org (State Lib.)
      • Jibber Jobber
      • Job Hunters Bible
      • Wall Street Journal Online Career Tool
      • The Riley Guide
      • Flowork International
      • Quintessential Careers
      • Yahoo and AOL Hot Jobs
      • Google It!
      • Dun & Bradstreet
      • Hoover’s Online
      • Rutgers Library Company Research Guide
      • Vault.com
      • Wetfeet.com
      • Charleston Regional Business Journal
      • www.projectionscentral.com : displays projected data for all states
      • www.dev.projectionscentral.com : technical assistance for producing projections
      • Employment Dynamics from BLS: Job gains and losses by area from QCEW
      • www.bls.gov/bdm
      • Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics from Census: Uses UI and Census data to measure detailed workforce activity by area
      • LEHD/LED also produces Quarterly Workforce Indicators
      • www.lehd.did.census.gov
      • Job-Hunt.org
      • JobHuntersBible.com
      • The Riley Guide
      • AOL.com & Yahoo.com Employment and Work
      • JobStar
      • Occupational Supply and Demand System – Georgia State University
      • www.occsupplydemand.org
      • Office of Apprenticeship Training, Employer & Labor Services, Department of Labor, www.dol.gov/dol/topic/training/apprenticeship.htm
      • The Corporation for National & Community Services (Americorps, Senior Corp, etc.)
      • The Job Corps, Department of Labor, www.jobcorps.gov
      • Peace Corps, www.peacecorps.gov
      • Department of Defense, www.defense.gov
      • Military.com
      • TodaysMilitary.com
      • USMilitary.about.com
      • Individual Service Branch web sites
      • How did you fare on the questions?
      • Interest Location
      • Family
      • Aptitude/Skills
      • Wages
      • Job Availability
      • Return on Investment
      • Barriers (Trans., Addic., Children, etc.)
      • Lot of new LMI now available
      • Information Overload
      • Paralysis by Analysis
      • Value added role to interpret data to make LMI relevant and useful
      • Guidance and available resource – right data at the right time for enhanced choice
    • ANY QUESTIONS?